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Product listing: TPP1 (D4E2R) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q96AP0 #14667 to Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb (HRP Conjugate), UniProt ID P68431 #14034

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TPP1 is encoded by the the ACD gene, and is one of six core proteins of the shelterin complex (TRF1, TRF2, Rap1, TIN2, POT1 and TPP1) that regulates telomere length and integrity. This nuclear protein complex localizes to telomeres, and protects the natural ends of chromosomes from inappropriate processing by DNA repair pathways (1). TPP1 was identified in screens for proteins that bind TIN2, which is considered to be the central component of the shelterin complex (1). TPP1 contains two protein-protein interaction domains that facilitate shelterin complex function: a carboxy-terminal TIN2-binding domain and a more central POT1-binding domain. Heterodimerization of TPP1 with POT1 promotes binding to single-stranded telomeric DNA, which facilitates telomere elongation and protection by the shelterin complex. The TPP1 protein also contains a TEL patch, a collection of surface amino acids that recruits telomerase and modulates its processivity (2). In addition to playing an important role in normal development (3), TPP1 is implicated in the etiology of selected diseases. For example, mutations in ACD that alter the composition of the TEL patch have been linked to Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome, a clinically severe form of dyskeratosis congenita characterized by hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction, bone marrow failure, and a predisposition to cancer (4,5).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). TPX2, a target of active Ran (RanGTP), is a microtubule nucleating protein. TPX2 is inactive when bound to nuclear importin-alpha. RanGTP activity disrupts this interaction, relieving inhibition of TPX2 (3). TPX2 binding activates Aurora A kinase and promotes its localization to the mitotic spindle (4,5). DNA damage in mitosis leads to loss of interaction between Aurora A and TPX2 and inactivation of Aurora A kinase (6). TPX2 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and knockdown of TPX2 expression in these cells is associated with increased sensitivity to paclitaxel (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). TPX2, a target of active Ran (RanGTP), is a microtubule nucleating protein. TPX2 is inactive when bound to nuclear importin-alpha. RanGTP activity disrupts this interaction, relieving inhibition of TPX2 (3). TPX2 binding activates Aurora A kinase and promotes its localization to the mitotic spindle (4,5). DNA damage in mitosis leads to loss of interaction between Aurora A and TPX2 and inactivation of Aurora A kinase (6). TPX2 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and knockdown of TPX2 expression in these cells is associated with increased sensitivity to paclitaxel (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 antibodies detect antigens present on the surface of human stem, teratocarcinoma, and embryonic germ cells (1). TRA-1-60(S) reacts with a neuraminidase sensitive epitope of a proteoglycan (2,3), while TRA-1-81 reacts with a neuraminidase insensitive epitope on the same antigen. Recently this antigen has been proposed to be a form of the protein podocalyxin (4). TRA-1-60 is also detected in the serum of patients with germ cell tumors (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 antibodies detect antigens present on the surface of human stem, teratocarcinoma, and embryonic germ cells (1). TRA-1-60(S) reacts with a neuraminidase sensitive epitope of a proteoglycan (2,3), while TRA-1-81 reacts with a neuraminidase insensitive epitope on the same antigen. Recently this antigen has been proposed to be a form of the protein podocalyxin (4). TRA-1-60 is also detected in the serum of patients with germ cell tumors (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The family of alkaline phosphatases in humans is comprised of four members: intestinal, placental, placental-like (germ cell type), and tissue nonspecific. The tissue nonspecific isozyme is also known as the liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase due to its expression in these tissues. It is also highly expressed in embryonic stem (ES) and embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells and is lost as these cells undergo differentiation (1,2). The TRA-2-54 (2J) Mouse mAb specifically detects this isozyme and does not detect the other family members, making it a useful tool for tracking the pluripotency status of ES and EC cells in culture.