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Product listing: Histone H2A Antibody II, UniProt ID P0C0S8 #2578 to HPC4-Tag Antibody #68083

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Histone H2A.X is a variant histone that represents approximately 10% of the total H2A histone proteins in normal human fibroblasts (1). H2A.X is required for checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest and DNA repair following double-stranded DNA breaks (1). DNA damage, caused by ionizing radiation, UV-light, or radiomimetic agents, results in rapid phosphorylation of H2A.X at Ser139 by PI3K-like kinases, including ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK (2,3). Within minutes following DNA damage, H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 at sites of DNA damage (4). This very early event in the DNA-damage response is required for recruitment of a multitude of DNA-damage response proteins, including MDC1, NBS1, RAD50, MRE11, 53BP1, and BRCA1 (1). In addition to its role in DNA-damage repair, H2A.X is required for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and is phosphorylated by various kinases in response to apoptotic signals. H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 by DNA-PK in response to cell death receptor activation, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK1) in response to UV-A irradiation, and p38 MAPK in response to serum starvation (5-8). H2A.X is constitutively phosphorylated on Tyr142 in undamaged cells by WSTF (Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor) (9,10). Upon DNA damage, and concurrent with phosphorylation of Ser139, Tyr142 is dephosphorylated at sites of DNA damage by recruited EYA1 and EYA3 phosphatases (9). While phosphorylation at Ser139 facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and apoptotic proteins to sites of DNA damage, phosphorylation at Tyr142 appears to determine which set of proteins are recruited. Phosphorylation of H2A.X at Tyr142 inhibits the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and promotes binding of pro-apoptotic factors such as JNK1 (9). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing only mutant H2A.X Y142F, which favors recruitment of DNA repair proteins over apoptotic proteins, show a reduced apoptotic response to ionizing radiation (9). Thus, it appears that the balance of H2A.X Tyr142 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation provides a switch mechanism to determine cell fate after DNA damage.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). There are five major variants of histone H2A: canonical H2A (most abundant), H2A.X, MacroH2A, H2ABbd and H2A.Z (2). Histone H2A.Z, the most conserved variant across species, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of transcription and is important for chromosome stability (2). Several homologous protein complexes, such as SWR-C (S. cerevisiae), TIP60 (D. melanogaster) and SRCAP (mammals), have been shown to catalyze the ATP-dependent exchange of H2A.Z for H2A in the nucleosome (3,4,5). This exchange of histone H2A variants changes histone-histone interactions in the nucleosome core and alters an acidic patch on the surface of the nucleosome, resulting in changes in nucleosome stability and binding of non-histone proteins such as HP1α (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). The p300/CBP histone acetyltransferases acetylate multiple lysine residues in the amino terminal tail of histone H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20) at gene promoters during transcriptional activation (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the access of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites that facilitate recruitment of many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins that contain a bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Histone H2B is mono-ubiquitinated at Lys120 during transcriptional activation by the RAD6 E2 protein in conjunction with the BRE1A/BRE1B E3 ligase (also known as RNF20/RNF40) (7). Mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B Lys120 is associated with the transcribed region of active genes and stimulates transcriptional elongation by facilitating FACT-dependent chromatin remodeling (7-9). In addition, it is essential for subsequent methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and Lys79, two additional histone modifications that regulate transcriptional initiation and elongation (10). In response to metabolic stress, AMPK is recruited to responsive genes and phosphorylates histone H2B at Lys36, both at promoters and in transcribed regions of genes, and may regulate transcriptional elongation (11). In response to multiple apoptotic stimuli, histone H2B is phosphorylated at Ser14 by the Mst1 kinase (12). Upon induction of apoptosis, Mst1 is cleaved and activated by caspase-3, leading to global phosphorylation of histone H2B during chromatin condensation. Interestingly, histone H2B is rapidly phosphorylated at irradiation-induced DNA damage foci in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (13). In this case, phosphorylation at Ser14 is rapid, depends on prior phosphorylation of H2AX Ser139, and occurs in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that Ser14 phosphorylation may have distinct roles in DNA-damage repair and apoptosis.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chondroblastoma is a rare type of benign tumor that is found at the rounded ends of the long bones in the arms and legs. More than 90% of chondroblastomas have been found to contain a heterozygous mutation in the H3F3A gene encoding the histone variant H3.3 (1). This mutation, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution in codon 36 (K36M), inhibits at least two histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases, WHSC1 (MMSET) and SETD2, resulting in the reduction of global levels of histone H3 lysine 36 methylation (1). Chondrocytes containing the histone H3 K36M mutation exhibit several hallmarks of cancer cells, including increased ability to form colonies, resistance to apoptosis, and defects in differentiation. Reduction of global methylation levels in chondrocytes, resulting from the K36M mutation, contributes to tumorigenesis by altering the expression of cancer-associated genes. The histone H3 K36M mutation is also found to promote sarcomagenesis by impairing the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells, resulting in undifferentiated sarcomas (2). The K36M mutation alters the histone methylation landscape, resulting in a genome-wide gain in histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and redistribution of polycomb respressive complex 1 and derepression of its target genes known to block mesenchymal differentiation. Finally, the histone H3 K36M mutation is also found in 13% of HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carinomas, again contributing to tumorigenesis by altering global methylation levels of histone H3 lysine 36 (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Multiple exome sequencing analyses have uncovered a high frequency of histone H3 driver mutations in a number of different cancers, including diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), chondroblastoma, sarcomas, and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Previous studies have shown that lysine to methionine histone mutations in these cancers act as potent inhibitors of their respective lysine methyltransferases, resulting in gross alterations to the histone methylation landscape and deregulation of gene expression. In DIPG for example, the histone H3 K27M mutation is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (1-3). In chondrocytomas, the histone H3 K36M mutation functions to inhibit the WHSC1 (MMSET) and SETD2 histone methyltransferases, resulting in a reduction in the levels of histone H3 lysine 36 tri-methylation and deregulation of a number of cancer-associated genes (4). Similar to the H3K27M and H3K26M mutations, the histone H3 K9M mutation has been shown to inhibit the H3K9-directed histone methyltransferase G9a, resulting in reduced levels of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Given the widespread role of G9a in the regulation of gene expression, it is likely that this K9M mutation also plays a role in cancer.

