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Product listing: Acetyl-Histone H4 (Lys12) Antibody, UniProt ID P62805 #2591 to ALDH1A2 Antibody, UniProt ID O94788 #83805

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Stat3 transcription factor is an important signaling molecule for many cytokines and growth factor receptors (1) and is required for murine fetal development (2). Research studies have shown that Stat3 is constitutively activated in a number of human tumors (3,4) and possesses oncogenic potential (5) and anti-apoptotic activities (3). Stat3 is activated by phosphorylation at Tyr705, which induces dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (6,7). Transcriptional activation seems to be regulated by phosphorylation at Ser727 through the MAPK or mTOR pathways (8,9). Stat3 isoform expression appears to reflect biological function as the relative expression levels of Stat3α (86 kDa) and Stat3β (79 kDa) depend on cell type, ligand exposure, or cell maturation stage (10). It is notable that Stat3β lacks the serine phosphorylation site within the carboxy-terminal transcriptional activation domain (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian imitation SWI (ISWI) complexes are characterized by two ATPase subunits: Snf2h and Snf2l (1). Snf2h interacts with ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1 (ACF1) to comprise the ACF chromatin-remodeling complex (1). ACF1 (BAZ1A) has distinct roles in development (2), regulation of chromatin structure (3), and DNA damage response (4,5). Different developmental stages dictate the expression of ACF1 in Drosophila, and alterations in ACF1 expression during Drosophila development leads to deviation from normal chromatin organization (2). ACF1 functions in heterochromatin formation during development and is involved in the initial establishment of diversified chromatin structures. In vivo studies demonstrate that heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 is enhanced by the interaction of ACF1 with chromatin (6). Chromatin-remodeling factors are required during DNA damage in order to allow signaling molecules and damaging enzymes to access the site (4). Depletion of hACF1 increases apoptosis and vulnerability to radiation and compromises G2/M arrest activated in response to X-ray and UV exposure (4). Depletion of ACF1 also sensitizes cells to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and impairs DNA repair (5). Specifically, accumulation of Ku at DSBs sites may depend on the presence of ACF1 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Acinus (apoptotic chromatin condensation inducer in the nucleus) is a caspase substrate that has been implicated in nuclear changes during apoptosis (1). Chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation are both nuclear morphological features associated with apoptosis. Acinus is expressed in different isoforms (L, S, S') most likely generated by alternative splicing (1). During apoptosis Acinus is cleaved by caspase-3 to generate a 23 kDa fragment that was reported to induce chromatin condensation (1). Acinus has been identified to be a component of the spliceosome complex, ASAP, suggesting a role in pre-mRNA processing (2-4). Down regulation of Acinus by RNA interference inhibits cell growth (5). This study also found that loss of Acinus inhibits DNA fragmentation but not chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aconitase 2 (ACO2) catalyzes the conversion of citrate to isocitrate via cis-aconitate in the second step of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (1,2). ACO2 is also an important regulator of iron homeostasis within cells (1-4). In addition, research studies have shown that this enzyme is deficient in the mitochondrial disease Friedreich's Ataxia (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) catalyzes the ligation of the fatty acid to CoA to form fatty acyl-CoA in a two-step reaction (1). Five isoforms of ACSL have been identified (1). These isoforms have different substrate preferences and subcellular localizations (1). Overexpression of ACSL1 results in changes to fatty acid metabolism in rat primary hepatocytes (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The activin A receptor type 1 (ACVR1) is a membrane associated serine/threonine kinase receptor that binds activin A and related TGF-β superfamily growth factors, including bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4, 6 and 7 (1-3). Functional activin receptors are composed of a pair of type I and type II activin receptor proteins. Following ligand binding, ACVR1 is phosphorylated by its type II binding partner, which allows recruitment and activation of receptor regulated SMAD (R-Smad) proteins (4). Phosphorylation of R-Smad proteins results in their translocation to the nucleus where R-Smads stimulate transcription of target genes (5). Mutations in the corresponding ACVR1 gene are associated with the genetic developmental disorders hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and a metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influence cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins, such as cytokines and growth factors. This process influences cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion and ECM remodeling. Conserved domains found in most ADAM family proteins include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a carboxy-terminal cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The ADAM metallopeptidase domain 10 (ADAM10) is a plasma membrane proteinase that cleaves membrane-bound proteins targeted for regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). The ADAM10 prodomain acts as a chaperone that stabilizes mature ADAM protein folding, and prevents target-protein shedding through inhibition of ADAM10 proteinase activity (3,4). Mature ADAM10 is the major α-secretase responsible for cleavage of Notch, APP, cadherins, and prion protein (5-7). The ADAM10 protein cleaves receptor tyrosine kinases and their associated ligands and displays a wide range of regulatory functions across related signaling pathways (8). Research studies using knockout mice demonstrate that loss of ADAM10 results in defects in cortex formation, lymphocyte development, and cardiovascular development (9-11). Increased ADAM10 protein expression correlates with progression of many types of cancer (i.e. gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and brain glioma), due to increased cancer cell migration, metastasis, and invasion (12-14). Mutations in the corresponding ADAM10 gene result in a rare, autosomal dominant pigmentation disorder known as reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ADAM (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influences cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins such as cytokines and growth factors, by influencing cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by directly remodeling the ECM. Conserved domains in ADAM family members include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The prodomain is thought to aid in protein folding. Disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains mediate adhesion, at least in part, through binding to integrins. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail as well as its interaction with other signaling proteins may influence intra- and extracellular signaling (1). ADAM9 is widely distributed and has been shown to affect migration in skin keratinocytes (3,4). Research studies have shown that ADAM9 is overexpressed in prostate cancer (5), pancreatic cancer (6), gastric cancer (7), and has been linked to invasion and metastasis in small cell lung cancer (8). Research has also shown that an alternatively spliced short (50 kDa) form of ADAM9 containing protease activity is involved in tumor cell invasion (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ADAP (adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein/SLAP-130/Fyb) is an SH3 domain-containing adaptor protein expressed by T cells, NK cells, and myeloid cells (1,2). There are two isoforms of ADAP with predicted molecular weights of 85 kDa and 90 kDa, but observed molecular weights of 120 kDa and 130 kDa (1-3). ADAP was identified as an adaptor protein that interacts with SLP-76 following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and was subsequently found to be important for several aspects of T cell activation (1,2). For example, ADAP is required for integrin-dependent clustering, signaling, and adhesion (4,5). In addition, ADAP interacts with CARMA1 and facilitates assembly of the CARMA1-Bcl10-MALT1 complex important for NF-κB activation downstream of TCR activation (6). Finally, following binding of a T cell to an antigen presenting cell, ADAP forms a ring at the immunological synapse that recruits dynein to enable microtubule-organizing center polarization (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes are grouped into five classes, with three distinct class I ADH genes (ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH1C) and ADH4, ADH5, ADH7 and ADH6 belonging to classes II, III, IV, and V, respectively. ADH is a zinc-containing, dimeric enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of cytosolic alcohol to acetaldehyde in the liver with the coenzyme NAD (1). ADH1A is monomorphic and is the predominant fetal and neonatal liver ADH enzyme. In contrast, polymorphic ADH1B and ADH1C enzymes are predominant in adult livers (2). Polymorphisms in the human class I ADH genes result in functionally variable ADH enzymes; evidence suggests that specific variants may provide protection from the risk of alcoholism (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activator of 90 kDa heat shock protein ATPase homolog 1 (AHSA1 or AHA1) is a 42 kDa HSP90 co-chaperone that stimulates intrinsic HSP90 ATPase activity in eukaryotic cells to facilitate client protein folding and activation (1,2). Initially, HSP90 forms a ternary complex with a nascent client protein such as v-Src, c-Raf or CFTR, and the co-chaperone protein CDC37 (3,4). HSP90 then cycles through a series of conformational changes facilitated by ATP that results in the release of CDC37 and recruitment of AHSA1 - a process that is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation of HSP90 and CDC37 (5). More recently, AHSA1 has been shown to have unique interactions with additional client proteins involved in RNA splicing and DNA repair, suggesting that AHSA1 may have also have a scaffolding role in recruiting client proteins to HSP90 (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an interferon-inducible protein containing an amino-terminal pyrin domain and carboxy-terminal HIN-200 domain that functions in innate immunity and tumor progression (1). Expression of AIM2 can inhibit cell growth and tumor formation (2,3). Furthermore, the AIM2 gene has a high frequency of mutations associated with microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (4). AIM2 has a critical role in the activation of caspase-1, the protease responsible for the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Caspase-1 activation is regulated by multi-protein complexes referred to as “inflammasomes” (5,6). Distinct inflammasome complexes have been described containing NLRP1/NALP1, NLRP3/NALP3, IPAF, and AIM2. The HIN-200 domain of AIM2 is responsible for binding to cytoplasmic double stranded DNA, resulting in caspase-1 activation. (7-9). This inflammasome complex also involves binding of the pyrin domain of AIM2 to the CARD-domain protein ASC/TMS1, which then interacts directly with caspase-1. As a result, AIM2 has been demonstrated to be an important sensor for a number of different pathogens (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ajuba belongs to the Zyxin/Ajuba family, members of which include LIMD1, LPP, Trip6 and Zyxin. Three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus characterize this family of proteins. Zyxin/Ajuba family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton, are components of both cell-cell junction adhesive complex and integrin-mediated adhesive complex, and shuttle in and out of the nucleus (1). Ajuba is involved in Rac activation during cell migration and activates Aurora A in order to commit to mitosis (2-3). Ajuba and its family members also have an amino-terminal proline-rich pre-LIM region, and Ajuba augments ERK activation in a Ras-dependent manner (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2) is a member of a large superfamily of aldo-keto reductases that metabolize an array of substrates in a NADPH-dependent manner. AKR1C2 is the 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) responsible for metabolizing and inactivating the androgen hormone 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to 3α-androstanediol (1). Research studies demonstrate an increase in AKR1C2 expression in cases of advanced prostate cancer (2). Both AKR1C2 and the related reductase, AKR1C3, are implicated in enhancing PI3K/Akt signaling in prostate cancer by reducing prostaglandin D2 to the more stable 9α, 11β-PGF2α (2). In addition, research studies demonstrate an increase in AKR1C2 expression in some ovarian endometriosis specimens, suggesting the participation of AKR1C2 in the promotion of progesterone metabolism in ovarian endometriosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Chicken, D. melanogaster, Dog, Guinea Pig, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in plasma. It accounts for over 50% of total human plasma protein content, having a concentration of approximately 40 g/L. Albumin is predominantly synthesized in the liver and is a major transportation component for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, including fatty acids, steroid hormones, metabolites and drugs. It is also responsible for maintaining colloid osmotic pressure and may affect microvascular integrity (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The aldehyde dehydrogenase family is a large group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidization of aldehydes into carboxylic acids (1). Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A2 (ALDH1A2, RALHD2) is among a group of aldehyde dehydrogenases that catalyze the metabolism of retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), which plays a critically important signaling role in animal development (2). Research studies have shown that ALDH1A2 also plays a role postnatally in modulating the effects of RA signaling on immune cell function (3-5). In one example using a genetic mouse model, it was shown that ALDH1A2-dependent RA signaling was a downstream mediator of NOTCH-dependent T cell differentiation (6).