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Product listing: HS1 Antibody (Rodent Specific), UniProt ID P49710 #4557 to IKKβ (L570) Antibody, UniProt ID O14920 #2678

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: All organisms respond to increased temperatures and other environmental stresses by rapidly inducing the expression of highly conserved heat shock proteins (HSPs) that serve as molecular chaperones to refold denatured proteins and promote the degradation of damaged proteins. Heat shock gene transcription is regulated by a family of heat shock factors (HSFs), transcriptional activators that bind to heat shock response elements (HSEs) located upstream of all heat shock genes (1). HSEs are highly conserved among organisms and contain multiple adjacent and inverse iterations of the pentanucleotide motif 5'-nGAAn-3'. HSFs are less conserved and share only 40% sequence identity. Vertebrate cells contain four HSF proteins: HSF1, 2 and 4 are ubiquitous, while HSF3 has only been characterized in avian species. HSF1 induces heat shock gene transcription in response to heat, heavy metals, and oxidative agents, while HSF2 is involved in spermatogenesis and erythroid cell development. HSF3 and HSF4 show overlapping functions with HSF1 and HSF2. The inactive form of HSF1 exists as a monomer that localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, but does not bind DNA (1,2). In response to stress, HSF1 becomes phosphorylated, forms homotrimers, binds DNA and activates heat shock gene transcription (1,2). HSF1 activity is positively regulated by phosphorylation of Ser419 by PLK1, which enhances nuclear translocation, and phosphorylation of Ser230 by CaMKII, which enhances transactivation (3,4). Alternatively, HSF1 activity is repressed by phosphorylation of serines at 303 and 307 by GSK3 and ERK1, respectively, which leads to binding of 14-3-3 protein and sequestration of HSF1 in the cytoplasm (5,6). In addition, during attenuation from the heat shock response, HSF1 is repressed by direct binding of Hsp70, HSP40/Hdj-1, and HSF binding protein 1 (HSBP1) (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol, the rate-limiting step in lipolysis. Lipolytic stimuli activate adenylyl cyclase and thus increase intracellular cAMP levels, which in turn activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA phosphorylates HSL at Ser563, Ser659, and Ser660, which stimulates HSL activity (1,2). In contrast, AMPK phosphorylates HSL at Ser565, which reduces HSL phosphorylation at Ser563 by PKA and inhibits HSL activity (2,3). Recent work indicates that phosphorylation at Ser600 by p44/42 MAPKs also enhances the enzymatic activity of HSL (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 is one of the small HSPs that are constitutively expressed at different levels in various cell types and tissues. Like other small HSPs, HSP27 is regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels (1). In response to stress, the HSP27 expression increases several-fold to confer cellular resistance to the adverse environmental change. HSP27 is phosphorylated at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82 by MAPKAPK-2 as a result of the activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway (2,3). Phosphorylation of HSP27 causes a change in its tertiary structure, which shifts from large homotypic multimers to dimers and monomers (4). It has been shown that phosphorylation and increased concentration of HSP27 modulates actin polymerization and reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP40 and HSP40-like proteins represent a large family of chaperone proteins that are homologous to E. coli DnaJ protein (1). These proteins are classified into three subtypes based on their structures. The common feature of the family is a conserved J domain, which is usually located at the amino terminus of proteins and responsible for their association with HSP70 (1,2). Human HSP40, also known as Hdj1, belongs to subtype II that contain a unique Gly/Phe-rich region (2). HSP40 family proteins bind unfolded proteins, prevent their aggregation, and then deliver them to HSP70 (2,3). Another major function of HSP40 is to stimulate ATPase activity of HSP70, which causes conformational change of the unfolded proteins (4,5). The HSP40-HSP70-unfolded protein complex further binds to co-chaperones Hip, Hop and HSP90 or components of the protein degradation machinery such as CHIP and BAG-1, which either leads to protein folding or degradation, respectively (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells the misfolding and aggregation of proteins during biogenesis and under conditions of cellular stress are prevented by molecular chaperones (1-3). HSP60 has primarily been known as a mitochondrial protein that is important for folding key proteins after import into the mitochondria (4). Research studies have shown that a significant amount of HSP60 is also present in the cytosol of many cells, and that it is induced by stress, inflammatory and immune responses, and autoantibodies correlated with Alzheimer's, coronary artery diseases, MS, and diabetes (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells the misfolding and aggregation of proteins during biogenesis and under conditions of cellular stress are prevented by molecular chaperones (1-3). HSP60 has primarily been known as a mitochondrial protein