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Product listing: MUC16 Antibody, UniProt ID Q8WXI7 #29623 to NDRG3 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9UGV2 #5846

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mucins are a family of macromolecules that line and protect the respiratory epithelium from microbes and pollutants in the local environment. Of the family members that are known to date, some are produced in a cell type and tissue-specific manner, suggesting distinct biological roles for members. Some members polymerize after secretion to form gel-like substances that coat the epithelial layer (1). MUC16 is a member of the mucin family, which are a high molecular weight, O-glycosylatyed proteins that play an important role in forming mucous barrier (2) and are found on the apical surface of the epithelia. It contains an extracellular domain at its amino acid terminus, a large tandem repeat and a transmembrane domain with a short cytoplasmic domain. MUC16 has been linked to lung cancer (3), and ovarian cancer (4). It provides protective, lubricating barrier against particles and infectious agents at mucosal surfaces (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Musashi-1 and Musashi-2 are RNA-binding proteins which play a role in asymmetric cell division of ectodermal precursor cells by regulating the translation of target mRNA. Both family members augment Notch signaling and repress the translation of m-Numb, a protein that positively modulates differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons. Thus, Musashi contributes to the maintenance of neural stem cells (1). While Musashi-1 is frequently used as a marker for proliferating neural precursor cells, it is also expressed in epithelial stem cells including intestinal and mammary gland stem cells (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidase enzyme that is part of the host defense system of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (reviewed in 1). The gene for MPO was cloned independently from several laboratories (2-5). A decrease in MPO expression was noticed upon differentiation of HL-60 cells (5). MPO catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and chloride (or other halides) to produce hypochlorous acid and other potent antimicrobial oxidants. Knockout mice of MPO are impaired in clearing select microbial infections (6). Processing of mature MPO from an initial 80-90 kDa translation product involves insertion of a heme moiety, glycosylation, and proteolytic cleavage. The mature protein is a tetramer of two heavy chains (60 kDa) and two light chains (12 kDa). It is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and monocytes and secreted during their activation. Heightened MPO levels have been associated with tissue damage and a number of pathological conditions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Base excision repair (BER) proteins catalyze the removal of incorrect or damaged bases, including oxidized bases, from DNA. N-glycosylases specific to a given lesion remove the incorrect base as the first step in BER. MYH is the mammalian ortholog of E. coli MutY, a DNA glycosylase that catalyzes the removal of 8-oxoG:A mismatches (1). Several MYH isoforms have been detected in human cells localizing to either the nucleus or the mitochondria (2). MYH interacts with DNA repair proteins and localizes to DNA damage foci after oxidative damage (3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the corresponding MYH gene are associated with human gastric (4) and colorectal (5-7) cancers.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms depending on its distribution. In smooth muscle, MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). This phosphorylation is correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). ROCK also phosphorylates Ser19 of smooth muscle MLC2, which regulates the assembly of stress fibers (3). Phosphorylation of smooth muscle MLC2 at Ser1/Ser2 and Ser9 by PKC and cdc2 has been reported to inhibit myosin ATPase activity (4,5). Phosphorylation by cdc2 controls the timing of cytokinesis (5). Transgenic mice lacking phosphorylation sites on the cardiac muscle isoform show morphological and functional abnormalities (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Myosin Va is a molecular motor protein involved in the transport of organelles, vesicles and other cellular cargo along actin filaments (reviewed in 1). The molecule consists of two identical heavy chains, which dimerize via helical domains in a coiled coil structure. The amino-terminal motor domains of the heavy chains contain both the ATPase and the actin-binding activities of myosin Va. The globular tail domains act in a regulatory capacity, binding the myosin Va cargo (2) or inhibiting motor activity by binding the head domains