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Product listing: PTEN (D3Q6G) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P60484 #14642 to Rab10 (D36C4) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P61026 #8127

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated PTEN (D4.3) XP® Rabbit mAb #9188 reacts with human, mouse, rat and monkey PTEN protein. PTEN (D4.3) XP® Rabbit mAb (Biotinylated) also recognizes PTEN in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$348
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. PTEN (D4.3) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of PTEN protein.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
$695
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTK6/BRK (protein-tyrosine kinase 6, Breast Tumor Kinase) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that is closely related to the FRK family of kinases and distantly related to SRC family kinases (1). PTK6/BRK possesses an N-terminal SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain that regulates kinase-substrate interactions, an auto-inhibitory SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain, and a carboxy-terminal kinase domain. Phosphorylation at Tyr342 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates kinase activity, whereas phosphorylation at Tyr447 inhibits kinase activity (2). PTK6/BRK is expressed in differentiated epithelial cells in normal skin, gastrointestinal tract and colon, and its expression level is reportedly upregulated in some cancer cell types, including breast carcinoma, prostate cancer and colon cancer (3-5). Although typically localized in the nucleus of normal cells, PTK6/BRK has also been observed in the cytosol and plasma membrane in some contexts, notably during tumor progression, where it likely interacts with unique substrates. In the nucleus, PTK6/BRK functions to mediate signaling events important for differentiation and apoptosis (4); outside the nucleus, PTK6/BRK may function to relay upstream RTK signaling to downstream pathways via phosphorylation and activation of substrates such as paxillin, STAT and AKT, which in turn activate pathways to promote cell survival, invasion and migration. The upregulation, altered subcellular localization and associated signaling functions of PTK6/BRK in tumor cells make it a promising target for cancer therapy (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTK7 (CCK4) is a non-active receptor tyrosine kinase originally identified in colon carcinoma cells (1). PTK7 functions in cell adhesion, cell migration, cell polarity, proliferation, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and apoptosis to regulate embryogenesis, epithelial tissue organization, neuronal tube closure, neuronal crest formation, and axon guidance (2-5). PTK7 acts as a co-receptor in both the non-canonical (also known as the Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling) and the canonical Wnt signaling pathways (6). In the non-canonical Wnt pathway, PTK7 activates downstream signaling by direct interaction with RACK1 and recruitment of DSH into the membrane localized receptor complex (3,6,7). PTK7 exerts an inhibitory effect on canonical Wnt pathway signal transduction through competition for frizzled receptor binding at the membrane surface (8). PTK7 gene expression is regulated by Cdx (9), while protein stability is regulated by membrane associated proteinase degradation. PTK7 is targeted for proteolytic degradation and extracellular domain shedding by the metalloproteinases MMP14 and Adam17, leading to enhanced cell proliferatiion, migration, and facilitated cancer cell invasion (10,11). PTK7 has been shown to regulate other signaling pathways by functioning as a co-receptor with membrane receptors, such as Plexin A1 and VEGFR1 (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTP-PEST is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase with multiple proline-rich regions that appear to be the docking sites for PTP-PEST binding partners or substrates (1). PTP-PEST regulates fibroblast adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis through its association with and dephosphorylation of p130 Cas, paxillin, PSTPIP1, WASP, and other adhesion molecules (1-5). By modulating phosphorylation states of Shc, Pyk2, Fak, and WASP, PTP-PEST negatively regulates lymphocyte activation (1,6). In mammary epithelial cells, EGF facilitates the dephosphorylation of Jak2 by PTP-PEST, thereby interfering with lactogenic hormone PRL signaling (7). PTP-PEST dephosphorylates c-Abl as well, which affects the phosphorylation states of PTP-PEST substrates such as paxillin, p130 Cas, Crk, and PSTPIP1 (8).PTP-PEST regulates adhesion and motility of cultured epithelial cells through modulation of Rho GTPase activity (9), and is required for integrin-mediated endothelial cell adhesion and migration (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTP-PEST is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase with multiple proline-rich regions that appear to be the docking sites for PTP-PEST binding partners or substrates (1). PTP-PEST regulates fibroblast adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis through its association with and dephosphorylation of p130 Cas, paxillin, PSTPIP1, WASP, and other adhesion molecules (1-5). By modulating phosphorylation states of Shc, Pyk2, Fak, and WASP, PTP-PEST negatively regulates lymphocyte activation (1,6). In mammary epithelial cells, EGF facilitates the dephosphorylation of Jak2 by PTP-PEST, thereby interfering with lactogenic hormone PRL signaling (7). PTP-PEST dephosphorylates c-Abl as well, which affects the phosphorylation states of PTP-PEST substrates such as paxillin, p130 Cas, Crk, and PSTPIP1 (8).PTP-PEST regulates adhesion and motility of cultured epithelial cells through modulation of Rho GTPase activity (9), and is required for integrin-mediated endothelial cell adhesion and migration (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type-14 (PTPN14, Pez, PTPD2 and PTP36) is an evolutionarily conserved non-membrane tyrosine phosphatase with homology to the band 4.1 family of proteins (1-3). The PTPN14 protein contains an amino-terminal FERM (4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin) domain, which suggests plasma membrane localization of the protein, and a carboxy-terminal protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain (4). Research studies have identified possible roles for PTPN14 in multiple, diverse signaling pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, cell migration and adhesion, and development. The PTPN14 phosphatase regulates the subcellular localization of YAP in a cell density-dependent manner, indicating a role for PTPN14 in the Hippo signaling pathway (5). The Drosophila PTPN14 homolog Pez localizes to adherens junctions, where it may regulate cell motility through dephosphorylation of β-catenin (3). PTPN14 may play a role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition through effects on