Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: IRAK Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID O43187 #4769 to DMF (Dimethylformamide) #12767

The IRAK Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine total protein levels of the four Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase family members: IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4.

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

The IRS-1 Inhibition Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate insulin signaling negative feedback loops via phosphorylation of various IRS-1 serine residues. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Jak/Stat Pathway Inhibitors Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several inhibitors of Jak/Stat signaling, including PIAS1, PIAS3, PIAS4, SOCS1, SOCS2, and SOCS3. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
This peptide is used to block Jak1 (6G4) Rabbit mAb #3344 reactivity.

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

This peptide is used to specifically block Jak2 (D2E12) Rabbit mAb #3230 reactivity.

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

The Jumonji Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of Jumonji family proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
Kinase Buffer can be used to assay protein kinase activity.
This peptide is used to block LEF1 (C12A5) Rabbit mAb #2230 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: LEF1 and TCF are members of the high mobility group (HMG) DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that consists of the following: Lymphoid Enhancer Factor 1 (LEF1), T Cell Factor 1 (TCF1/TCF7), TCF3/TCF7L1, and TCF4/TCF7L2 (1). LEF1 and TCF1/TCF7 were originally identified as important factors regulating early lymphoid development (2) and act downstream in Wnt signaling. LEF1 and TCF bind to Wnt response elements to provide docking sites for β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus to promote the transcription of target genes upon activation of Wnt signaling (3). LEF1 and TCF are dynamically expressed during development and aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in many types of cancers including colon cancer (4,5).

The Lipolysis Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of multiple members of the lipolysis pathway, including phosphorylated HSL and perilipin. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western mini-blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit contains antibodies to a variety of housekeeping proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots per primary antibody.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit (HRP Conjugate) contains antibodies directed against a variety of housekeeping proteins. These Cell Signaling Technology antibodies are conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blots.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to detect a variety of housekeeping proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.
The Lysine Acetyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several lysine acetyltrasferases, including: Acetyl-CBP, CBP, GCN5L2, and PCAF. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Lysine Methyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate endogenous levels of lysine methyltransferases. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The MAPKAPK-2 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating levels of MAPKAPK-2 protein phosphorylated at specific sites, as well as total MAPKAPK-2 protein levels. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: In response to cytokines, stress, and chemotactic factors, MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2) is rapidly phosphorylated and activated. It has been shown that MAPKAPK-2 is a direct target of p38 MAPK (1). Multiple residues of MAPKAPK-2 are phosphorylated in vivo in response to stress. However, only four residues (Thr25, Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334) are phosphorylated by p38 MAPK in an in vitro kinase assay (2). Phosphorylation at Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334 appears to be essential for the activity of MAPKAPK-2 (2). Thr25 is phosphorylated by p42 MAPK in vitro, but is not required for the activation of MAPKAPK-2 (2).

The Matrix Remodeling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting different MMPs and TIMPs using the specific corresponding antibodies. The kit contains enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Matrix remodeling is mainly controlled by MMPs and TIMPs. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, matrix structural proteins, and other proteases (1, 2). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP14 (MT1-MMP) have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (3). MMP activity is regulated by mechanisms of both transcriptional control and post translational protein processing. Once synthesized, MMPs exist as latent proenzymes. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full-length protein (4). MMP activity can be inhibited through its binding to endogenously expressed TIMPs. TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases that include TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding MMPs and chelating their zinc cofactor at the catalytic site to inhibit the proteinase function (5,6).

$380
10 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit provides enough reagents to perform up to 10 genomic DNA preparations and 10 IPs from mammalian cells and is optimized for 1 μg of genomic DNA per IP. The SimpleDIP™ protocol can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells. Cells are first lysed and genomic DNA is extracted and sonicated into small fragments (200-500 bp). DNA IPs are performed using 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (HMC31) Mouse mAb and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After elution from the beads, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns provided in the kit. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or next-generation sequencing. The SimpleDIP™ 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine DNA IP Kit provides a highly validated 5-hmC monoclonal antibody to ensure specific and robust signal. The kit also includes DNA that contains exclusively 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, which can be spiked-in to the IPs as a control. Thus, spiked-in DNA will be immunoprecipitated with 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC1) Mouse mAb, but not with the Mouse (G3A1) mAb IgG1 Isotype Control (DIP Formulated). The relative enrichment can then be quantified using the SimpleDIP Hydroxymethyl Control Primers.

Background: DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) is a technique that uses antibodies to immunoenrich for regions of the genome containing modified nucleotides. This assay was first used with a 5-methylcytosine antibody to identify differentially methylated sites within normal and transformed cells (1). Investigators can use the DIP assay to look at specific genomic loci or look across the entire genome by utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS) (2). When performing the DIP assay, cells are first lysed and the nucleic acids are recovered using phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA is then removed by RNase A digestion, and genomic DNA is isolated by a second round of phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The resulting genomic DNA is then fragmented by either restriction enzyme digestion or sonication and subjected to immunoprecipitation (IP) using antibodies specific to the modified nucleotide. Any sequences containing the modified nucleotide will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After IP, the DNA is purified and Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence. Alternatively, the DIP assay can be combined with NGS to provide genome-wide analysis of a specific DNA modification.

