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Product listing: SirT1 (D60E1) Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific), UniProt ID Q923E4 #3931 to Smad1 (D59D7) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q15797 #6944

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response and cell aging (1). SirT3, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, exists in human cells in two forms. The full-length 44 kDa protein localizes to the nucleus, while a processed 28 kDa protein lacking 142 amino terminal residues localizes exclusively to the mitochondria (2-4). The single murine form of SirT3 is equivalent to the processed human SirT3 protein (2). Full-length SirT3 protein is processed in the mitochondrial matrix by the mitochondrial matrix processing peptidase (MMP) (3). Both full-length and processed forms of SirT3 are enzymatically active and de-acetylate histone H3 at Lys9 and histone H4 at Lys16 in vitro (2). SirT3 also de-acetylates Lys642 of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (AceCS2) and activates AceCS2 activity in the mitochondria (5). Restricted caloric intake, which is linked to increased lifespan in multiple organisms, increases SirT3 expression in white and brown adipocytes of obese mice, suggesting a role for SirT3 in aging (6). Two observations implicate SirT3 in the regulation of mitochondrial thermogenesis. First, exposure to cold temperatures increases SirT3 expression in brown adipocytes, while elevated temperatures reduce SirT3 expression (6). Second, over-expression of SirT3 results in increased levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) (6). SirT3 protein levels are also elevated in certain breast cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response and cell aging (1). SirT3, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, exists in human cells in two forms. The full-length 44 kDa protein localizes to the nucleus, while a processed 28 kDa protein lacking 142 amino terminal residues localizes exclusively to the mitochondria (2-4). The single murine form of SirT3 is equivalent to the processed human SirT3 protein (2). Full-length SirT3 protein is processed in the mitochondrial matrix by the mitochondrial matrix processing peptidase (MMP) (3). Both full-length and processed forms of SirT3 are enzymatically active and de-acetylate histone H3 at Lys9 and histone H4 at Lys16 in vitro (2). SirT3 also de-acetylates Lys642 of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (AceCS2) and activates AceCS2 activity in the mitochondria (5). Restricted caloric intake, which is linked to increased lifespan in multiple organisms, increases SirT3 expression in white and brown adipocytes of obese mice, suggesting a role for SirT3 in aging (6). Two observations implicate SirT3 in the regulation of mitochondrial thermogenesis. First, exposure to cold temperatures increases SirT3 expression in brown adipocytes, while elevated temperatures reduce SirT3 expression (6). Second, over-expression of SirT3 results in increased levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) (6). SirT3 protein levels are also elevated in certain breast cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT5, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized to the mitochondria and has been implicated in the regulation of cell metabolism (2,3). SirT5 deacetylates carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) in the mitochondrial matrix and increases its activity in response to fasting, allowing for adaptation to increased amino acid catabolism (4). SirT5 has also been shown to deacetylate cytochrome c in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (5). In addition to its deacetylase activity, SirT5 contains lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity (6,7). Succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine modifications occur in a variety of organisms and these post-translational modifications are found on many metabolic enzymes (6-8). Like phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues, lysine succinylation and malonylation induces a change of two negative charges from a +1 to a -1 charge at physiological pH, and are thought to serve similar functions in the regulation of protein activity, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability. SirT5 knockout mice show increased levels of succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine protein modifications in the liver, including increased succinylation of CPS1, a known target of SirT5, suggesting that SirT5 functions to regulate metabolic enzymes through its deacetylase, desuccinylase, and demalonylase activities (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT5, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized to the mitochondria and has been implicated in the regulation of cell metabolism (2,3). SirT5 deacetylates carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) in the mitochondrial matrix and increases its activity in response to fasting, allowing for adaptation to increased amino acid catabolism (4). SirT5 has also been shown to deacetylate cytochrome c in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (5). In addition