that is important for folding key proteins after import into the mitochondria (4). Research studies have shown that a significant amount of HSP60 is also present in the cytosol of many cells, and that it is induced by stress, inflammatory and immune responses, and autoantibodies correlated with Alzheimer's, coronary artery diseases, MS, and diabetes (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The heat shock protein HSPA4 (Apg-2, HSP70RY) is a member of the heat-shock protein 110 (Hsp 110) subfamily of Hsp70 heat-shock proteins (1). Apg-2 has chaperone ability similiar to Hsp110, and it plays a role under non-stress conditions (2). Apg-2 interacts with TJP1/ZO-1 and functions as a regulator of ZO-1-ZONAB signaling in epithelial cells in response to cellular stress (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSPB8 (HSP22) is a member of the small heat shock protein superfamily and the human protein is most closely related to HSP27. Similar to most other small HSPs (sHSPs), HSPB8 is predominantly transcribed in skeletal muscle and heart (1). In a two hybrid screen, HSPB8 interacted preferentially with a triple aspartate form of HSP27 which mimics HSP27 phosphorylated at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82, as compared to wild-type HSP27 (2). HSPB8 has two binding domains (N- and C-terminal) that are specific for different binding partners, and has the ability to bind to itself and other sHSPs such as HSPB7 and HSPB2 (3). The chaperone-like activity is of great importance to the function of HSP22 in various processes including proliferation, apoptosis and macroautophagy (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The HIV-1 Tat interactive protein 2 (HTATIP2, TIP30, CC3) is an oxidoreductase that was originally identified as a metastatic tumor suppressor and Tat-mediated proapoptotic gene transcription cofactor (1,2). HTATIP2 protein contains a short-chain dehydrogenase (SDR) domain and a NADPH binding motif important for HTATIP2 interaction with importins and inhibition of nucleocytoplasmic transport (3,4). Research studies demonstrate that induced overexpression of HTATIP2 predisposes cells to apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear transport of important signaling proteins (e.g. p53, activated notch1) and several key targets of the DNA repair process (5-7). HTATIP2 is part of a protein complex, with Rab5a, endophilin B1, and ACSL4, that may regulate EGFR receptor endosomal trafficking, degradation, and cytoplasmic/nuclear signaling (8,9). Silencing of HTATIP2 promotes tumor cell survival under low glucose conditions by inducing increased expression of mitochondrial respiratory proteins and glucose metabolic enzymes (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2)/Omi is a serine protease with homology to the E. coli HtrA protein (DegP) and is thought to be involved in apoptosis and stress-induced degradation of misfolded proteins (1). While HtrA2 was orignally identified to be present in either the nucleus (1) or endoplasmic reticulum (2), subsequent studies have shown that it localizes in mitochondria and is released during apoptosis (3-8). HtrA2 is produced as a 50 kDa zymogen that is cleaved to generate a 36 kDa mature protein that exposes an amino terminal motif (AVPS) resembling that of the IAP inhibitor Smac/Diablo (3-8). Like Smac, interaction between HtrA2 and IAP family members, such as XIAP, antagonizes their inhibition of caspase activity and protection from apoptosis (3-8). Interestingly, HtrA2 knock-out mice did not show signs of reduced apoptosis, but rather had a loss of neurons in the striatum and a Parkinson's-like phenotype, suggesting that HtrA2 might have a neuroprotective function (9-11). This activity is associated with the protease activity of HtrA2 (9). Furthermore, research studies have shown that loss of function mutations in the HtrA2 gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia up-regulated protein 1 (HYOU1, ORP150) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident stress protein whose expression is upregulated in response to a variety of environmental conditions that promote ER stress (1,2). The amino-terminal region of HYOU1 displays extensive similarity to the ATPase domain of HSP70 family proteins, suggesting that HYOU1 contributes to maintaining proper protein folding and secretion under conditions that promote ER stress (2). Research studies have demonstrated that HYOU1 is cytoprotective and is involved in the inhibition of hypoxia-induced cell death (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: IDH1 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes exist in two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ respectively, as an electron acceptor (1). IDH1 is the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase found in the cytoplasm and peroxisomes. IDH2 and 3 are mitochondrial enzymes that also function in the Krebs cycle. IDH1 is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser113 and contains a clasp-like domain wherein both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock (2,3). IDH1 is expressed in a wide range of species and also in organisms that lack a complete citric acid cycle. Mutations in IDH1 have been reported in glioblastoma (4), acute myeloid leukemia (5,6), and other malignancies (7). IDH1 appears to function as a tumor suppressor