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Product listing: Bub1b Antibody, UniProt ID O60566 #4116 to CaMKII-α Antibody, UniProt ID Q9UQM7 #3357

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC), which contains Bub1, Bub1b, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, controls chromosome segregation and monitors kinetochore-microtubule interactions (1). During mitosis, the MCC complex inhibits the ubiquitin ligase activity of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), thereby preventing cells with unaligned chromosomes from prematurely entering anaphase (2). Research studies have shown that Bub1b and Bub1 kinases are mutated in several types of human malignancies including hematopoietic, colorectal, lung, and breast cancers (3). Biallelic mutations in Bub1b have been found in mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome and premature chromatid separation syndrome (4). Bub1b mouse germline knockouts are embryonic lethal with heterozygous animals displaying genetic instability, early aging phenotypes, and increased cancer susceptibility (5). Bub3 binds both Bub1 and Bub1b, facilitating their recruitment to kinetochores (6), and is required for functional microtubule-kinetochore interactions (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC), which contains Bub1, Bub1b, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, controls chromosome segregation and monitors kinetochore-microtubule interactions (1). During mitosis, the MCC complex inhibits the ubiquitin ligase activity of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), thereby preventing cells with unaligned chromosomes from prematurely entering anaphase (2). Research studies have shown that Bub1b and Bub1 kinases are mutated in several types of human malignancies including hematopoietic, colorectal, lung, and breast cancers (3). Biallelic mutations in Bub1b have been found in mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome and premature chromatid separation syndrome (4). Bub1b mouse germline knockouts are embryonic lethal with heterozygous animals displaying genetic instability, early aging phenotypes, and increased cancer susceptibility (5). Bub3 binds both Bub1 and Bub1b, facilitating their recruitment to kinetochores (6), and is required for functional microtubule-kinetochore interactions (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved in metazoan evolution. c-Abl protein is distributed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cells. It is implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell adhesion, and stress responses (1-3). c-Abl kinase activity is increased in vivo by diverse physiological stimuli including integrin activation; PDGF stimulation; and binding to c-Jun, Nck, and RFX1 (2,4). The in vivo mechanism for regulation of c-Abl kinase activity is not completely understood. Tyr245 is located in the linker region between the SH2 and catalytic domains. This positioning is conserved among Abl family members. Phosphorylation at Tyr245 is involved in the activation of c-Abl kinase (5). In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr412, which is located in the kinase activation loop of c-Abl, is required for kinase activity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Cbl proto-oncogene is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein that is especially predominant in hematopoietic cells (1,2). c-Cbl is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to stimulation of a variety of cell-surface receptors and becomes associated with a number of intracellular signaling molecules such as protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Crk, and 14-3-3 proteins (3,4). c-Cbl possesses a highly conserved amino-terminal phosphotyrosine binding domain (TKB) and a C3HC4 RING finger motif. The TKB recognizes phosphorylated tyrosines on activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The RING finger motif recruits ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. These two domains are primarily responsible for the ubiquitin ligase activity of c-Cbl and downregulation of RTKs (3). Research studies have indicated that in human cancer tissues, c-Cbl is frequently tyrosine-phosphorylated in a tumor-specific manner (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr731 of c-Cbl provides a docking site for downstream signaling components such as p85 and Fyn (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones. Elevation of blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Proinsulin, the insulin precursor molecule, is processed prior to its secretion. Insulin is composed of A-peptide and B-peptide which are joined by a disulfide bond. The center one-third of the molecule is cleaved and released as C-peptide, which has a longer half-life than insulin (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf (Raf-1) are the main effectors recruited by GTP-bound Ras to activate the MEK-MAP kinase pathway (1). Activation of c-Raf is the best understood and involves phosphorylation at multiple activating sites including Ser338, Tyr341, Thr491, Ser494, Ser497, and Ser499 (2). p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) has been shown to phosphorylate c-Raf at Ser338, and the Src family phosphorylates Tyr341 to induce c-Raf activity (3,4). Ser338 of c-Raf corresponds to similar sites in A-Raf (Ser299) and B-Raf (Ser445), although this site is constitutively phosphorylated in B-Raf (5). Inhibitory 14-3-3 binding sites on c-Raf (Ser259 and Ser621) can be phosphorylated by Akt and AMPK, respectively (6,7). While A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf are similar in sequence and function, differential regulation has been observed (8). Of particular interest, B-Raf contains three consensus Akt phosphorylation sites (Ser364, Ser428, and Thr439) and lacks a site equivalent to Tyr341 of c-Raf (8,9). Research studies have shown that the B-Raf mutation V600E results in elevated kinase activity and is commonly found in malignant melanoma (10). Six residues of c-Raf (Ser29, Ser43, Ser289, Ser296, Ser301, and Ser642) become hyperphosphorylated in a manner consistent with c-Raf inactivation. The hyperphosphorylation of these six sites is dependent on downstream MEK signaling and