the TGF-β signaling pathway (6), and interacts with VEGFR3, a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in lymphangiogenesis (7). Loss-of-function mutations in the PTPN14 gene are associated with colorectal cancer (8), and choanal atresia and lymphedema, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defects in both nasal passage development and lymphangiogenesis (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTPN18 is a member of the PEST family of nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatases, a group that also includes PTP-PEST and PEP (1-3). Members of this protein family contain an N-terminal catalytic domain and a noncatalytic C-terminal domain with a PEST motif that mediates protein-protein interactions (4). PTPN18 was first identified in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), where it was suggested to play a role in HSC differentiation (1-3). Subsequently, PTPN18 was shown to bind to c-Src kinase, forming a protein complex that functions to inhibit Src-family kinase signaling (4,5). More recently, PTPN18 expression has been shown to correlate with HER2 receptor expression in breast cancer cell lines (6,7), where it has been suggested to repress HER2 signaling (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTPN22 (Lyp/PEP) is a cytoplasmic phosphatase expressed by hematopoietic cells (1,2). PTPN22 associates with the tyrosine kinase Csk to inhibit T cell receptor signaling through inactivation of Src kinases (3,4). Csk phosphorylates Src kinases on an inhibitory tyrosine, while PTPN22 dephosphorylates an activating site (4). PTPN22(-/-) mice have higher levels of activated Lck than wild-type, resulting in greater T cell expansion and increased serum antibody levels (5). Research studies have shown that a single-nucleotide polymorphism, 1858T of the PTPN22 gene which encodes the amino acid substitution R620W, confers increased risk for multiple autoimmune diseases including type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Graves disease (6-9). Interestingly, although the R620W substitution disrupts the interaction between Csk and PTPN22, it is actually a gain-of-function mutation resulting in increased phosphatase activity (6,10,11). Recent evidence suggests that the autoimmune phenotype associated with the R620W variant is the result of increased calpain-mediated degradation and decreased protein levels of PTPN22 (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #2258 reacts with human and mouse PU.1 protein. CST expects that PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize PU.1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #2258 reacts with human and mouse PU.1 protein. CST expects that PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize PU.1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PU.1 (9G7) Rabbit mAb #2258.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus receptor (PVR, CD155) is an immunoglobulin-like, transmembrane glycoprotein originally described as a mediator of poliovirus attachment to cells and later identified as important in adherens junction formation. Also known as nectin-like 5 (Necl-5), PVR binds nectin-3 and interacts with integrin αvβ3 and PDGFR to regulate integrin clustering and focal contact formation at the leading edge of migrating cells (1,2). Research studies demonstrate that PVR and nectin-3 regulate contact inhibition during cell motility and proliferation in transformed 3T3 cells (3). Additional research indicates that PVR (CD155, Necl-5) expression may play a role in invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma (4,5). In the immune system, CD155 plays a role in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus receptor (PVR, CD155) is an immunoglobulin-like, transmembrane glycoprotein originally described as a mediator of poliovirus attachment to cells and later identified as important in adherens junction formation. Also known as nectin-like 5 (Necl-5), PVR binds nectin-3 and interacts with integrin αvβ3 and PDGFR to regulate integrin clustering and focal contact formation at the leading edge of migrating cells (1,2). Research studies demonstrate that PVR and nectin-3 regulate contact inhibition during cell motility and proliferation in transformed 3T3 cells (3). Additional research indicates that PVR (CD155, Necl-5) expression may play a role in invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma (4,5). In the immune system, CD155 plays a role in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus Receptor-Related Immunoglobulin Domain-Containing Protein (PVRIG; also known as CD112 receptor) is a multiple transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of T cells and NK cells, predominantly on memory and effector CD8+ T cells. PVRIG expression is upregulated after in vitro T cell activation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. PVRIG competes with DNAM-1/CD226 for interaction with the receptor ligand Nectin-2. Upon ligation of PVRIG and Nectin-2, T cell proliferation is inhibited, suggesting PVRIG is a co-inhibitory receptor that dampens T cell functions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY; also known as Peptide YY) is a short amino acid peptide that is a member of the gastrointestinal (GI) family of hormones (1). Other GI hormone family members include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), ghrelin, cholecytokinin (CCK), leptin, glucose, and insulin. GI hormones have diverse physiological and behavioral functions, but some are part of the brain-gut axis that combines neural functions with the gut to regulate appetite and satiety. This subset of hormones is expressed in enteroendocrine cells, specialized cells of the GI tract and pancreas that are part of the enteric endocrine system. PYY, as well as GLP-1, is secreted by a specific group of enteroendocrine cells, L cells, which line parts of the ileum and colon. At least two endogenous forms of PYY exist: full length PYY (1-36) and cleavage-generated PYY (3-36). Ectopic peripheral injection of PYY (3-36) suppresses food intake and reduces weight gain (2). Systemic PYY (3-36) is likely to regulate food intake, in part, by regulation of hypothalamus-mediated homeostasis via arcuate nucleus (Arc)-expressed neuropeptide Y2 receptor (Y2R) (2, 3). Thus, Peptide YY is an important GI hormone that regulates Arc-expressed neuropeptide Y2R to inhibit feeding in the gut-hypothalamic pathway.

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab10 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small Rab GTPases (1) that interacts with Mss4, myosin V (Va, Vb and Vc) and GDI as it helps mediate sorting among cellular endosomes (2-4). Mutation analysis and GFP-fusion protein expression of Rab10 in MDCK cells determined that Rab10 plays a regulatory role in membrane protein transport between early endosomes and basolateral compartments (5,6). Rab10 associates with the GLUT4 complex as a target for AS160 and is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes (7,8).