that, when mutationally inactivated, contributes to tumorigenesis in part through induction of the HIF-1 pathway (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) family members are composed of short amino- and carboxy-termini, two transmembrane domains, and a cytoplasmic domain (1). There are four family members in humans: IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, and IFITM5 (2,3). Mice have two additional family members, IFITM6 and IFITM7 (2,3). Basal expression of IFITM proteins is observed in some cells and expression can also be induced by type I and type II interferons (4-6). The primary function of IFITM family proteins appears to be viral restriction, as IFITM proteins inhibit cytosolic entry of viruses by preventing fusion of viral and host membranes (7,8). The mechanism by which IFITM proteins inhibit fusion is unclear. Although IFITM proteins are present on both the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, they most effectively restrict viral fusion in late endosomes and lysosomes (8,9). In addition, different family members exhibit specific viral preferences (9). For example, IFITM3 is most effective at restricting influenza A infection, while IFITM1 is more successful in controlling filoviruses and SARS (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) family members are composed of short amino- and carboxy-termini, two transmembrane domains, and a cytoplasmic domain (1). There are four family members in humans: IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, and IFITM5 (2,3). Mice have two additional family members, IFITM6 and IFITM7 (2,3). Basal expression of IFITM proteins is observed in some cells and expression can also be induced by type I and type II interferons (4-6). The primary function of IFITM family proteins appears to be viral restriction, as IFITM proteins inhibit cytosolic entry of viruses by preventing fusion of viral and host membranes (7,8). The mechanism by which IFITM proteins inhibit fusion is unclear. Although IFITM proteins are present on both the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, they most effectively restrict viral fusion in late endosomes and lysosomes (8,9). In addition, different family members exhibit specific viral preferences (9). For example, IFITM3 is most effective at restricting influenza A infection, while IFITM1 is more successful in controlling filoviruses and SARS (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IFN-γ plays key roles in both the innate and adaptive immune response. IFN-γ activates the cytotoxic activity of innate immune cells, such as macrophages and NK cells (1,2). IFN-γ production by NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs) promotes cell-mediated adaptive immunity by inducing IFN-γ production by T lymphocytes, increasing class I and class II MHC expression, and enhancing peptide antigen presentation (1). The anti-viral activity of IFN-γ is due to its induction of PKR and other regulatory proteins. Binding of IFN-γ to the IFNGR1/IFNGR2 complex promotes dimerization of the receptor complexes to form the (IFNGR1/IFNGR2)2 -IFN-γ dimer. Binding induces a conformational change in receptor intracellular domains and signaling involves Jak1, Jak2, and Stat1 (3). The critical role of IFN-γ in amplification of immune surveillance and function is supported by increased susceptibility to pathogen infection by IFN-γ or IFNGR knockout mice and in humans with inactivating mutations in IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. IFN-γ also appears to have a role in atherosclerosis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IFN-γ plays key roles in both the innate and adaptive immune response. IFN-γ activates the cytotoxic activity of innate immune cells, such as macrophages and NK cells (1,2). IFN-γ production by NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs) promotes cell-mediated adaptive immunity by inducing IFN-γ production by T lymphocytes, increasing class I and class II MHC expression, and enhancing peptide antigen presentation (1). The anti-viral activity of IFN-γ is due to its induction of PKR and other regulatory proteins. Binding of IFN-γ to the IFNGR1/IFNGR2 complex promotes dimerization of the receptor complexes to form the (IFNGR1/IFNGR2)2 -IFN-γ dimer. Binding induces a conformational change in receptor intracellular domains and signaling involves Jak1, Jak2, and Stat1 (3). The critical role of IFN-γ in amplification of immune surveillance and function is supported by increased susceptibility to pathogen infection by IFN-γ or IFNGR knockout mice and in humans with inactivating mutations in IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. IFN-γ also appears to have a role in atherosclerosis (4).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Receptor autophosphorylation follows binding of the IGF-I and IGF-II ligands. Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) play an integral role in modifying insulin-like growth factor (IGF) actions in a wide variety of cell types. This family contains six members that are structurally related but encoded by distinct genes. IGFBPs have a high affinity for IGFs. Some members of the IGFBP family have been consistently shown to inhibit IGF actions by preventing them from gaining access to the IGF receptors, while others potentiate IGF actions by facilitating the ligand-receptor interaction (1-3). IGFBP2 is the second most abundant IGFBP in the circulation and is present in various other biological fluids and tissues of many vertebrate species. Serum IGFBP2 levels are elevated in conditions such as shock, fasting, hypoxemia or after traumata, suggesting complex regulation of IGFBP2 expression (4). IGFBP2 is overexpressed in many malignancies and is often correlated with an increasingly malignant status of the tumor, pointing to a potential involvement of IGFBP2 in tumorigenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling plays a major role in regulating the proliferation and metabolism of normal and malignant cells. Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) play an integral role in modifying IGF actions in a wide variety of cell types. The six IGFBP family members share a high affinity for IGF binding and are structurally related, but are encoded by distinct genes (1). IGF binding proteins can exert stimulatory or inhibitory effects by controlling IGF availability through high affinity binding of IGF at the carboxy-terminal domain (2,3). IGFBP3 is the most abundant serum IGF binding protein and the main mediator for IGF-I bioactivities. IGFBP3 also binds IGF-II, insulin, and other cellular and extracellular components to regulate cell growth, development, and apoptosis through both IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms (4-8). Research studies describe correlations between increased IGF-I levels and reduced levels of IGFBP3 with increased risks of developing cancer, including breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancer (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: IGFBP7 (also known as Mac25, TAF, or IGFBP-rP1) belongs to the IGFBP superfamily, which plays an integral role in regulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) actions in a wide variety of cell types. There are six known high-affinity IGF binding family members (IGFBP1-6), and ten low-affinity IGF binding members. These family members are structurally related, but encoded by distinct genes (1,2). IGFBP7 is a low-affinity IGF binding protein (1). The protein functions through its binding to secreted growth factors including IGF1, insulin, and activin (3,4). IGFBP7 levels have been related to cancer development and tissue injury. Loss of expression of IGFBP7 has been associated with poor survival in multiple cancer types (5,6) and with tumor chemotherapy resistance (7,8). IGFBP7 also has been identified as a cell cycle arrest biomarker for human acute kidney injury (AKI) and serves as a prognostic indicator for early stage AKI development (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Ikaros family of zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins belongs to the Kruppel transcription factor superfamily. Ikaros proteins are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal dimerization domain. Members of the Ikaros family include Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, EOS, and Pegasus (1). All family members can form homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the Ikaros family. Most also contain multiple isoforms that are generated as a result of differential splicing, with some isoforms behaving in a dominant negative manner upon dimerization (2).Ikaros (IKZF1, LYF1) is the prototypical Ikaros family zinc-finger transcription factor and is expressed abundantly in lymphoid cells. Genetic studies in mice demonstrate that Ikaros is a tumor suppressor that is important for the normal development of B, T, natural killer, and dendritic cells (3,4). Additional studies show that imbalanced expression of different Ikaros isoforms, as well as mutations in the corresponding IKAROS gene, can be associated with a number of hematologic malignancies in humans (2,5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state, complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Most agents that activate NF-κB do so through a common pathway based on phosphorylation-induced, proteasome-mediated degradation of IκB (3-7). The key regulatory step in this pathway involves activation of a high molecular weight IκB kinase (IKK) complex whose catalysis is generally carried out by three tightly associated IKK subunits. IKKα and IKKβ serve as the catalytic subunits of the kinase and IKKγ serves as the regulatory subunit (8,9). Activation of IKK depends upon phosphorylation at Ser177 and Ser181 in the activation loop of IKKβ (Ser176 and Ser180 in IKKα), which causes conformational changes, resulting in kinase activation (10-13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Guinea Pig, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state, complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Most agents that activate NF-κB do so through a common pathway based on phosphorylation-induced, proteasome-mediated degradation of IκB (3-7). The key regulatory step in this pathway involves activation of a high molecular weight IκB kinase (IKK) complex whose catalysis is generally carried out by three tightly associated IKK subunits. IKKα and IKKβ serve as the catalytic subunits of the kinase and IKKγ serves as the regulatory subunit (8,9). Activation of IKK depends upon phosphorylation at Ser177 and Ser181 in the activation loop of IKKβ (Ser176 and Ser180 in IKKα), which causes conformational changes, resulting in kinase activation (10-13).