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Product listing: USP10 (D7A5) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q14694 #8501 to VEGF Receptor 1 (E7T9H) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P17948 #64094

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. USP10 possesses amino acid sequences that match the consensus cysteine and histidine boxes representative of the USP family of deubiquitinating enzymes. At the posttranslational level, USP10 appears to be regulated through both protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation. Indeed, interaction of USP10 with Ras-GAP SH3 domain binding protein (G3BP) has been found to inhibit its ability to catalyze the disassembly of ubiquitin chains (3). Furthermore, ATM-mediated phosphorylation of USP10 at Thr42 and Ser337 was shown to promote USP10 stabilization and redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it functions in p53 deubiquitination, stabilization, and activation in response to genotoxic stress (4). Recently, it was shown that USP10 works in concert with USP13 and Vps34 complexes. USP10, along with USP13, appears to deubiquitinate Vps34 complexes to regulate the levels of this class III PI3K. Beclin-1, another component of these complexes, functions to regulate the stability of USP13, which can deubiquitinate and stabilize the levels of USP10. Therefore, Beclin-1, can indirectly regulate p53 stability by controlling the DUB activity of USP10 (5). USP10 also functions in the endosomal compartment, where it has been shown to deubiquitinate CFTR in order to enhance its endocytic recycling and cell surface expression (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 13 (USP13; isopeptidase T-3) contains four ubiquitin-associated/translation elongation factor EF1B, amino terminal (UBA) domains and one ubiquitin-specific processing protease (UBP) domain. The UBP domain of USP13 contains a catalytic site, a zinc finger domain, and two UBA domains. Similar to other USP family members, USP13 contains cysteines and histidines that are likely involved in its catalytic mechanism. Studies show that USP13 plays a critical role in autophagy through the deubiquitination of target proteins such as BECN1 and USP10 (3). Research also suggests that USP13 is implicated in the pathogenesis of melanoma through its ability to regulate the ubiquitination status of MITF (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. In humans, there are three proteasomal DUBs: PSMD14 (POH1/RPN11), UCH37 (UCH-L5), and Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 14, which is also known as the 60 kDa subunit of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (USP14/TGT60 kDa). USP14 is recruited to the proteasome through its reversible association with the PSMD2 (S2/hRPN1) subunit of the 19S regulatory particle. Whereas PSMD14 appears to promote substrate degradation (3,4), USP14 is thought to antagonize substrate degradation (5-8). While the underlying mechanism for the opposing roles of these two proteasomal DUBs is still uncertain, it is thought that USP14 removes ubiquitin from substrate upon docking of the substrate with the 26S proteasome. Furthermore, USP14 trims ubiquitin residues from the distal end of the polyubiquitin chain, thus decreasing the affinity of the chain for the ubiquitin receptors of the proteasome, and allowing for enhanced substrate stability (6,9,10). Studies have elucidated a physiologic role for USP14 in regulating synaptic activity in mammals (11). Research studies have shown that targeting this activity with small molecule inhibitors has potential benefits for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer (5,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies based on catalytic domain structure: USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 15 (USP15) is a USP subfamily deubiquitinating enzyme with similar domain structure to the paralogous DUBs, USP4, and USP11. The USP15 gene is amplified in glioblastoma and other solid tumors and its high expression correlates with a poor prognosis (3,4). Research studies demonstrate that USP15 is a positive regulator of oncogenic TGF-β signaling and that USP15 deubiquitinates monoubiquitinated R-SMADs to enhance target gene promoter binding (5). USP15 also promotes oncogenic TGF-β signaling by opposing SMURF2-mediated ubiquitination of the type I TGF-β receptor, which facilitates receptor stabilization (3,4). USP15 contributes to oncogenesis by negatively regulating T cell-mediated antitumor responses through the deubiquitination and stabilization of the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2. This observation supports USP15 as a potential target for cancer therapeutics (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action. Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD and JAMM enzymes (1,2). USP18 (also known as UBP43) is a deubiquitinase best known for catalyzing the removal of ISG15, an interferon-regulated ubibiquitin-like protein, from conjugated proteins (3). Removal of ISG15 from target proteins by the USP18 peptidase maintains the critical cellular balance of ISG15-conjugated proteins important for normal development and brain function (4,5). Following induction by IFN or LPS (6), USP18 binds the INF receptor subunit IFNAR2 and inhibits signal transduction through the JAK-STAT pathway (7). USP18 regulation of IFN signaling inhibits IFN-mediated apoptosis and does not necessarily rely on USP18 peptidase activity (8). As the therapeutic use of recombinant IFN can lead to refractory IFN signaling and a less effective response, the combination of IFN treatment and regulation