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Product listing: Thioredoxin 1 Antibody (Human Specific), UniProt ID P10599 #2285 to TPX2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9ULW0 #8559

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) to deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) is an essential step in the formation of thymine nucleotides (1,2, reviewed in 3). This process is catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TS or TYMS), a homodimer composed of two 30 kDa subunits. TS is an intracellular enzyme that provides the sole de novo source of thymidylate, making it a required enzyme in DNA biosynthesis with activity highest in proliferating cells (1). Being the exclusive source of dTMP, investigators have concluded that TS is also an important target for anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (1-5). 5-FU acts as a TS inhibitor and is active against solid tumors such as colon, breast, head, and neck. Research studies have demonstrated that patients with metastases expressing lower levels of TS have a higher response rate to treatment with 5-FU than patients with tumors that have increased levels of TS (5). Researchers continue to investigate TS expression in different types of cancers (6-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIAM1 (T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1) is a multidomain guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) protein that activates Rac1, a GTPase involved in cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate cell migration, growth and survival. TIAM1 also has been identified as an inhibitor of the YAP/TAZ signaling pathway, with two distinct subcellular mechanisms of action: (1) promoting cytoplasmic (proteosomal) degradation of YAP and TAZ; and (2) blocking the transcriptional co-activator functions of YAP and TAZ in the nucleus (3,4). The effects of TIAM1 on tumor development are also complex and context-dependent. For example, it has been reported that TIAM1 can promote tumor growth and progression in some contexts, while antagonizing tumor metastasis and invasion in other contexts (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIF1β is a member of the TIF1 (transcriptional intermediary factor 1) family, a group of transcriptional regulators that play key roles in development and differentiation. Members of this family are characterized by the presence of two conserved motifs – an N-terminal RING-B box-coiled-coil motif and a C-terminal PHD finger and bromodomain unit (1,2). TIF1β is a corepressor for KRAB (Kruppel associated box) domain containing zinc finger proteins. The KRAB domain containing zinc finger proteins are a large group of transcription factors that are vertebrate-specific, varied in their expression patterns between species, and thought to regulate gene transcription programs that control speciation (3,4).TIF1β has been shown to be essential for early embryonic development and spermatogenesis (6,5). It functions to either activate or repress transcription in response to environmental or developmental signals by chromatin remodeling and histone modification. The recruitment and association of TIF1β with heterochromatin protein (HP1) is essential for transcriptional repression, and for progression through differentiation of F9 embryonic carcinoma cells (6,7). TIF1β also plays a role in the DNA damage response. Phosphorylation of TIF1β on Ser842 occurs in an ATM-dependent manner in response to genotoxic stress and is thought to be essential for chromatin relaxation, which is in turn required for the DNA damage response (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tip60 is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases and plays a role in a variety of cellular processes such as transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and apoptosis (1,2). Tip60 exists as part of a multi-subunit complex that includes proteins such as TRRAP, p400, Reptin, and Pontin (3,4). Tip60 plays important roles in double-stranded DNA break (DSB) repair. Tip60 is required for the activation of the ATM kinase in response to DSBs, as well as acetylation of histones H4 and H2A.X at DSBs to facilitate DNA repair (1,2,5-7). In addition, Tip60 dependent acetylation at Lys120 of p53 within the DNA binding domain is required for the induction of apoptosis upon DNA damage (8,9). Tip60 is involved in a number of transcriptional regulation pathways driven by factors such as nuclear receptors and β-catenin (10-13). The Tip60 complex has been shown to be important for mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal by regulating transcription of developmental regulators that are controlled by Nanog (14). GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) mediated phosphorylation at Ser86 of Tip60 promotes Tip60 acetylation and subsequent stimulation of the required autophagy protein ULK1 (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tissue Factor (TF)/CD142 (Coagulation factor III/Thromboplastin) is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein that serves as the cell surface receptor and cofactor for blood coagulation factors VII and VIIa, and thus plays a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis (1). The TF:VIIa receptor-ligand complex is widely recognized as the initiator of the extrinsic blood coagulation protease cascade, which ultimately leads to the generation of fibrin and thrombin (1). A member of the type-II cytokine receptor superfamily, TF has also been shown to engage the PI3K (2) and MAPK (3) signaling cascades upon binding to factor VIIa in order to drive cellular responses such as cell migration, growth, and proliferation. Although the function of TF under physiologic conditions is to coordinate blood clotting in response to tissue damage, TF is implicated in pathologic conditions such as tumorigenesis. Indeed, TF is aberrantly expressed in colorectal cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and glioblastoma multiforme (4). It has been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, and venous thrombosis (5). Given that TF overexpression is associated with numerous types of solid tumors, it has garnered much attention as a potential therapeutic target.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TKS5 (SH3PXD2A, FISH) is a scaffold protein expressed on invadosomes of both normal and transformed cell lines. Research studies suggest that TKS5 is functionally required for both the formation and invasive behavior of invadosomes (1, 2). TKS5 has an N-terminal PX domain that mediates invadosome initiation and localization of MMP-rich vesicles to the invadosome (3). TKS5 also has five SH3 domains, which recruit ADAM family proteinases to the invadosome to degrade extracellular matrix. These SH3 domains interact with adaptor proteins to facilitate F-actin polymerization during invadosome formation (4-6). Src tyrosine kinase has been shown to phosphorylate TKS5 at Tyr557 and Tyr619, which was shown to be necessary and sufficient for TKS5-mediated invadopia formation and invasion (7). Elevated TKS5 expression is positively associated with invasive behavior of cancer cells, suggesting TKS5 may have prognostic potential in cancer (8, 9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transducin-like enhancer of split proteins (TLE1, TLE2, TLE3, TLE4, and TLE6) are mammalian homologs of Drosophila Groucho (1). TLEs contain several WD-repeats implicated in protein-protein interaction (2,3). TLEs are transcriptional co-repressors that bind to many transcription factors such as LEF1, Runx1, Oct-1, hepatocyte nuclear factor 3-β as well as histone H3 (4-7). TLEs are differentially expressed during animal development and may have overlapping as well as distinct functions (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tousled-like kinases (TLK1 and TLK2) are nuclear serine/threonine kinases named for their homology to the Tousled gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, essential for flower development (1). The kinase activities of the TLKs are cell cycle regulated, with maximal activity during S phase (1). TLK appears to play a role in chromatin assembly and DNA damage checkpoint regulation (1,2). In C. elegans, TLK1 is essential for appropriate transcription during embryonic development (3). Substrates for TLK include the human chromatin assembly factor Asf, which functions in DNA replication- and repair-coupled chromatin assembly (2). DNA damage during S phase, when TLK is maximally active, leads to inhibition of TLK activity (1). This inhibition requires ataxia mutated kinase (ATM) and Chk1 (4,5). ATM and the related kinase ATR are activited by DNA damage during S phase, phosphorylate Chk1/Chk2, and block the transition into mitosis (6). Chk1 phosphorylates TLK1 on Ser743 in vitro and in vivo, leading to inhibition of TLK1 activity (4). This process likely provides a mechanism to slow the chromatin assembly processes controlled by TLK in the event of DNA damage.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomodulin-1 (TMOD1) belongs to a conserved family of cytoskeletal proteins (TMOD1-4) that play an important role in modulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics. TMOD proteins function as actin capping proteins, which stabilize actin filaments by inhibiting both elongation and depolymerization (1). While many proteins have been identified that cap the rapidly growing barbed end of actin filaments, TMODs are the only proteins thus far identified that cap the slowly growing pointed end (2). A research study in triple-negative breast cancer cells identified TMOD1 as a target of NF-κB signaling, and showed that increased TMOD1 expression was associated with enhanced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model (3). Molecular expression of TMOD1 was also identified as part of a unique