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Product listing: DUSP6/MKP3 Antibody, UniProt ID Q16828 #39441 to eIF2α Antibody, UniProt ID P05198 #9722

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MAP kinases are inactivated by dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DUSPs) that differ in their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, inducibility by extracellular stimuli, and cellular localization. DUSPs, also known as MAPK phosphatases (MKP), specifically dephosphorylate both threonine and tyrosine residues in MAPK P-loops and have been shown to play important roles in regulating the function of the MAPK family (1,2). At least 13 members of the family (DUSP1-10, DUSP14, DUSP16, and DUSP22) display unique substrate specificities for various MAP kinases (3). MAPK phosphatases typically contain an amino-terminal rhodanese-fold responsible for DUSP docking to MAPK family members and a carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (4). These phosphatases can play important roles in development, immune system function, stress responses, and metabolic homeostasis (5). In addition, research studies have implicated DUSPs in the development of cancer and the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins are important intermediates of Wnt signaling pathways. Dsh inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3β promoting β-catenin stabilization. Dsh proteins also participate in the planar cell polarity pathway by acting through JNK (1,2). There are three Dsh homologs, Dvl1, Dvl2 and Dvl3 in mammals. Upon treatment with Wnt proteins, Dvls become hyperphosphorylated (3) and accumulate in the nucleus (4). Dvl proteins also associate with actin fibers and cytoplasmic vesicular membranes (5) and mediate endocytosis of the Fzd receptor after Wnt protein stimulation (6). Overexpression of Dvl has been reported in certain cancers (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins are important intermediates of Wnt signaling pathways. Dsh inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3β promoting β-catenin stabilization. Dsh proteins also participate in the planar cell polarity pathway by acting through JNK (1,2). There are three Dsh homologs, Dvl1, Dvl2 and Dvl3 in mammals. Upon treatment with Wnt proteins, Dvls become hyperphosphorylated (3) and accumulate in the nucleus (4). Dvl proteins also associate with actin fibers and cytoplasmic vesicular membranes (5) and mediate endocytosis of the Fzd receptor after Wnt protein stimulation (6). Overexpression of Dvl has been reported in certain cancers (7,8).

$305
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$305
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin is a family of large GTPases that has been implicated in the formation of vesicles of both the endocytotic and secretory processes (1). Dynamin plays an important role in the internalization of cell surface receptors, a process that attenuates the response to extracellular signals. It has been illustrated that dynamin interacts with signaling proteins such as Src, PLCγ, PKC and G-proteins. PKC and Src phosphorylate dynamin, and its phosphorylation may regulate the endocytosis of cell surface receptors (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dysbindin, or dystrobrevin-binding protein 1, is a coiled-coil-containing protein expressed in muscle and brain that was identified as a binding partner of dystrobrevin (1). Dysbindin upregulates expression of the pre-synaptic proteins SNAP25 and synapsin I, thereby increasing glutamate release and promoting neuronal viability through Akt signaling. In particular, Akt phosphorylation is suppressed with downregulation of dysbindin and increased with upregulation of dysbindin (2). A nonsense mutation of dysbindin causes Hermansky-Pudlak disease, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lysosomal storage defects and prolonged bleeding. (2). Genetic variation in the gene encoding dysbindin is strongly associated with schizophrenia and protein levels are reduced in the prefrontal cortex, midbrain and hippocampus of brains from patients with schizophrenia (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination requires the concerted action of the E1, E2, and E3 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. Ubiquitin is first activated through ATP-dependent formation of a thiol ester with ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The activated ubiquitin is then transferred to a thiol group of ubiquitin-carrier enzyme E2. The final step is the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 to an ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue, which is mediated by ubiquitin-ligase enzyme E3 (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: E2A is a member of the E-protein family of transcription factors, a subclass of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that bind specifically to E-box consensus sequences (1,2). Alternative splicing generates two E2A isoforms (E47 and E12) that are actively involved in B cell lineage commitment, B cell maturation, IgK V-J rearrangement, peripheral B cell development, and tumor suppression (3). E2A acts in cis during G1 to promote immunoglobulin gene diversification (4). Research studies have shown that chromosomal translocations involving the E2A gene result in the expression of multiple fusion proteins and are associated with many cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The E2F transcription factors are essential for regulation of the cell cycle (1,2). Physiological E2F is a heterodimer composed of an E2F subunit together with a DP subunit (3, 4). Six members of the E2F family have been identified, and each E2F subunit has a DNA binding and a dimerization domain. E2F-1 to -5 activate transcription. E2F-1 to -3 bind pRb, and E2F-4 and -5 bind p107 or p130, and these interactions are under cell cycle control (5-8). E2F-1 has oncogenic properties in vivo and in vitro. E2F-1 can induce apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E2F-1 is stress-responsive, and is regulated by a PI3-kinase-like kinase family such as the ATM/ATR kinases (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Enhancer of mRNA decapping 4 (EDC4) was originally identified as the autoantigen Ge-1 from a Sjögren's syndrome patient later diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (1). EDC4 (also known as HEDLS) was later identified as an essential component of cytoplasmic P-bodies responsible for mRNA decapping and degradation (2). Identified EDC4 protein is found as a pair of isoforms generated by alternative splicing and contains several WD domains and a putative