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HMGA2 belongs to the family of high mobility group with AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA2 is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed and plays a crucial role during embryonic development (3). HMGA2 promotes stem cell self-renewal and research studies have shown that decreased HMGA2 expression is associated with stem cell aging (4-7). Investigators have shown that expression levels of HMGA2 are very low in normal adult tissues, while either overexpression or rearrangement is associated with many types of cancer (8-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A0 (hnRNP A0) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). The A/B subfamily of hnRNP includes A1, A2/B1, A3, and A0. hnRNP A0 is phosphorylated at Ser84 by MAPKAPK-2 in response to LPS treatment in mouse macrophage cells, which might play a key role in stimulating translation of the TNF-α message (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). hnRNP A1 regulates the alternative splicing of c-Src and c-H-Ras (2,3) and modifies initiation of translation of the fibroblast growth factor 2 mRNA (4). hnRNP A1 expression level is elevated in many cancers; knockdown of hnRNP A1 leads to apoptosis in various cancer cells (5). Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 is continually transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it disassociates from mRNA and is rapidly re-imported into the nucleus (6,7). hnRNP A1 binds to cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS) of HIV-1 to influence HIV-1 production (8,9). HIV-1 enhances hnRNP A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism, and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). hnRNP A1 regulates the alternative splicing of c-Src and c-H-Ras (2,3) and modifies initiation of translation of the fibroblast growth factor 2 mRNA (4). hnRNP A1 expression level is elevated in many cancers; knockdown of hnRNP A1 leads to apoptosis in various cancer cells (5). Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 is continually transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it disassociates from mRNA and is rapidly re-imported into the nucleus (6,7). hnRNP A1 binds to cis-acting repressive sequences (CRS) of HIV-1 to influence HIV-1 production (8,9). HIV-1 enhances hnRNP A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: hnRNP E1 is a member of the hnRNP family of proteins that are involved in pre-mRNA processing and mRNA export, localization, stability, and translation (1-6). hnRNP E1 exerts a wide range of biological functions, such as transcriptional activation of mouse MOR gene expression (7), attenuation of alternative splicing of GHR pseudoexon expression (8), stabilization of collagen I and II (9), beta-globin (10), and androgen receptor (11) mRNAs, and regulation of translation of various genes including Dab2, ILEI, and Bag-1 (12,13). hnRNP E1 is ubiquitously expressed. Phosphorylation of hnRNP E1 affects its RNA binding affinity (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) belongs to a family of RNA binding multiprotein complexes (hnRNP proteins) that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and transport of mRNA from the nucleus to cytoplasm (1-3). hnRNP K contains three unique structural motifs termed KH domains that bind poly(C) DNA and RNA sequences (4,5). Intricate architecture enables hnRNP K to facilitate mRNA biosynthesis (6), transcriptional regulation (7), and signal transduction. Research studies have shown that cytoplasmic hnRNP K expression is increased in oral squamous cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer, and may be a potential prognostic factor (8,9). hnRNP K coordinates with p53 to regulate its target gene transcription in response to DNA damage. Proteasome degradation of hnRNP K is mediated by E3 ligase MDM2 (10). The interaction between hnRNP K and c-Src leads to hnRNP K phosphorylation, which allows for hnRNP K activation of silenced mRNA translation (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) belongs to a family of RNA binding multiprotein complexes (hnRNP proteins) that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and transport of mRNA from the nucleus to cytoplasm (1-3). hnRNP K contains three unique structural motifs termed KH domains that bind poly(C) DNA and RNA sequences (4,5). Intricate architecture enables hnRNP K to facilitate mRNA biosynthesis (6), transcriptional regulation (7), and signal transduction. Research studies have shown that cytoplasmic hnRNP K expression is increased in oral squamous cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer, and may be a potential prognostic factor (8,9). hnRNP K coordinates with p53 to regulate its target gene transcription in response to DNA damage. Proteasome degradation of hnRNP K is mediated by E3 ligase MDM2 (10). The interaction between hnRNP K and c-Src leads to hnRNP K phosphorylation, which allows for hnRNP K activation of silenced mRNA translation (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L) belongs to a family of RNA binding multiprotein complexes (hnRNP proteins) that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and transport of mRNA from the nucleus to cytoplasm (1-3). hnRNP L binds to CA repeat elements to regulate splicing and RNA stability (4-6). Binding of hnRNP L has been shown to occur in response to stress stimuli to regulate conformational change and subsequent translation of mRNAs (7). hnRNPL can promote apoptosis by enhancing translation of p53 mRNA (8) . In the context of tumor progression, hnRNPL has been shown to bind and modify translation of critical regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that shares 69% amino acid homology with hnRNP L, a component of the hnRNP complex that regulates mRNA formation, packaging, and processing (1). hnRNP LL is induced in activated T cells and functions as a critical regulator of alternative splicing of CD45, a tyrosine phosphatase crucial for T cell development and activation (2). hnRNP LL also regulates the splicing of CD44 and Stat5a (2). The four isoforms of hnRNP LL are generated by alternative splicing and are widely expressed in human tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein Q and R belong to a family of hnRNP proteins that are involved in RNA binding, RNA biosynthesis, and mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (1-3). These two proteins are encoded by different genes but have 83% homology. hnRNP Q has three alternative splice variants (hnRNP Q1-3) (1-3). Methylation of carboxy-terminal arginine residues is required for nuclear localization (4). hnRNP Q binds to AU-rich mRNA in conjunction with AUF1 and regulates mRNA decay (5). hnRNP Q isoforms play a crucial role in mediating nuclear function of survival of motor neuron (SMN) complex (6,7) and modulating RNA biosynthesis and hepatitis C virus replication (8). hnRNP R was identified recently and its function is still under investigation (9), however hnRNP R does not duplicate the biological function of hnRNP Q. Both hnRNP Q and R are present in cytoplasmic mRNP granules containing untranslated mRNAs (10) and both interact with SMN (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of heme that results in the release of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin (1). The products of this enzymatic reaction play important biological roles in antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective functions (2). Heme oxygenase comprises two isozymes, including the constitutively expressed HO-2 isozyme and the inducible HO-1 isozyme (3). Inducible HO-1 is expressed as an adaptive response to several stimuli, including heme, metals, and hormones (4). The induction of HO-1 has been implicated in numerous disease states, such as transplant rejection, hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, endotoxic shock, diabetes, inflammation, and neurological disorders (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of heme that results in the release of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin (1). The products of this enzymatic reaction play important biological roles in antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective functions (2). Heme oxygenase comprises two isozymes, including the constitutively expressed HO-2 isozyme and the inducible HO-1 isozyme (3). Inducible HO-1 is expressed as an adaptive response to several stimuli, including heme, metals, and hormones (4). The induction of HO-1 has been implicated in numerous disease states, such as transplant rejection, hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, endotoxic shock, diabetes, inflammation, and neurological disorders (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Homer1, Homer2 and Homer3 are scaffolding proteins, composed of an EVH protein–binding domain, a coiled-coil domain and a leucine zipper domain. The EVH domain is a protein-protein binding module that binds to the proline-rich motifs PPXXF, PPXF, and LPSSP of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3Rs), ryanodine receptors, and TRP channels (1-2). The coiled-coil and the leucine zipper domains cause multimerization of Homers and assemble signaling proteins complexes. The Homer1 gene encodes a short isoform (Homer1a, aa 1-186) and two long isoforms (Homer1b, aa 1-354; Homer1c, aa 1-366). Homer1a lacks the coiled-coil domain and leucine zipper, antagonizing multimerization of Homers and thus disassembling signaling proteins complexes (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HOP, also known as stress-induced phospho protein 1 (STIP), is a co-chaperone to the major heat shock proteins, Hsp70 and Hsp90, and appears in early receptor complexes (1,2). Through mutual binding to both Hsp70 and Hsp90, Hop functions as an adaptor that can integrate Hsp70 and Hsp90 interactions (3,4). HOP is an abundant and highly conserved protein which is composed of three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains (TPR1, TPR2a and TPR2b) and two DP repeat domains (DP1 and DP2), whose function has not been fully resolved (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Homeobox protein Hox-D9 (HOXD9) is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is part of a developmental regulatory program that provides cells with specific positional identities on the anterior-posterior axis. HOXD9 is developmentally expressed in structures of either mesodermal or neuro-ectodermal origin, such as developing limbs, gonads, and the central nervous system (1-6). HOXD9 plays a critical role in regulation of limb development, neuronal development, and development of mammary glands and gonads in many organisms (1-6). The HOXD9 gene promoter is found to be hypermethylated and silenced in multiple types of cancer, including breast cancer, melanoma brain metastases, and cholangiocarcinomas (7-9). In addition, HOXD expression is increased in other types of cancer, including human glioblastomas and astrocytomas, where expression appears to drive growth of the tumors (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.