of USP18 expression may produce a more positive outcome (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. The deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8/UBPy) is a cysteine protease belonging to the USP/UBP subfamily. Research studies have shown that USP8 is an essential growth-regulated enzyme indespensible for cell proliferation and survival (3,4). Indeed, conditional knock-out of murine USP8 was shown to promote a dramatic loss in expression of receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR, ErbB3, and c-Met (4). In agreement with these findings, USP8 inactivation leads to enhanced ubiquitination of ligand-activated EGFR (5,6). Furthermore, phosphorylation of USP8 at Ser680 results in its binding of 14-3-3, catalytic inactivation, and reduced EGFR deubiquitination (7). It appears as though USP8, in conjunction with components of the ESCRT-0 complex, plays an integral role in the early endosomal sorting machinery that functions to protect EGFR from lysosomal degradation (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The three members of the UTX/UTY family include the ubiquitously transcribed X chromosome tetratricopeptide repeat protein (UTX), the ubiquitously transcribed Y chromosome tetratricopeptide repeat protein (UTY) and JmjC domain-containing protein 3 (JMJD3) (3). This family of proteins has been shown to demethylate both di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys 27 (4-8). The UTX gene escapes X inactivation in females and is ubiquitously expressed (9). UTX functions to regulate HOX gene expression during development (4-6). JMJD3 functions to regulate gene expression in macrophages responding to various inflammatory stimuli and has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (7,8). Both UTX and JMJD3 interact with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) complexes 2 and 3, both of which have been shown to methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (6,7). The UTY gene is expressed in most tissues in the male mouse (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. These proteins are involved in the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles called autophagosomes that are delivered to lysosomes for degradation.The class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3KC3)/Vps34 regulates vacuolar trafficking as well as autophagy (4,5). Multiple proteins have been shown to be associated with Vsp34, including: p105/Vsp15, Beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg14, and Rubicon, which can determine Vsp34 function (6-11). UVRAG (UV radiation resistance-associated gene) is associated with the Beclin-1/PI3KC3 complex and promotes PI3KC3 enzymatic activity and autophagy, while suppressing proliferation (11). Beclin-1 binding to UVRAG promotes both autophagosome maturation and endocytic trafficking (12). UVRAG is also a potential tumor suppressor protein with frameshift mutations observed in colon and gastric carcinomas (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2, also called synaptobrevin) is part of the R-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex (1). The SNARE complex is involved in vesicular transport and membrane fusion, a process regulated by calcium (2). In neurons, VAMP2 is predominantly inserted in presynaptic vesicle membranes. Assembly of VAMP2 with the plasma membrane SNAREs syntaxin 1 and SNAP25 is a key event necessary for membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release (2). In addition to this important function, VAMP2 is also involved in granule exocytosis in neutrophils (3) and release of bioactive peptides from cardiac myocytes (4) and juxtaglomerular cells (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion by pairing of vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3), also known as cellubrevin, has a broad tissue distribution and localizes to endosomal compartments (3). VAMP3 interacts with the t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP23, and SNAP25 (4,5). Research studies indicate that VAMP3 is involved in transferrin receptor recycling to the plasma membrane (6) and in T-cell receptor recycling to immunological synapses (7). Inhibition of VAMP3 with tetanus toxin impairs membrane trafficking during cell migration (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion that pair vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNARE (t-SNARE) proteins (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP), is a widely expressed v-SNARE involved in exocytosis of granules and synaptic vesicles in various cell types, membrane remodeling, neurite outgrowth, lysosomal secretion, and autophagosome maturation (3). Activity of VAMP7 can be regulated by c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates VAMP7-mediated exocytosis (4). VAMP7 activity can also be regulated through interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Varp (5,6). Several research studies indicate that VAMP7 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth as well as potential neurological activities, including anxiety (7-9). VAMP7 also appears to have a key role in T-cell activation by facilitating the recruitment of vesicular Lat to the immunological synapse (10). The VAMP7 protein interacts with ATG16L, a component of the ATG5-ATG12 complex, and regulates autophagosome maturation through homotypic fusion of ATG16L1 vesicles (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion that pair vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNARE (t-SNARE) proteins (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP), is a widely expressed v-SNARE involved in exocytosis of