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis mediated by death factors like FasL and TNF-α involves the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to their respective receptors (1). Upon ligand activation to their receptors, Fas and TNF-R1 associate with death domain (DD) containing adaptor proteins FADD (Fas associated death domain) (2,3) and TRADD (TNF-R1 associated death domain) (4). In addition to its carboxy-terminal DD, FADD contains an amino-terminal death effector domain (DED) that binds to DEDs found on caspase-8 which leads to activation of this initiator caspase (5,6). Caspase-8 subsequently activates downstream effector caspases, like caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of proteins involved in the execution of apoptosis. Unlike FADD, TRADD does not contain a DED (4). Apoptosis driven by TNF-R1 binding to TRADD involves association of TRADD and FADD which then leads to activation of caspase-8 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated TRAIL (C92B9) Rabbit mAb #3219.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), also referred to as Apo2 ligand, first identified based on its sequence homology to TNF and Fas/Apo ligand is a member of the TNF family of cytokines and either exists as a type II membrane or soluble protein (1,2). TRAIL induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed cell lines and plays a role in anti-tumor and anti-viral immune surveillance (3). TRAIL signals via binding with death receptors DR4 (TRAIL-R1) (4) and DR5 (TRAIL-R2) (5-8) which can trigger apoptosis as well as NF-κB activation (7,9). Death domains on these receptors leads to the recruitment of a death-induced signaling complex (DISC) leading to caspase-8 and subsequent caspase-3 activation. In addition, TRAIL binds with decoy receptors DcR1 (TRAIL-R3) (10-13) and DcR2 (TRAIL-R4, TRUNDD) (14-15) which lack the functional cytoplasmic death domain antagonizing TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has also been identified as receptor capable of inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis (16). The selectivity of soluble TRAIL at triggering apoptosis in transformed cells as compared to normal cells has led to its investigation as a potential cancer therapeutic (17-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), also referred to as Apo2 ligand, first identified based on its sequence homology to TNF and Fas/Apo ligand is a member of the TNF family of cytokines and either exists as a type II membrane or soluble protein (1,2). TRAIL induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed cell lines and plays a role in anti-tumor and anti-viral immune surveillance (3). TRAIL signals via binding with death receptors DR4 (TRAIL-R1) (4) and DR5 (TRAIL-R2) (5-8) which can trigger apoptosis as well as NF-κB activation (7,9). Death domains on these receptors leads to the recruitment of a death-induced signaling complex (DISC) leading to caspase-8 and subsequent caspase-3 activation. In addition, TRAIL binds with decoy receptors DcR1 (TRAIL-R3) (10-13) and DcR2 (TRAIL-R4, TRUNDD) (14-15) which lack the functional cytoplasmic death domain antagonizing TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has also been identified as receptor capable of inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis (16). The selectivity of soluble TRAIL at triggering apoptosis in transformed cells as compared to normal cells has led to its investigation as a potential cancer therapeutic (17-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transthyretin (TTR) is a highly conserved homotetremric protein that is synthesized in the liver and choroid plexus of the brain. TTR was originally discovered as a protein found in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (1). TTR transports thyroid hormones (TH) and retinol by binding to retinol-binding protein (2). Although TTR is synthesized in the liver and choroid plexus, TTR is detected in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid migrating as monomers, dimers, and tetramers. Beyond its function as a carrier protein of TH and retinol in plasma and CSF, several additional TTR functions have been described, including proteolytic cleavage of specific substrates like apolipoprotein, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and APP (3, 4, 5). These neuronal substrates suggest a functional role for TTR in the central nervous system. Consistent with a CNS function, TTR null mice exhibit memory impairments and altered sensorimotor behavior (6, 7). TTR may also be linked to neurodegenerative disease: TTR levels in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients are negatively correlated with disease progression, and a protective role for TTR, at least in AD mouse models, has been described (8, 9). TTR itself may play a more direct role in disease as gain-of-function mutations in TTR cause the protein to misfold and aggregate into amyloid fibrils, contributing to autosomal dominant hereditary amyloidosis in diseases such as familial amyloid polyneuropathy, familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, and familial leptomeningeal amyloidosis (10). 

