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Product listing: PRK2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q16513 #2612 to Pumilio 2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q8TB72 #12323

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein kinase C-related kinases (PRKs) are a subfamily of Ser/Thr-specific kinases with a catalytic domain highly homologous to the PKC family (1-3). They are effectors of Rho family GTPases (4-6) and are activated by fatty acids and phospholipids in vitro (7,8). Activation in vitro and in vivo involves the activation loop phosphorylation of PRK1 (Thr774)/PRK2 (Thr816) by PDK1 (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce an asymmetric di-methyl arginine while Type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination catalyzed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most PRMTs, including PRMT1, methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT1 methylates Arg3 of histone H4 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4-6). In addition, PRMT1 methylates many non-histone proteins, including the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4 (6), components of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particle (7), the RNA binding protein Sam68 (8), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3 (ILF3) (9) and interferon-α and β receptors (10). These interactions suggest additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and signal transduction. Alternative mRNA splicing produces three enzymatically active PRMT1 isoforms that differ in their amino-terminal regions (11). PRMT1 is localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, depending on cell type (12,13), and appears in many distinct protein complexes. ILF3, TIS21 and the leukemia-associated BTG1 proteins bind PRMT1 to regulate its methyltransferase activity (9,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce an asymmetric di-methyl arginine while Type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination catalyzed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most PRMTs, including PRMT1, methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT1 methylates Arg3 of histone H4 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4-6). In addition, PRMT1 methylates many non-histone proteins, including the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4 (6), components of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particle (7), the RNA binding protein Sam68 (8), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3 (ILF3) (9) and interferon-α and β receptors (10). These interactions suggest additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and signal transduction. Alternative mRNA splicing produces three enzymatically active PRMT1 isoforms that differ in their amino-terminal regions (11). PRMT1 is localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, depending on cell type (12,13), and appears in many distinct protein complexes. ILF3, TIS21 and the leukemia-associated BTG1 proteins bind PRMT1 to regulate its methyltransferase activity (9,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 4 (PRMT4), also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins, which catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). There are two types of PRMT proteins. While both types catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4 and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce asymmetric di-methyl arginine and type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination performed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most of the PRMTs methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) domains of proteins, such as RGG, RG and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 instead methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT4 methylates Arg2, 17 and 26 of histone H3 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP and p160 coactivators to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4). In addition, PRMT4 methylates many non-histone proteins, including transcriptional coactivators (p300/CBP, SRC-3) (5,6,7,8), splicing factors (SmB, CA150, SAP49, UIC) (3), RNA binding proteins (PABP1, Sam68, HuD, HuR) (9,10,11), and thymocyte cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein (TARPP) (12), suggesting additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and thymocyte maturation. Methylation of the splicing factor CA150 by PRMT4 facilitates an interaction with the Tudor domain of SMN, suggesting a role for PRMT4 in spinal muscular atrophy (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human Skb1Hs methyltransferase (also called JBP1), a homologue of yeast protein Skb1 and Hsl7p (1,2), is composed of 637 amino acid residues and contains motifs conserved among protein methyltransferases. It methylates histones and MBP in vitro (2). Yeast Hsl7p is involved in regulation of cell cycle progression through G2 by negatively regulating Swe1p, a protein tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates and inhibits Cdc28p (3). An Hsl7p homologue, Skb1, was identified in fission yeast by virtue of its yeast two-hybrid interaction with Shk1p, a p21 (cdc42p/Rac) activated kinase (PAK) (4). Both proteins belong to the protein methyltransferase superfamily (5). Interestingly, human Skb1Hs methyltransferase was shown to interact with Jak kinases. This suggests the possibility that the Skb1Hs methyltransferase could link Jak to a PAK signaling pathway in mammalian cells.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, sharing the same receptor, EGFR, and regulating cell proliferation, survival, and differention (1). Members of the family share an EGF-like domain of 45-60 amino acids characterized by the conservation of six regularly spaced cysteins, forming three disulfide bonds that function as their receptor binding domain. TGF-alpha was initially discovered in the media of retrovirally transformed fibroblasts, and it name comes from its ability to induce transformation in cultured fibroblasts (2). This transforming activity was later shown to require TGF-beta, which potentiates the activity of TGF-alpha through a separate receptor (3). Soluble TGF-alpha is released from its membrane-bound precusor, pro-TGF-alpha, following protolytic cleavage, but the membrane bound precursor is still able to bind and activate EGFR (4). Binding of soluble or membrane bound TGF-alpha to EGFR leads to receptor dimerization, tyrosine autophosphorylation, and activation of downstream signaling components. TGF-alpha and related peptides play an important role in the progression of cancer as well as in neuropathological processes (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The dynamic polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments, a process governed by external and internal