and preventing ATP consumption (3). Mutation of the murine dilute gene, which encodes myosin Va, causes defects in coat pigmentation as well as severe neurological defects (4). In melanocytes, the coiled coil structure of myosin Va is important in regulating the trafficking of melanosomes in conjunction with melanophilin and Rab27a (5). Myosin Va regulates trafficking and exocytosis of secretory granules in neuroendocrine cells (reviewed in 6) as well as RNA transport and distribution (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cell functions. Substrate specificity is determined by the binding of a regulatory subunit to the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). It is estimated that over fifty different regulatory subunits exist (1).The myosin phosphatase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: PP1c, a targeting/regulatory subunit (MYPT/myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), and a 20 kDa subunit of unknown function (M20). MYPT binding to PP1cδ alters the conformation of the catalytic cleft and increases enzyme activity and specificity (2). Two MYPT isoforms that are 61% identical have been described. MYPT1 is widely expressed, while MYPT2 expression appears to be exclusive to heart and brain (3). Related family members include MBS85, MYPT3, and TIMAP (4).Myosin phosphatase regulates the interaction of actin and myosin in response to signaling through the small GTPase Rho. Rho activity inhibits myosin phosphatase via Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853 results in phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: MYST3, also known as Monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) and lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2, and TIP60) family of histone acetyltransferases (1,2). First discovered as a fusion partner of CREBBP in acute myeloid leukemia, MYST3 contributes to Hox gene expression and segment identity during development (3-6). MYST3 forms an evolutionarily conserved complex with ING5, EAF6, and BRD1 and has been shown to be a coactivator for many different transcription factors including PU.1, NRF2, and Runx family members (7-9). MYST3 is critical in hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, where it acts synergistically with polycomb member BMI1 (10). Inhibitors of MYST3 are being investigated for therapeutic value as they can induce senescence and decrease tumor growth (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NAC1 or nuclear accumbens-1 is a nuclear factor that belongs to the POZ/BTB (Pox virus and zinc finger/bric-a-brac tramtrack broad complex) domain family. Also known as BTBD14B, it was originally identified in a unique neuronal forebrain structure responsible for reward motivation and addictive behaviors (1,2). NAC1 recruits HDAC3 and HDAC4 to transcriptionally repress gene expression in neuronal cells (3) and specifically co-represses other POZ/BTB proteins in the central nervous system (4). NAC1 is upregulated in several tumor types, including breast, renal cell, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as high grade ovarian serous carcinoma, where it has long been suspected as a chemoresistance gene (5,6). The chemoresistance mechanism reportedly occurs through NAC1 negative regulation of the GADD45 pathway (7). NAC1 has also been described as part of the extended transcriptional network in pluripotent cells that involves Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog, Sall1, KLF4 and Sall4 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NAC1 or nuclear accumbens-1 is a nuclear factor that belongs to the POZ/BTB (Pox virus and zinc finger/bric-a-brac tramtrack broad complex) domain family. Also known as BTBD14B, it was originally identified in a unique neuronal forebrain structure responsible for reward motivation and addictive behaviors (1,2). NAC1 recruits HDAC3 and HDAC4 to transcriptionally repress gene expression in neuronal cells (3) and specifically co-represses other POZ/BTB proteins in the central nervous system (4). NAC1 is upregulated in several tumor types, including breast, renal cell, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as high grade ovarian serous carcinoma, where it has long been suspected as a chemoresistance gene (5,6). The chemoresistance mechanism reportedly occurs through NAC1 negative regulation of the GADD45 pathway (7). NAC1 has also been described as part of the extended transcriptional network in pluripotent cells that involves Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog, Sall1, KLF4 and Sall4 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NADK, also known as NAD kinase, is a cytoplasmic protein responsible for maintaining the pool of available NADP+ and NADPH within the cell (1). Using ATP as a phosphate donor, NADK catalyzes the phosphorylation of