$357
10 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleDIP™ Methylated DNA IP (MeDIP) Kit provides enough reagents to perform up to 10 genomic DNA preparations and 10 IPs from mammalian cells and is optimized for 1 μg of genomic DNA per IP. The SimpleDIP™ protocol can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells. Cells are first lysed and genomic DNA is extracted and sonicated into small fragments (200-500 bp). DNA IPs are performed using 5-Methylcytosine (5-mC) (D3S2Z) Rabbit mAb and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After elution from the beads, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns provided in the kit. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or next-generation sequencing. The SimpleDIP™ 5-Methylcytosine DNA IP Kit provides a highly validated 5-mC monoclonal antibody to ensure specific and robust signal. The kit also contains human and mouse control primer sets to regions of the genome that contain 5-methylcytosine. Thus, the IP of genomic DNA with 5-Methylcytosine (5-mC) (D3S2Z) Rabbit mAb will enrich for the sequences amplified by the control primer sets, while the IP with Rabbit (DA1E) mAb XP® Isotype Control (DIP Formulated) will not result in any enrichment.

Background: DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) is a technique that uses antibodies to immunoenrich for regions of the genome containing modified nucleotides. This assay was first used with a 5-methylcytosine antibody to identify differentially methylated sites within normal and transformed cells (1). Investigators can use the DIP assay to look at specific genomic loci or look across the entire genome by utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS) (2). When performing the DIP assay, cells are first lysed and the nucleic acids are recovered using phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA is then removed by RNase A digestion, and genomic DNA is isolated by a second round of phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The resulting genomic DNA is then fragmented by either restriction enzyme digestion or sonication and subjected to immunoprecipitation (IP) using antibodies specific to the modified nucleotide. Any sequences containing the modified nucleotide will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After IP, the DNA is purified and Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence. Alternatively, the DIP assay can be combined with NGS to provide genome-wide analysis of a specific DNA modification.

The Met Signaling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate Met signaling. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots with each antibody.
The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys27 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys36) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys36 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys4) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys79) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys79 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$325
1 ea
The 12-Tube Magnetic Separation Rack is designed for quick and easy small-scale isolation of immunocomplexes using magnetic beads, such as our Protein A (#8687), Protein G (#8740), and ChIP-Grade Protein G (#9006) Magnetic Beads. It can be used with our SimpleChIP® (#9003) and SimpleChIP® Plus (#9005) Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits. The rack holds up to twelve 1.5-2.0 ml tubes and contains six neodymium rare earth permanent magnets.CAUTION: This device contains rare earth magnets that can be extremely powerful. Care should be taken when handling. Keep magnetized parts away from mechanical/electrical instruments that may be damaged by high magnetic fields.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation

$195
1 units
The Magnetic Separation Rack is designed for quick and easy small-scale isolation of immunocomplexes from chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP assays) using SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003 or ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads #9006. The rack holds up to six 1.5-2.0 ml tubes and contains three neodymium rare earth permanent magnets. Rare earth magnets are extremely powerful and should be kept away from mechanical/electrical instruments which may be damaged by high magnetic fields.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation

$140
30 immunoprecipitations
1 ml
ChiP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads are an affinity matrix for the small-scale isolation of immunocomplexes from chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP assays). A truncated form of recombinant Protein G is covalently coupled to agarose beads. Protein G exhibits high affinity for subclasses of IgG from many species (including human, rabbit, mouse, rat and sheep) and can be used for immunoprecipitation assays with these antibodies. The beads are stored in buffer containing BSA (500 µg/ml) and sonicated salmon sperm DNA (200 µg/ml) to block non-specific binding of proteins and DNA during isolation of immunocomplexes. These beads are not compatible with ChIP-seq because the sonicated salmon sperm DNA interferes with downstream sequencing.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected
$190
30 immunoprecipitations
1 ml
ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads are an affinity matrix for the small-scale isolation of immunocomplexes from chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A truncated form of recombinant protein G is covalently coupled to a nonporous paramagnetic particle. Protein G exhibits high affinity for subclasses of IgG from many species (including human, rabbit, mouse, rat and sheep) and can be used for immunoprecipitation assays with these antibodies. The beads are stored in buffer containing BSA (1 mg/ml) to block non-specific binding of proteins and DNA during isolation of immunocomplexes. Beads can be separated from solution using our 6-Tube Magnetic Separation Rack #7017, which concentrates the beads to the side of the tube instead of the bottom. This eliminates centrifugation steps, minimizes sample loss and increases washing efficiency. These beads are compatible with ChIP-seq.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) is a colorless, polar organic solvent widely used as a solvent for chemical reactions. DMF is miscible with water and many other organic solvents. DMF from Cell Signaling Technology is 99.9% pure and is recommended for use as a solvent for the chromogenic substrate X-gal with our Senescence β-Galactosidase Staining Kit #9860. The convenient 10 ml size is more than enough material to dissolve the 150 mg of X-Gal supplied in a single #9860 kit.