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), also known as HSP75, is a mitochondrial chaperone and ATPase that was originally identified as a protein that interacts with the TNF receptor. Although a member of the HSP90 family, TRAP1 is not heat-inducible but is upregulated by glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and UV irradiation. An amino-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence results in localization of TRAP1 within mitochondria (1). Overexpression of TRAP1 decreases oxidative stress, suggesting a protective role in ischemia injury (2). Research studies demonstrate that silencing of TRAP1 enhances cytochrome C release and apoptosis, with additional evidence indicating that TRAP1 can protect cells from cell death by inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (3). TRAP1 is a substrate of the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1, whose corresponding gene is mutated in some forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 protects cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death by suppressing release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. PD-linked PINK1 mutations impair the ability of PINK1 to phosphorylate TRAP1 and leads to impaired cell survival (4). Finally, TRAP1 alleviates α-synuclein induced toxicity and rescues the PINK1 loss-of-function phenotype (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Trans-activation response (TAR) RNA binding protein (TRBP2) was initially discovered as a double stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP) that bound TAR RNA sequences of the HIV-1 virus (1, 2). TRBP2 can bind to and inhibit the phosphorylation of protein kinase PKR, which leads to increased activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (3,4). Along with PACT, TRBP2 is one of the dsRBPs in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), where it plays a critical role in recruiting Ago2 to the miRNA bound by Dicer. (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1) protein is an innate immune receptor that is primarily expressed on the cell surface of myeloid cells (1). TREM1 is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM1, like its related protein TREM2, interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). By accepting a diverse array of ligands, TREM1-expressing macrophages and neutrophils modulate inflammation through cytokine, chemokine, and receptor upregulation (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TREX1 is a broadly expressed 3’ to 5’ exonuclease that acts on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to negatively regulate the interferon-stimulatory DNA (ISD) response (1-4). In humans, there are three TREX1 isoforms generated through alternative splicing with predicted molecular weights of 32, 33, and 39 kDa (2). The transcript for the 33 kDa isoform is the most abundant (2). Mice deficient in TREX1 accumulate intracellular ssDNA, which triggers the ISD response and eventually lethal autoimmunity (3,4). Mutations in TREX1 are associated with autoimmune diseases including Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (5,6). In addition, TREX1 prevents the cell-intrinsic innate immune response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by digesting excess HIV DNA that would normally trigger induction of type I interferon (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Telomeres, the linear ends of chromosomes, are organized into T-loops to prevent them from being recognized by the cell as DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) (1). The telomeric repeat binding factor proteins TRF1 and TRF2 bind to double-stranded telomeres to allow formation of T-loops (2). A large number of proteins involved in the DNA damage response are found physically associated with TRF2 within telomeres (3). Interestingly, TRF2 can transiently localize to DNA damage-induced DSBs, but overexpression of TRF2 prevents ATM-dependent signaling (4). Phosphorylation of TRF2 at Ser323 has been reported in vivo, but no upstream kinase or role has been established for this phosphorylation site (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of lysine residues is a common regulatory posttranslational modification (PTM) that results in the mono-, di-, or tri-methylation of lysine at ε-amine groups by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs). Two PKMT groups are recognized based on structure and catalytic mechanism: class I methyltransferases or seven β strand enzymes, and SET domain-containing class V methyltransferases. Both use the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine to methylate histone and non-histone proteins. Class I methyltransferases methylate amino acids, DNA, and RNA (1,2). Six methyl-lysine-interacting protein families are distinguished based on binding domains: MBT, PHD finger, Tudor, PWWP, WD40 repeat, and chromodomains. Many of these display differential binding preferences based on lysine methylation state (3). KDM1 subfamily lysine demethylases catalyze demethylation of mono- and di-methyl lysines, while 2-oxoglutarate-dependent JmjC (KDM2-7) subfamily enzymes also modify tri-methyl lysine residues (4).Most PKMT substrates are histone proteins and transcription factors, emphasizing the importance of lysine methylation in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression. Lys9 of histone H3 is mono- or di-methylated by G9A/GLP and tri-methylated by SETDB1 to activate transcription. JHDM3A-mediated demethylation of the same residue creates mono-methyl Lys9 and inhibits gene transcription (5). Tumor suppressor p53 is regulated by methylation of at least four sites. p53-mediated transcription is repressed following mono-methylation of p53 at Lys370 by SMYD2; di-methylation at the same residue further inhibits p53 by preventing association with 53BP1. Concomitant di-methylation at Lys382 inhibits p53 ubiquitination following DNA damage. Mono-methylation at Lys382 by SET8 suppresses p53 transcriptional activity, while SET7/9 mono-methylation at Lys372 inhibits SMYD2 methylation at Lys370 and stabilizes the p53 protein. Di-methylation at Lys373 by G9A/GLP inhibits p53-mediated apoptosis and correlates with tri-methylation of histone H3 Lys9 at the p21 promoter (1,6). Overexpression of PKMTs is associated with multiple forms of human cancer, which has generated tremendous interest in targeting protein lysine methyltransferases in drug discovery research.

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb #9733.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb #9733.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb #9733.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb #9733.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).