NAD+ to NADP+. This molecule is then reduced to NADPH and utilized in various metabolic and biosynthetic pathways (2). NADK has been suggested to play a role in glucose metabolism due to the effect NADPH production has on both the insulin secretion and survival of pancreatic β-cells (3). NADPH has a vital role in protecting cells from oxidative stress through its neutralizing effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS), which also accumulate during cell growth (2, 3, 4). Along with the p53 tumor suppression protein, NADK has been a suggested target in cancer therapy due its link to NADPH production and its resulting protective role on growing and proliferating cells (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Naked1 (Nkd1) and Naked2 (Nkd2) are homologs of Drosophila Naked cuticle, a negative regulator of Wnt/Wingless signaling pathway which functions through a feedback mechanism (1,2). Both Drosophila and vertebrate Naked proteins contain a putative calcium-binding EF-hand motif, however, Drosophila Naked binds to zinc instead of calcium (3). Naked inhibits the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway by binding to Dishevelled proteins and directs Dishevelled activity towards the planar cell polarity pathway (2,4). Naked1 is a direct target of Wnt signaling and is overexpressed in some colon tumors due to constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway (5). Naked2 is myristoylated and is required for sorting of TGF-α to the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NALP1 (DEFCAP/NAC/CARD7) is an NLR (Nod-like receptor) family member that has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and inflammatory responses (1-5). Structurally, NALP contains an amino-terminal PYRIN domain, followed by a nucleotide-binding site (NBS), a leucine rich repeat region (LRR), and a carboxy-terminal CARD domain. NALP1 and interacts strongly with caspase-2 and weakly with caspase-9, and induces apoptosis when overexpressed (3). Similar to a related Ced-4 family member Apaf-1, it was also shown to be involved in cytochrome c-dependent caspase activation (2). It has also been shown to be part of the "inflammasome" comprised of caspase-1, caspase-5, and Pycard/ASC, which is critical in the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β (6). Two major isoforms were identified for NALP1, which differ in a 44 amino acid region within the LRR (3). In addition, like NALP3, a short NALP1 isoform lacking the LRR (NALP1s) likely exists (7). Polymorphisms in NALP1 have been associated with autoimmune disease (8) and susceptibility to toxins (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nanog is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that is essential for the maintenance of pluripotency and self renewal in embryonic stem cells (1). Nanog expression is controlled by a network of factors including Sox2 and the key pluripotency regulator Oct-4 (1). Recent advances in somatic cell reprogramming have utilized viral expression of combinations of transcription factors including nanog, Oct-4, Sox2, KLF4, c-Myc, and LIN28 (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NBC1/SLC4A4 is an eletrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter. It mediates the coupled movement of Na+ and HCO3- ions across the basolateral membrane of cells. NBC1 regulates secretion and absorption of bicarbonate and modulates intracellular pH (1-3). There are five isoforms of NBC1 produced by alternative splicing including the most studied isoforms, 1 and 2, which have different N termini. The N terminus of isoform 1 contains multiple consensus phosphorylation sites for various kinases, such as PKA, PKC, and CK II, and may play a regulatory role in the biological function of NBC1 (4). Interaction with carbonic anhydrase II, IV, and IX regulates the transporter acitivity of NBC1 (5-7). NBC1 is expressed in various tissues with the exception of isoform 2, which is mainly expressed in kidney proximal tubules (1). Isoform 1 is expressed in the pancreas and corneal endothelium, and at low levels in other tissues including heart, skeletal muscle, liver, and prostate (4). Research studies have shown that mutations in the NBC1 gene are linked to proximal renal tubular acidosis with ocular abnormalities (also known as renal tubular acidosis II).