gene expression signature that could discriminate ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma from other malignancy subtypes (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TMP21, a type I transmembrane protein, is a member of the p24 cargo protein family, which is highly enriched in the ER, the Golgi and coat protein (COP) I and II transport vesicles (1,2). TMP21 is involved in protein transport and vesicular targeting. In particular, TMP21 influences APP trafficking by stabilizing nascent APP. The absence of TMP21 leads to enhanced maturation and cell surface accumulation of APP (3). In addition, TMP21 is a non-essential component of the γ-secretase complex with the potential to modulate γ-secretase mediated cleavage and Aβ production without having an effect on ε-secretase activity (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α is an important cytokine produced by numerous cell types including neutrophils, activated lymphoctyes, macrophages and NK cells. It plays a critical role in inflammatory responses and in apoptosis (1). TNF-α exists as a membrane-anchored and soluble form, both of which show biological activity. Response to TNF-α is mediated through two receptors, TNF-R1, which is widely expressed, and TNF-R2, which is expressed mainly in immune and endothelial cells (2). Antagonists to TNF-α have been validated as therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: B cell maturation antigen (BCMA/TNFRSF17/CD269) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and member of the TNFR superfamily (1). BCMA expression is largely restricted to the B-cell lineage. Pro-survival signaling through this receptor plays a pivotal role in humoral immunity by regulating B-cell maturation and plasma cell differentiation upon binding its ligands, BAFF and APRIL (2-6). BCMA is expressed in a number B-cell malignancies and has garnered much attention as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of multiple myeloma due to its selective and elevated expression on the cell surface of malignant plasma cells (7-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TNFRSF8/CD30 is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein that is a member of the TNFR superfamily. CD30 is synthesized as a precursor protein that undergoes extensive posttranslational modification before becoming embedded in the plasma membrane as a 120-kDa transmembrane protein (1,2). The expression of CD30 is upregulated in activated T-cells and may trigger costimulatory signaling pathways upon its engagement (3,4). While its expression is normally restricted to subsets of activated T-cells and B-cells, CD30 expression is robustly upregulated in hematologic malignancies, such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and adult T-cell leukemia, thus making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention (5,6). Research studies have suggested that in certain disease contexts, CD30 recruits TRAF2 and TRAF5 adaptor proteins to drive NF-kappa B activation, aberrant cell growth, and cytokine production (7-9). CD30 signaling is also regulated by TACE-dependent proteolytic cleavage of its ectodomain, which results in reduced CD30L-dependent activation of CD30+ cells (10, 11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNIK (Traf2 and Nck-Interacting Kinase) is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK) family (1). TNIK phosphorylates TCF4 and is an essential activator for Wnt signaling (2). Animal knockout model and kinase inhibition studies have reported that TNIK can stimulate both cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (3-5). TNIK has also been shown to promote F-actin disruption through its interactions with Rap2 (6). In neuronal cells, TNIK is enriched in the postsynaptic density (PSD), where it is reported to modulate neuronal receptor surface expression, dendrite complexity and signaling (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA topoisomerases I and II are nuclear enzymes; type II consists of two highly homologous isoforms: topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. These enzymes regulate the topology of DNA, maintain genomic integrity, and are essential for processes such as DNA replication, recombination, transcription, and chromosome segregation by allowing DNA strands to pass through each other (1). Topoisomerase I nicks and rejoins one strand of the duplex DNA, while topoisomerase II transiently breaks and closes double-stranded DNA (2). Topoisomerases are very susceptible to various stresses. Acidic pH or oxidative stress can convert topoisomerases to DNA-breaking nucleases, causing genomic instability and cell death. DNA-damaging topoisomerase targeting drugs (e.g., etoposide) also convert topoisomerases to nucleases, with the enzyme usually trapped as an intermediate that is covalently bound to the 5+ end of the cleaved DNA strand(s). Research studies have shown that this intermediate