granules and synaptic vesicles in various cell types, membrane remodeling, neurite outgrowth, lysosomal secretion, and autophagosome maturation (3). Activity of VAMP7 can be regulated by c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates VAMP7-mediated exocytosis (4). VAMP7 activity can also be regulated through interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Varp (5,6). Several research studies indicate that VAMP7 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth as well as potential neurological activities, including anxiety (7-9). VAMP7 also appears to have a key role in T-cell activation by facilitating the recruitment of vesicular Lat to the immunological synapse (10). The VAMP7 protein interacts with ATG16L, a component of the ATG5-ATG12 complex, and regulates autophagosome maturation through homotypic fusion of ATG16L1 vesicles (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Van Gogh-like proteins (VANGL1, VANGL2) are human orthologs of Drosophila Van Gogh (Vang/Stbm), a multi-pass transmembrane protein that is required to establish cell polarity in embryonic eyes, legs, and bristles (1,2). As in Drosophila, mammalian VANGL proteins are core components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway that promotes asymmetric orientation of cells across a planar surface, and drives convergence-extension movements that are critical for tissue morphogenesis (3). Mutations in the human VANGL1 gene have been identified in patients diagnosed with neural tube defects (e.g., spina bifida), providing evidence that VANGL1 plays a role in human embryonic morphogenesis (4,5). These findings are supported by genetic studies in mice, where mutations in both Vangl1 and Vangl2 result in neural tube defects (6,7). A possible role for VANGL in tumor progression is suggested by an increased expression of VANGL1 mRNA in breast cancer patients with an elevated risk of relapse (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Vasopressin is a neuroendocrine peptide that is released to the circulation by magnocellular neurons whose cell bodies are mainly found in the paraventricular and the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. It was first isolated from pituitary gland extracts and synthesized in 1951 (1). Vasopressin acts by activating G protein-coupled, V1a, V1b (also known as V3) and V2 receptors and plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of water homeostasis. One of its main functions is body water retention (2), hence its alternative name antidiuretic hormone or ADH. Vasopressin also leads to increased arterial blood pressure by raising peripheral vascular resistance (3). Vasopressin is also involved in other physiological processes such as acute heart failure (4), pain (5), and metabolic syndrome (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) was originally characterized as a substrate of both cGMP- and cAMP-dependent kinases (PKG and PKA, or cGPK and cAPK, respectively) (1). It is now believed that VASP belongs to the Ena/VASP family of adaptor proteins linking the cytoskeletal system to the signal transduction pathways and that it functions in cytoskeletal organization, fibroblast migration, platelet activation and axon guidance (2,3). Three phosphorylation sites, Ser157, Ser239, and Thr278, have been identified. Ser239 is the major PKG phosphorylation site while Ser157 is the major PKA phosphorylation site (4). Evidence suggests that VASP phosphorylation reduces its association with actin and has a negative effect on actin polymerization (5). Phosphorylation at Ser239 of VASP is a useful marker for monitoring PKG activation and signaling (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VCAM-1 (D8U5V) Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) #39036.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VCAM-1 (D8U5V) Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) #39036.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved and abundant 97 kDa protein that belongs to the AAA (ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. VCP assembles as a homo-hexamer, forming a ring with a channel at its center (1,2,3). VCP homo-hexamers associate with a variety of protein cofactors to form many distinct protein complexes, which act as chaperones to unfold proteins and transport them to specific cellular compartments or to the proteosome (4). These protein complexes participate in many cellular functions, including vesicle transport and fusion, fragmentation and reassembly of the golgi stacks during mitosis, nuclear envelope formation and spindle disassembly following mitosis, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage repair, apoptosis, B- and T-cell activation, NF-κB-mediated transcriptional regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and protein degradation (4). VCP appears to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum; however, tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with relocalization to the centrosome during mitosis (5). In addition, following cellular exposure to ionizing radition, VCP is phosphorylated at Ser784 in an ATM-dependent manner and accumulates in the nucleus at sites of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) (6). Exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents such as UV light, bleomycin or doxorubicin results in phosphorylation of VCP by ATR and DNA-PK in an ATM-independent manner (6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VDAC (D73D12) Rabbit mAb #4661.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VE-Cadherin (D87F2) XP® Rabbit mAb #2500.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).