nuclear localization signal. EDC4 co-localizes with other P-body decapping proteins such as DCP1A, DCP2 and GW182 (2,3). Experimental evidence suggests that EDC4 may be involved in miRNA-mediated translation repression (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EEA1 is an early endosomal marker and a Rab5 effector protein essential for early endosomal membrane fusion and trafficking (1-2). The carboxy terminus of EEA1 contains a FYVE domain which binds to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P), targeting EEA1 to early endosomes (3). The stable association of EEA1 with the endosomal membrane is regulated by PI3 kinase, Rab5 and calcium/calmodulin (4-6). Once on the membrane, EEA1 interacts with Rab5, NSF and syntaxin 13 to promote early endosomal membrane docking and fusion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (5). Embryonic ectoderm development protein (EED) is a component of the PRC2 complex, which together with Ezh2 and SUZ12 is absolutely required for histone methyl-transferase activity (6). EED, SUZ12 and EZH2 are overexpressed in various types of cancer, including tumors of the colon, breast, prostate and ovary (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Translation is the process where amino acid residues are assembled into polypeptides on ribosomes. This process is generally divided into three stages: initiation, elongation and termination. During elongation, mRNA and tRNA pair at the two active sites (A and P sites) on the ribosome. A number of eukaryotic elongation factors (eEFs) are involved in this process in mammalian cells (1). eEF1A, also called elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), binds GTP and interacts with amino acyl-tRNAs to promote recruitment of amino acyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome (1). After GTP hydrolysis, GDP-eEF1A leaves the ribosome and is later converted back to the GTP-eEF1A by eEF1B (1). Studies have shown that eEF1A is phosphorylated under certain conditions, indicating that its activity is regulated at the post-translational level (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site on the ribosome. It has been shown that phosphorylation of eEF2 at threonine 56 by eEF2 kinase inhibits its activity (1-4). eEF2 kinase is normally dependent on Ca2+ ions and calmodulin (5,6). eEF2 kinase can also be activated by PKA in response to elevated cAMP levels (7-9), which are generally increased in stress- or starvation-related conditions. A variety of treatments known to raise intracellular Ca2+ or cAMP levels have been shown to result in increased phosphorylation of eEF2, and thus to inhibit peptide-chain elongation. The inactive phosphorylated eEF2 can be converted to its active nonphosphorylated form by a protein phosphatase, most likely a form of protein phosphatase-2A (PP-2A). Insulin, which activates protein synthesis in a wide range of cell types, induces rapid dephosphorylation of eEF2 through mTOR signaling and may involve modulation of the activity of the PP-2A or the eEF2 kinase or both (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2k) phosphorylates and inactivates eEF2, resulting in the inhibition of peptide-chain elongation (1). eEF2k is normally dependent on Ca2+ ions and calmodulin (2,3). It can be activated by PKA in response to elevated cAMP levels (4-6), which are generally increased in stress- or starvation-related conditions. eEF2k can also be regulated in response to a wide range of stimuli that promote cell growth and protein synthesis. This involves the phosphorylation of eEF2k by p90RSK and p70 S6 kinase at Ser366 or by SAPK4/p38delta at Ser359, leading to the inactivation of eEF2k (7,8), which facilitates the dephosphorylation of eEF2, and thus promotes translation.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eg5 (also called kinesin-like protein 11 or Kif11) belongs to the kinesin-like family of motor proteins important in chromosome positioning, centrosome separation, and mitotic spindle formation. Phosphorylation of Eg5 by mitotic kinases regulates its activity by modulating its association with microtubules (1,2). Because anti-mitotic chemotherapeutic drugs, such as taxanes, target microtubules and have pleiotropic and sometimes toxic effects, drugs that target microtubule-associated proteins such as Eg5 are currently in development (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Early growth response 3 (EGR3) is a zinc finger transcription factor and one of four members of the early growth response family (1). Members of this family are basally expressed in the brain (2) and are immediate early response genes that are important for the induction of cellular programs of differentiation, proliferation, and cell death in response to environmental stimuli (1). EGR3 plays important roles in cellular growth and neuronal development (2) and an essential role in learning and memory processing of both short- and long-term hippocampus-dependent memory; it also mediates adaptation to stress and novelty (3). Research studies show that a lack of EGR3 results in abnormal neuronal and T cell development (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) α subunit is a well-documented mechanism to downregulate protein synthesis under a variety of stress conditions. eIF2 binds GTP and Met-tRNAi and transfers Met-tRNA to the 40S subunit to form the 43S preinitiation complex (1,2). eIF2 promotes a new round of translation initiation by exchanging GDP for GTP, a reaction catalyzed by eIF2B (1,2). Kinases that are activated by viral infection (PKR), endoplasmic reticulum stress (PERK/PEK), amino acid deprivation (GCN2), or heme deficiency (HRI) can phosphorylate the α subunit of eIF2 (3,4). This phosphorylation stabilizes the eIF2-GDP-eIF2B complex and inhibits the turnover of eIF2B. Induction of PKR by IFN-γ and TNF-α induces potent phosphorylation of eIF2α at Ser51 (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) α subunit is a well-documented mechanism to downregulate protein synthesis under a variety of stress conditions. eIF2 binds GTP and Met-tRNAi and transfers Met-tRNA to the 40S subunit to form the 43S preinitiation complex (1,2). eIF2 promotes a new round of translation initiation by exchanging GDP for GTP, a reaction catalyzed by eIF2B (1,2). Kinases that are activated by viral infection (PKR), endoplasmic reticulum stress (PERK/PEK), amino acid deprivation (GCN2), or heme deficiency (HRI) can phosphorylate the α subunit of eIF2 (3,4). This phosphorylation stabilizes the eIF2-GDP-eIF2B complex and inhibits the turnover of eIF2B. Induction of PKR by IFN-γ and TNF-α induces potent phosphorylation of eIF2α at Ser51 (5,6).