to its deacetylase activity, SirT5 contains lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity (6,7). Succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine modifications occur in a variety of organisms and these post-translational modifications are found on many metabolic enzymes (6-8). Like phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues, lysine succinylation and malonylation induces a change of two negative charges from a +1 to a -1 charge at physiological pH, and are thought to serve similar functions in the regulation of protein activity, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability. SirT5 knockout mice show increased levels of succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine protein modifications in the liver, including increased succinylation of CPS1, a known target of SirT5, suggesting that SirT5 functions to regulate metabolic enzymes through its deacetylase, desuccinylase, and demalonylase activities (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT7, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized primarily in the nucleolus and is most prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells, especially myeloid progenitor cells (2). SirT7 is recruited to chromatin by sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors such as Elk-4, where it functions to deacetylate Lys18 of histone H3 at gene promoters and facilitate transcriptional repression (3). Interestingly, overexpression of SirT7 induces a global decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation levels, a phenotype that has been associated with poor prognosis in prostate, lung, kidney, and pancreatic cancers in the research literature (3-5). Furthermore, studies have also shown that SirT7 is required for the maintenance of several transformed phenotypes of cancer cells, including anchorage-independent cell growth, growth in low serum conditions, and tumor formation in xenograft assays (3). SirT7 is also required for the E1A-induced decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation, induction of cell-cycle entry, and escape from contact inhibition (3). Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that SirT7 is an important regulator of cellular transformation. Research has shown that the SirT7 gene is located on chromosome 17q25.3, a region that is frequently altered in acute leukemia and lymphoma (2), and SirT7 overexpression and amplification have been detected in multiple types of cancer (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sine oculis homeobox (SIX) proteins belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors discovered in Drosophila mutant screens for embryonic eye development genes (1-3). The prototypical family member (sine oculis, so) was named for eyeless embryos carrying mutations in a gene highly conserved among vertebrates, including humans (SIX1) (4). A total of six family members (SIX1-6) have been identified in vertebrates. Each SIX protein contains a homeobox nucleic acid recognition domain (HD) with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif and an adjacent SIX domain, which may be involved in regulating protein-protein interactions (5). In addition to their critical functions during embryonic organogenesis, research studies suggest that SIX proteins play additional roles in postnatal cell cycle regulation, with potentially important implications in tumorigenesis (6,7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sine oculis homeobox (SIX) proteins belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors discovered in Drosophila mutant screens for embryonic eye development genes (1-3). The prototypical family member (sine oculis, so) was named for eyeless embryos carrying mutations in a gene highly conserved among vertebrates, including humans (SIX1) (4). A total of six family members (SIX1-6) have been identified in vertebrates. Each SIX protein contains a homeobox nucleic acid recognition domain (HD) with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif and an adjacent SIX domain, which may be involved in regulating protein-protein interactions (5). In addition to their critical functions during embryonic organogenesis, research studies suggest that SIX proteins play additional roles in postnatal cell cycle regulation, with potentially important implications in tumorigenesis (6,7).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: p70 S6 kinase is a mitogen activated Ser/Thr protein kinase downstream of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and the target of rapamycin, FRAP/mTOR. p70 S6 kinase is required for cell growth and cell cycle progression (1,2). SKAR is a recently discovered substrate of S6K1. SKAR exists in two isoforms, α and β, the latter having a 29 amino acid truncation. Phosphorylation of SKAR is mitogen-induced and sensitive to rapamycin. Reduction in SKAR protein levels results in decreased cell size, further implicating SKAR in cell growth control (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). Recent data suggests that activated E2 associates transiently with E3, and the dissociation is a critical step for ubiquitination (5). S phase kinase-associated protein 1 (Skp1) is