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Product listing: YAP/TAZ (D24E4) Rabbit mAb (HRP Conjugate), UniProt ID P46937 #28287 to α-E-Catenin (D9R5E) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P35221 #36611

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated YAP/TAZ (D24E4) Rabbit mAb #8418.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cellular oncogene c-Yes and its viral homologue v-Yes (the transforming gene of Yamaguchi 73 and Esh avian sarcoma viruses) encode a 60 kDa, cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, protein-tyrosine kinase (1). Yes belongs to the Src kinase family and is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues and cells. Like other Src family members, Yes contains several conserved functional domains such as an N-terminal myristoylation sequence for membrane targeting, SH2 and SH3 domains, a kinase domain, and a C-terminal non-catalytic domain (2). Although several lines of evidence support redundancy in signaling between Yes and other Src family kinases, there is also a growing body of evidence indicating specificity in Yes signaling (2). Yes is activated downstream of a multitude of cell surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and cytokine receptors (3). In addition, both Yes and Src kinases are activated during the cell cycle transition from G2 to M phase (3). Investigators have found that dysfunction of Yes is associated with the development of various cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: YKL-40, also known as Chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1), is a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the CHI3L1 gene (1,2). Unlike other members of the chitinase-like protein family, YKL-40 is not an active chitinase. It is produced by activated macrophages, chondrocytes, neutrophils, and synovial cells. It is a pro-inflammatory molecule that contributes to the progression of many inflammatory diseases, including fibrosis, neurodegenerative disease, breast, lung, prostate, liver, bladder, colon, and other types of cancers (3,4). Levels of YKL-40 in serum and plasma in patients with various types of tumors have been reported to predict poor prognosis, and in some clinical assays YKL-40 is being used as a predictive biomarker of cancer outcome (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Zap-70 (D1C10E) XP® Rabbit mAb #3165.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Syk family protein tyrosine kinase Zap-70 is expressed in T and NK cells and plays a critical role in mediating T cell activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement (1). Following TCR engagement, Zap-70 is rapidly phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues through autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by the Src family tyrosine kinase Lck (2-6). Tyrosine phosphorylation correlates with increased Zap-70 kinase activity and downstream signaling events. Expression of Zap-70 is correlated with disease progression and survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ZFX (X-linked zinc finger protein) gene is expressed from the inactive X chromosome and is structurally similar to its homologue on the Y chromosome, ZFY (1). Transcripts of ZFX and ZFY encode proteins composed of a highly acidic amino-terminal domain and a carboxy-terminal zinc-finger motif that is commonly associated with nucleic acid-binding proteins (2). Both ZFY and ZFX are probable transcriptional activators and may function in sex determination (3). Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants of ZFX, encoding different isoforms, have been identified and may be functionally distinct (2). Conditional gene targeting studies in mouse have suggested ZFX is also required for self-renewal of embryonic and hematopoietic stem cells (4). ZFX has also been suggested to play a role in proliferation and expansion of B cells, and could contribute to lymphocyte homeostasis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The solute carrier family 39 (zinc transporter) member 7 (SLC39A7, ZIP7) is an ER and Golgi membrane protein that regulates cellular zinc homeostasis by controlling release of zinc from these organelles to the cytoplasm (1,2). Zinc release mediated by ZIP7 results in activation of protein kinases that are involved in cell proliferation and migration (3,4). The protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates and activates ZIP7 in response to extracellular signals, such as growth factor stimulation (4,5). Increased expression of ZIP7 is observed in breast cancer tissues (6). Research studies indicate that ZIP7 is responsible for activation of multiple tyrosine kinases in aggressive, tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger protein ZPR1 (ZNF259) binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is localized to both cytoplasm and nucleus. The zinc fingers found in ZPR1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR mediate the interaction between ZPR1 and the receptor (1). ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to nucleus following mitogen (i.e. EGF) stimulation (2,3). ZPR1 also interacts with translation elongation factor eEF1A in vivo following EGF treatment (3). The interaction between the zinc finger protein and elongation factor is important for cell proliferation. Cells lacking ZPR1 exhibit abnormal nucleolar function, suggesting that ZPR1 is required for cell viability and nucleolar function in dividing cells (3). ZPR1 knockout mice exhibit significant neurodegeneration, and reduced or altered expression of ZPR1 may contribute to spinal muscular atrophy, a disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord neurons (4).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Actinin (D6F6) XP® Rabbit mAb #6487.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: α-Actinin belongs to the spectrin family of cytoskeletal proteins. It was first recognized as an actin cross-linking protein, forming an antiparallel homodimer with an actin binding head at the amino terminus of each monomer. The α-actinin protein interacts with a large number of proteins involved in signaling to the cytoskeleton, including those involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and immune cell targeting (1). The interaction of α-actinin with intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) helps to promote neurite outgrowth (2). In osteoblasts, interaction of α-actinin with integrins stabilizes focal adhesions and may protect cells from apoptosis (3). The cytoskeletal α-actinin isoforms 1 and 4 (ACTN1, ACTN4) are non-muscle proteins that are present in stress fibers, sites of adhesion and intercellular contacts, filopodia, and lamellipodia. The muscle isoforms 2 and 3 (ACTN2, ACTN3) localize to the Z-discs of striated muscle and to dense bodies and plaques in smooth muscle (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adducins (ADD) are cytoskeleton-associated proteins that help cap the ends of actin filaments, promote association between spectrin and actin, and participate in synapse assembly. The three closely related genes ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3 encode the α-adducin, β-adducin, and γ-adducin proteins (1). Research studies indicate that β-adducin is found at high levels in brain and hematopoietic tissues, whereas both α-adducin and γ-adducin are ubiquitously expressed (2). Adducin protein function is regulated by phosphorylation at a number of sites. Both PKA and PKC can phosphorylate α-adducin at Ser726 and β-adducin at Ser713, which inhibits calmodulin binding and adducin activity (3-5). Additionally, PKA (but not PKC) can phosphorylate β-adducin at Ser408, Ser436, and Ser481, which negatively affects spectrin-actin interactions (3). Phosphorylation of α-adducin at Thr445 and Thr480 by Rho-kinase regulates cell motility and membrane ruffling (6). Finally, CDK-1 phosphorylation of α-adducin at Ser12 and Ser355 during mitosis leads to association of α-adducin with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that α-adducin may play a role in mitotic regulation (7). Because α-adducin plays a role in regulating renal sodium reabsorption, it is not surprising that a number of studies show a relationship between ADD1 genetic polymorphisms and the development of hypertension (8-10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: α-amylase catalyzes the cleavage of 1, 4-α-D-glucosidic bonds in oligosaccharides and polysaccharides (1). The enzyme is normally produced and secreted in salivary glands (salivary α-amylase or AMY1) and pancreas (pancreatic α-amylase or AMY2A) (1). Studies reported the release of an ectopically expressed α-amylase in certain tumors (1). Furthermore, a new type of α-amylase (carcinoid α-amylase or AMY2B) was identified in a lung carcinoid tissue (2-4). The ectopic expression of α-amylase in a neuroendocrine tumor was also reported (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).