signaling events, is vital for cell motility (immune cell function, migration, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis), cell division and adhesion. Among the many regulators of actin dynamics are profilins. Profilins are conserved actin binding proteins that affect the rate of actin polymerization by binding actin monomers and promoting the exchange of ADP for ATP (reviewed in 1). Profilins bind to proteins involved in the regulation of actin dynamics including palladin (2), dynamin-1 (3), VASP (4) and N-WASP (5). In mice, knockout of the ubiquitously expressed profilin-1 indicates that the protein is essential for embryonic development (6). Profilin-2 is primarily expressed in brain and functions in the regulation of neurite outgrowth (7), membrane trafficking and endocytosis (3). The recently cloned profilin-3 is expressed in kidney and testes (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PSMD10/Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat chaperone protein that is involved in the assembly of the 19S regulatory particle of the proteasome (1). Reasearch studies have demonstrated that PSMD10 is oncogenic and is overexpressed in hepatocullar carcinomas (2). Investigators believe the oncogenicity of PSMD10 may be linked to its ability to bind and regulate the stability and activity of pRB, CDK4, MDM2, and RelA (2-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Patched1 and 2 (PTCH1 and PTCH2) are twelve-pass transmembrane proteins that function as the receiving receptors for members of the Hedgehog family of proteins (1-4). In the absence of Hedgehog proteins, PTCH suppresses the otherwise constitutively active signaling receptor Smoothened (Smo) so that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is in the off state (5,6). Deactivating mutations that impair the ability of PTCH1 to suppress Smo are frequently found in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (7,8). PTCH proteins have a sterol-sensing domain (SSD) also found in several proteins that function in cholesterol homeostasis, such as HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase) and SCAP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-cleavage activating protein). However, the role of the SSD in Patched proteins is not clear (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Patched1 and 2 (PTCH1 and PTCH2) are twelve-pass transmembrane proteins that function as the receiving receptors for members of the Hedgehog family of proteins (1-4). In the absence of Hedgehog proteins, PTCH suppresses the otherwise constitutively active signaling receptor Smoothened (Smo) so that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is in the off state (5,6). Deactivating mutations that impair the ability of PTCH1 to suppress Smo are frequently found in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (7,8). PTCH proteins have a sterol-sensing domain (SSD) also found in several proteins that function in cholesterol homeostasis, such as HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase) and SCAP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-cleavage activating protein). However, the role of the SSD in Patched proteins is not clear (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is the original member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of proteins (1). PTP1B is highly expressed in insulin-responsive tissues and negatively regulates insulin, as well as integrin, through dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine residues (2-4). PTP1B knockout mice show resistance to dietary weight gain and enhanced insulin sensitivity, suggesting a possible role in treatment of obesity as well as type 2 diabetes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL) family is a distinct group of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), containing a signature phosphatase domain but otherwise lacking homology to known PTP proteins. There are currently three known members of the PRL family (PRL1-3). PRL-1 was the first family member to be identified; it was initially characterized as an immediate early gene (IEG) in regenerating liver and mitogen-treated fibroblasts (1). PRL-3, known widely as PTP4A3, is now the most well-characterized member of the PRL family, due to its important role in regulating cell proliferation, and possibly cancer metastasis. While specific substrates of the PRL-family proteins have remained largely undefined, a recent study in colon cancer cell lines reported that PTP4A3 dephosphorylated integrin β1 at Tyr783 (2). PTP4A3 was also shown to play a potential role in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation of the docking protein p130 (3). Increased rates of both cell proliferation and motility have been observed in immortalized cell lines and murine lung tumor cells over-expressing PTP4A3 (3,4), and elevated levels of PTP4A3 protein are associated with a subset of human cancers (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). Active protein phosphatase 2A is composed of both structural (A) and catalytic (C) proteins, and its activity relies on interaction with regulatory (B) subunits. An important PP2A regulatory subunit is PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as the PP2A activator regulatory subunit 4 (PPP2R4) (4). This PTPA regulatory protein binds ATP and has isomerase (PPIase) activity, suggesting that PP2A regulation involves a change in phosphatase conformation. The addition of ATP (and Mg2+) results in a correlated increase in both PP2A activation and PTPA isomerase activity (5). While the exact mechanism is still under consideration, evidence suggests that binding of PTPA to the PP2A A-C dimer produces a conformational change in PP2A that shifts phosphatase substrate specificity from phosphoserine to phosphotyrosine substrates (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pumilio 1 and Pumilio 2 (PUM1, PUM2, or Pumilio homolog 1 and 2, respectively) are evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins that are thought to repress translation and stability of mRNA targets by binding to the 3'-UTR of specific RNA sequences (1). Pumilio proteins have been implicated in the regulation of genes involved in embryogenesis and germline cell development (2). Research studies have shown that PUM2 may have a role in neural stem cell fate decisions (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pumilio 1 and Pumilio 2 (PUM1, PUM2, or Pumilio homolog 1 and 2, respectively) are evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins that are thought to repress translation and stability of mRNA targets by binding to the 3'-UTR of specific RNA sequences (1). Pumilio proteins have been implicated in the regulation of genes involved in embryogenesis and germline cell development (2). Research studies have shown that PUM2 may have a role in neural stem cell fate decisions (3).