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule, CD56) is an adhesion glycoprotein with five extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III repeats. Structural diversity is introduced by alternative splicing resulting in different cytoplasmic domains (1). NCAM mediates neuronal attachment, neurite extension and cell-cell interactions through homo and heterophilic interactions. PSA (polysialic acid) post-translationally modifies NCAM and increases the metastatic potential of small cell lung carcinoma, Wilms+ tumor, neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma (2). CD56 and CD16 are commonly used to identify NK cells although some cells with the T cell markers CD3 and CD4 also express CD56 (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The most well characterized nuclear receptor corepressors are SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors) and its close paralog NCoR1 (nuclear receptor corepressor) (1,2). NCoR1 functions to transcriptionally silence various unliganded, DNA bound non-steroidal nuclear receptors by serving as a large molecular scaffold that bridges the receptors with multiple chromatin remodeling factors that repress nuclear receptor-mediated gene transcription, in part, through deacetylation of core histones surrounding target promoters. Indeed, the N-terminal portion of NCoR1 possesses multiple distinct transcriptional repression domains (RDs) reponsible for the recruitment of additional components of the corepressor complex such as HDACs, mSin3, GPS2, and TBL1/TBLR1. In between the RDs lies a pair of potent repressor motifs known as SANT motifs (SWI3, ADA2, N-CoR, and TFIIIB), which recruit HDAC3 and histones to the repressor complex in order to enhance HDAC3 activity (3). The C-terminal portion of NCoR1 contains multiple nuclear receptor interaction domains (NDs), each of which contains a conserved CoRNR box (or L/I-X-X-I/V-I) motif that allow for binding to various unliganded nuclear hormone receptors such as thyroid hormone (THR) and retinoic acid (RAR) receptors (4,5).Recent genetic studies in mice have not only corroborated the wealth of biochemical studies involving NCoR1 but have also provided significant insight regarding the function of NCoR1 in mammalian development and physiology. Although it has been observed that loss of Ncor1 does not affect early embyonic development, likely due to compensation by Smrt, embryonic lethality ultimately results during mid-gestation, largely due to defects in erythropoesis and thymopoesis (6). Another study demonstrated that the NDs of NCoR1 are critical for its ability to function in a physiological setting as a transcriptional repressor of hepatic THR and Liver X Receptor (LXR) (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also termed Cap43, Drg1, RTP/rit42, and Proxy-1, is a member of the NDRG family, which is composed of four members (NDRG1-4) that function in growth, differentiation, and cell survival (1-5). NDRG1 is ubiquitously expressed and highly responsive to a variety of stress signals including DNA damage (4), hypoxia (5), and elevated levels of nickel and calcium (2). Expression of NDRG1 is elevated in N-myc defective mice and is negatively regulated by N- and c-myc (1,6). During DNA damage, NDRG1 is induced in a p53-dependent fashion and is necessary for p53-mediated apoptosis (4,7). Research studies have shown that NDRG1 may also play a role in cancer progression by promoting differentiation, inhibiting growth, and modulating metastasis and angiogenesis (3,4,6,8,9). Nonsense mutation of the NDRG1 gene has been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (HMSNL), which is supported by studies demonstrating the role of NDRG1 in maintaining myelin sheaths and axonal survival (10,11). NDRG1 is up-regulated during mast cell maturation and its deletion leads to attenuated allergic responses (12). Both NDRG1 and NDRG2 are substrates of SGK1, although the precise physiological role of SGK1-mediated phosphorylation is not known (13). NDRG1 is phosphorylated by SGK1 at Thr328, Ser330, Thr346, Thr356, and Thr366. Phosphorylation by SGK1 primes NDRG1 for phosphorylation by GSK-3.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NDRG (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene) family consisting of NDRG1, NDRG2, NDRG3, and NDRG4 are structurally related proteins with roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, stress responses, and cell migration/metastasis (1-3). NDRG1 was originally identified as a protein that was upregulated in N-Myc knockout mice (1). Proteins in the NDRG family, particularly NDRG1 and NDRG2, have been reported to be down-regulated in various cancer tissues and have been suggested to function as a tumor suppressors (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NDRG (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene) family consisting of NDRG1, NDRG2, NDRG3, and NDRG4 are structurally related proteins with roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, stress responses, and cell migration/metastasis (1-3). NDRG1 was originally identified as a protein that was upregulated in N-Myc knockout mice (1). Proteins in the NDRG family, particularly NDRG1 and NDRG2, have been reported to be down-regulated in various cancer tissues and have been suggested to function as a tumor suppressors (4,5).