a critical scaffold protein of the Skp1/CUL1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase protein complex. Various F-box proteins (e.g., β-TrCP, Skp2) mediate an interaction with Skp1, via their defining and conserved domain of 40 amino acids, and with substrates to be ubiquitinated (e.g., β-catenin, p27) (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SLFN11 is a nuclear protein that belongs to the Schlafen (SLFN) family of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and growth inhibition (1, 2). Expression of SLFN11 predicts sensitivity of cancer cell lines to DNA-damaging agents (1, 3). Evidence suggests that in the presence of DNA-targeted therapies, SLFN11 is recruited to stressed replication forks where it blocks replication leading to cell death (4). SLFN11 is being explored as a predictive biomarker for response to DNA-targeted therapies (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SLIT2 is an extracellular matrix-associated SLIT family member that functions as a ligand for roundabout (ROBO) family receptors (1). Activation of ROBO receptors by SLIT2 regulates various biological processes, including promoting cellular senescence via WNT inhibition (2), suppressing migration by enhanced β-catenin/E-cadherin association, regulating actin polymerization (4, 5), and suppressing cell proliferation induced by SDF1 and MCP1 (6, 7). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance, angiogenesis, and both kidney and mammary gland organogenesis. SLIT2 expression has been reported to suppress cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, suggesting that modulation of SLIT2-ROBO signaling may have therapeutic potential in cancer biology (8, 9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2 and also known as STOML2) is a lipid-anchored mitochondrial protein that is part of a large protein complex that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Proteomic studies identified SLP-2 as a widely expressed mitochondria-enriched protein (1). As a member of both the stomatin family and stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HfLC/K (SPFH) superfamily of proteins, SLP-2 forms large hetero-oligomeric complexes with other mitochondrial proteins, including prohibtin, mitofusin 2, and cardiolipin (2, 3). SLP-2 contains a highly conserved SPFH domain that mediates its ability to associate with the mitochondrial inner membrane and form specialized membrane microdomains. As an inner membrane organizer of other mitochondrial proteins, SLP-2 performs multiple mitochondrial functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, energy/calcium homeostasis, translation, and mitochondrial-mediated cellular stress responses (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Enhanced SLP-2 expression is also associated with several human cancers, including gallbladder, rectal, and gastric cancer (9, 10, 11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2 and also known as STOML2) is a lipid-anchored mitochondrial protein that is part of a large protein complex that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Proteomic studies identified SLP-2 as a widely expressed mitochondria-enriched protein (1). As a member of both the stomatin family and stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HfLC/K (SPFH) superfamily of proteins, SLP-2 forms large hetero-oligomeric complexes with other mitochondrial proteins, including prohibtin, mitofusin 2, and cardiolipin (2, 3). SLP-2 contains a highly conserved SPFH domain that mediates its ability to associate with the mitochondrial inner membrane and form specialized membrane microdomains. As an inner membrane organizer of other mitochondrial proteins, SLP-2 performs multiple mitochondrial functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, energy/calcium homeostasis, translation, and mitochondrial-mediated cellular stress responses (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Enhanced SLP-2 expression is also associated with several human cancers, including gallbladder, rectal, and gastric cancer (9, 10, 11).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated SLP-76 (D1R1A) Rabbit mAb #70896.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated SLP-76 (D1R1A) Rabbit mAb #70896.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Slug (SNAI2) is a widely expressed transcriptional repressor and member of the Snail family of zinc finger transcription factors (1). Similar to the related Snail protein, Slug binds to the E-cadherin promoter region to repress transcription during development (2). The binding of Slug to integrin promoter sequences represses integrin expression and results in reduced cell adhesion (3). Down regulation of E-cadherin expression occurs during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition during embryonic development, a process also exploited by invasive cancer cells (4,5). The tumor suppressor protein p53 induces Slug expression in γ-irradiated cells; Slug protects damaged cells from apoptosis by repressing p53-induced transcription of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Puma (6). Deletion mutations in the corresponding Slug gene are associated with the