renders c-Raf unresponsive to subsequent activation events (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors that are critical for cellular differentiation, terminal function, and inflammatory response (1). Six members of the family have been characterized (C/EBPα, β, δ, γ, ε, and ζ) and are distributed in a variety of tissues (1). Translation from alternative start codons results in two isoforms of C/EBPα (p42 and p30), which are both strong transcriptional activators (2). It has been reported that insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I stimulate the dephosphorylation of C/EBPα, which may play a key role in insulin-induced repression of GLUT4 transcription (3). Phosphorylation of C/EBPα at Thr222, Thr226, and Ser230 by GSK-3 seems to be required for adipogenesis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors critical for cellular differentiation, terminal functions and inflammatory response (1). Six members of the family have been characterized (C/EBPα, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε and -ζ) and are distributed in a variety of tissues (1). There are two forms of C/EBPβ, the 38 kDa liver activating protein (LAP) and the 20 kDa liver inhibitory protein (LIP) which may be products of alternative translation. The 38 kDa LAP protein is a transcriptional activator while LIP may act as an inhibitor of C/EBPβ transcriptional activity (2). Phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at distinct sites stimulates its transcriptional activity (3-5). Phosphorylation at serine 105 of rat C/EBPβ, a unique site only present in the rat sequence, seems essential for rat C/EBPβ activation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors that are critical for cellular differentiation, terminal function, and inflammatory response (1). Six members of the family have been characterized (C/EBPα, β, δ, γ, ε, and ζ) and are distributed in a variety of tissues (1). Translation from alternative start codons results in two isoforms of C/EBPα (p42 and p30), which are both strong transcriptional activators (2). It has been reported that insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I stimulate the dephosphorylation of C/EBPα, which may play a key role in insulin-induced repression of GLUT4 transcription (3). Phosphorylation of C/EBPα at Thr222, Thr226, and Ser230 by GSK-3 seems to be required for adipogenesis (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors critical for cellular differentiation, terminal functions and inflammatory response (1). Six members of the family have been characterized (C/EBPα, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε and -ζ) and are distributed in a variety of tissues (1). There are two forms of C/EBPβ, the 38 kDa liver activating protein (LAP) and the 20 kDa liver inhibitory protein (LIP) which may be products of alternative translation. The 38 kDa LAP protein is a transcriptional activator while LIP may act as an inhibitor of C/EBPβ transcriptional activity (2). Phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at distinct sites stimulates its transcriptional activity (3-5). Phosphorylation at serine 105 of rat C/EBPβ, a unique site only present in the rat sequence, seems essential for rat C/EBPβ activation (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, inflammatory response and many other biological events (1,2). Six members of the family have been identified (C/EBPα, β, δ, γ, ε and ζ) and have been shown to distribute in a variety of tissues (1,2). C/EBPδ is highly expressed in adipose tissue, lung and intestine (2). C/EBPs play an important role in positively regulating adipogenesis (2,3) and C/EBPδ mRNA levels are enhanced during this process (3). C/EBPδ is also expressed in the mammalian nervous system (2) and has been shown to play an important role in long-term memory (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: C1QBP, also referred to as p32, p33, gC1q receptor (gC1qR), and hyaluronic acid binding protein 1 (HABP1), was originally identified via its binding interactions with Splicing Factor (SF-2) (1). Multiple, diverse binding partners of C1QBP were subsequently identified, including the globular heads of complement component C1q, hyaluronic acid, selected protein kinases (2), the tumor suppressor ARF (3-5), and multiple antigens of bacterial and viral origin (6). Research studies have shown that C1QBP is overexpressed in a number of cancer cell types (7), and has been implicated in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells shift their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (7). C1QBP has also been shown to inhibit the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition (MPT) pore, possibly serving a protective function against damage from oxidative stress (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The expansion of hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeats in the C9orf72 gene causes chromosome 9p-linked neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (1,2). The specific mechanism by which of these repeats contributes to disease etiology is currently an active area of investigation (3). Several gain of function mechanisms have been proposed. These mechanisms include toxicity from C9orf72 RNA containing the hexanucleotide repeats (4) and toxicity generated from dipeptide repeat proteins produced by repeat-associated non-ATG translation (5). In addition to gain of function mechanisms, the genetic hexanucleotide repeat expansions may cause a loss of function of the C9orf72 protein. C9orf72 contains a predicted DENN (differentially expressed in normal and neoplastic cells) domain that typically functions as guanine exchange factors for Rab GTPases, proteins that play key regulatory roles in membrane trafficking (6). Consistent with C9orf72 normally functioning in membrane trafficking, biochemical and genetic studies revealed that C9orf72 forms a protein complex with Sim-Magenis chromosome region 8 (SMCR8) and WD repeat-containing protein 41 (WDR41) to regulate the autophagy-lysosomal pathway (7), suggesting that C9orf72-dependent alterations in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway might contribute to ALS/FTD pathology.