pigmentation disorders Waardenburg Syndrome and Piebaldism, while a genetic duplication resulting in Slug overexpression is associated with a collection of congenital heart defects termed tetralogy of Fallot (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Smac/Diablo is a 21 kDa mammalian mitochondrial protein that functions as a regulatory component during apoptosis (1,2). Upon mitochondrial stress, Smac/Diablo is released from mitochondria and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins) (1,2). The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effect of the IAPs on caspases (3,4). This interaction involves mainly the amino-terminal residues of Smac/Diablo with the BIR3 region of XIAP, supplemented with several other hydrophobic interactions between the helical structures of Smac/Diablo and other areas of BIR3 (5,6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Smac/Diablo (D5S3R) Rabbit mAb #15108.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Smac/Diablo is a 21 kDa mammalian mitochondrial protein that functions as a regulatory component during apoptosis (1,2). Upon mitochondrial stress, Smac/Diablo is released from mitochondria and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins) (1,2). The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effect of the IAPs on caspases (3,4). This interaction involves mainly the amino-terminal residues of Smac/Diablo with the BIR3 region of XIAP, supplemented with several other hydrophobic interactions between the helical structures of Smac/Diablo and other areas of BIR3 (5,6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Smac/Diablo (D5S3R) Rabbit mAb #15108.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Smac/Diablo is a 21 kDa mammalian mitochondrial protein that functions as a regulatory component during apoptosis (1,2). Upon mitochondrial stress, Smac/Diablo is released from mitochondria and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins) (1,2). The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effect of the IAPs on caspases (3,4). This interaction involves mainly the amino-terminal residues of Smac/Diablo with the BIR3 region of XIAP, supplemented with several other hydrophobic interactions between the helical structures of Smac/Diablo and other areas of BIR3 (5,6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Smac/Diablo is a 21 kDa mammalian mitochondrial protein that functions as a regulatory component during apoptosis (1,2). Upon mitochondrial stress, Smac/Diablo is released from mitochondria and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins) (1,2). The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effect of the IAPs on caspases (3,4). This interaction involves mainly the amino-terminal residues of Smac/Diablo with the BIR3 region of XIAP, supplemented with several other hydrophobic interactions between the helical structures of Smac/Diablo and other areas of BIR3 (5,6).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Smad1 (D59D7) XP® Rabbit mAb #6944.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) constitute a large family of signaling molecules that regulate a wide range of critical processes including morphogenesis, cell-fate determination, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis (1,2). BMP receptors are members of the TGF-β family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors. Ligand binding induces multimerization, autophosphorylation, and activation of these receptors (3-5). They subsequently phosphorylate Smad1 at Ser463 and Ser465 in the carboxy-terminal motif SSXS, as well as Smad5 and Smad9 (Smad8) at their corresponding sites. These phosphorylated Smads dimerize with the coactivating Smad4 and translocate to the nucleus, where they stimulate transcription of target genes (5).MAP kinases and CDKs 8 and 9 phosphorylate residues in the linker region of Smad1, including Ser206. The phosphorylation of Ser206 recruits Smurf1 to the linker region and leads to the degradation of Smad1 (6). Phosphorylation of this site also promotes Smad1 transcriptional action by recruiting YAP to the linker region (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) constitute a large family of signaling molecules that regulate a wide range of critical processes including morphogenesis, cell-fate determination, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis (1,2). BMP receptors are members of the TGF-β family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors. Ligand binding induces multimerization, autophosphorylation, and activation of these receptors (3-5). They subsequently phosphorylate Smad1 at Ser463 and Ser465 in the carboxy-terminal motif SSXS, as well as Smad5 and Smad9 (Smad8) at their corresponding sites. These phosphorylated Smads dimerize with the coactivating Smad4 and translocate to the nucleus, where they stimulate transcription of target genes (5).MAP kinases and CDKs 8 and 9 phosphorylate residues in the linker region of Smad1, including Ser206. The phosphorylation of Ser206 recruits Smurf1 to the linker region and leads to the degradation of Smad1 (6). Phosphorylation of this site also promotes Smad1 transcriptional action by recruiting YAP to the linker region (7).