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Carbonic anhydrases (CA) are a family of ancient zinc metalloenzymes found in almost all living organisms. All CA can be divided into 3 distinct classes (α, β, and γ) that evolved independently and have no significant homology in sequence and overall folding. All functional CA catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 into HCO3- and H+ and contain a zinc atom in the active sites essential for catalysis. There are many isoforms of CA in mammals and they all belong to the α class (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CACYBP/SIP) is a component of the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that also contains Siah1, Skp1, and Ebi (1). CACYBP regulates β-catenin turnover and plays an important role in thymocyte development (2). CACYBP also binds to tubulin and may be involved in cytoskeletal regulation (3,4). It is highly expressed in neurons, and its cellular localization may be regulated by Ca2+ (5,6). Retinoic acid treatment of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induces translocation of CACYBP to the nucleus and seems to be correlated with phosphorylation of CACYBP on serine residues (7). Recent studies also suggest that CACYBP may possess phosphatase activity (8), and that it can bind and dephosphorylate Erk1/2 (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caldesmon-1 is an actin filament stabilizing protein involved in the regulation of cell contraction. Binding of caldesmon-1 to actin is weakened by phosphorylation and by calmodulin in the presence of calcium. Caldesmon-1 is encoded by a single gene, which is spliced to generate a widely distributed low molecular weight form and a smooth muscle specific high molecular weight form (1,2). Caldesmon-1 is phosphorylated by the cyclin dependent kinase cdc2 and Erk1/2 MAP kinase, both of which prevent the activity of caldesmon-1 (3-5). Phosphorylation of caldesmon-1 by cdc2 is required for passage of cells through mitosis (6). Phosphorylation by Erk1/2 is important in regulating smooth muscle contraction (7). Caldesmon-1 activity may play a role in the formation of podosomes, adhesion complexes associated with the secretion of matrix metalloproteases, invasion, and metastasis (reviewed in 5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calmodulin is a ubiquitously expressed small protein mediating many cellular effects such as short-term and long-term memory, nerve growth, inflammation, apoptosis, muscle contraction and intracellular movement (1). Upon binding of four Ca2+ ions, calmodulin undergoes conformational changes, allowing this complex to bind to and activate many enzymes including protein kinases, protein phosphatases, ion channels, Ca2+ pumps, nitric oxide synthase, inositol triphosphate kinase, and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (2,3). Since calmodulin binds Ca2+ in a cooperative fashion, small changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels lead to large changes in the level of active calmodulin and its target proteins (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Secretory and transmembrane proteins are synthesized on polysomes and translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are often modified by the formation of disulfide bonds, amino-linked glycosylation and folding. To help proteins fold properly, the ER contains a pool of molecular chaperones including calnexin. Calnexin was first identified as being involved in the assembly of murine class I histocompatibility molecules (1,2). Calnexin is a calcium-binding protein embedded in the ER membrane that retains the newly synthesized glycoproteins inside the ER to ensure proper folding and quality control (3-5). The specificity of calnexin for a subset of glycoproteins is defined by a lectin site, which binds an early oligosaccharide intermediate on the folding glycoprotein (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 in a calcium dependent manner (2). In particular, calpastatin binds and inhibits calpain when calcium levels are high and is released when calcium levels go down. Calpastatin contains five domains, a unique N-terminal domain L with no inhibitory effects and four homologous domains (CAST 1-4) that can inhibit heterodimeric calpain 1 and 2 (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calcium is a universal signaling molecule involved in many cellular functions such as cell motility, metabolism, protein modification, protein folding, and apoptosis. Calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it is buffered by calcium binding chaperones such as calnexin and calreticulin, and is released via the IP3 Receptor channel (1). Calreticulin also functions as an ER chaperone that ensures proper folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. As such, calreticulin presumably does not alter protein folding but regulates proper timing for efficient folding and subunit assembly. Furthermore, calreticulin retains proteins in non-native conformation within the ER and targets them for degradation (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) family, which is activated in response to elevation of intracellular Ca2+, includes CaMKI, CaMKII, CaMKIV and CaMK-kinases (CaMKKs) (1,2). CaMKI is a downstream substrate of CaMKK and has 4 isoforms: CaMKI-α, CaMKI-β, CaMKI-γ and CaMKI-δ. CaMKI is present in most cell types and may be involved in cellular functions including transcription, cytoskeletal organization, axonal growth cone motility and long-term potentiation in neurons (3-6). CaMKII is also ubiquitously expressed in most cell types. While muscular CaMKII has been linked to activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle hypertrophy response, neuronal CaMKII regulates important neuronal functions, including neurotransmitter synthesis, neurotransmitter release, modulation of ion channel activity, cellular transport, cell morphology and neurite extension, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and gene expression (7). Like CaMKI, CaMKIV is also a substrate of CaMKKs and is primarily restricted to the nucleus of neurons. CaMKIV regulates gene transcription in neurons through phosphorylation of transcription factors such as CREB and is required for fear memory (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).