leads to genomic instability and cell death. Thus, agents that target topoisomerases are highly sought after cancer chemotherapeutic drugs (3). Ca2+-regulated phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at Ser1106 modulates the activity of this enzyme and its sensitivity to targeting drugs (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones and cellular energy status. Elevations of blood glucose during feeding stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway. Feeding also stimulates release of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which further induces insulin release, inhibits glucagon release and promotes β-cell viability. CREB-dependent transcription likely plays a role in both glucose sensing and GLP-1 signaling (1). The protein CRTC2 (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2)/TORC2 (transducer of regulated CREB activity 2) functions as a CREB co-activator (2,3) and is implicated in mediating the effects of these two pathways (4). In quiescent cells, CRTC2/TORC2 is phosphorylated at Ser171 and becomes sequestered in the cytoplasm via an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Glucose and gut hormones lead to the dephosphorylation of CRTC2/TORC2 and its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins. Dephosphorylated CRTC2/TORC2 enters the nucleus to promote CREB-dependent transcription. CRTC2/TORC2 plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription in response to hormonal and energy signals during fasting (5).CRTC2/TORC2-related proteins CRTC1/TORC1 and CRTC3/TORC3 also act as CREB co-activators (2,3). CRTC1/TORC1, CRTC2/TORC2 and CRTC3/TORC3 associate with the HTLV Tax protein to promote Tax-dependent transcription of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (6,7). CRTC1/TORC1 is highly phosphorylated at Ser151 in mouse hypothalamic cells under basal conditions (8). When these cells are exposed to cAMP or a calcium activator, CRTC1/TORC1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus (8). CRTC1/TORC1 is essential for energy balance and fertility (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones and cellular energy status. Elevations of blood glucose during feeding stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway. Feeding also stimulates release of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which further induces insulin release, inhibits glucagon release and promotes β-cell viability. CREB-dependent transcription likely plays a role in both glucose sensing and GLP-1 signaling (1). The protein CRTC2 (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2)/TORC2 (transducer of regulated CREB activity 2) functions as a CREB co-activator (2,3) and is implicated in mediating the effects of these two pathways (4). In quiescent cells, CRTC2/TORC2 is phosphorylated at Ser171 and becomes sequestered in the cytoplasm via an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Glucose and gut hormones lead to the dephosphorylation of CRTC2/TORC2 and its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins. Dephosphorylated CRTC2/TORC2 enters the nucleus to promote CREB-dependent transcription. CRTC2/TORC2 plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription in response to hormonal and energy signals during fasting (5).CRTC2/TORC2-related proteins CRTC1/TORC1 and CRTC3/TORC3 also act as CREB co-activators (2,3). CRTC1/TORC1, CRTC2/TORC2 and CRTC3/TORC3 associate with the HTLV Tax protein to promote Tax-dependent transcription of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (6,7). CRTC1/TORC1 is highly phosphorylated at Ser151 in mouse hypothalamic cells under basal conditions (8). When these cells are exposed to cAMP or a calcium activator, CRTC1/TORC1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus (8). CRTC1/TORC1 is essential for energy balance and fertility (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones and cellular energy status. Elevations of blood glucose during feeding stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway. Feeding also stimulates release of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which further induces insulin release, inhibits glucagon release and promotes β-cell viability. CREB-dependent transcription likely plays a role in both glucose sensing and GLP-1 signaling (1). The protein CRTC2 (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2)/TORC2 (transducer of regulated CREB activity 2) functions as a CREB co-activator (2,3) and is implicated in mediating the effects of these two pathways (4). In quiescent cells, CRTC2/TORC2 is phosphorylated at Ser171 and becomes sequestered in the cytoplasm via an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Glucose and gut hormones lead to the dephosphorylation of CRTC2/TORC2 and its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins. Dephosphorylated CRTC2/TORC2 enters the nucleus to promote CREB-dependent transcription. CRTC2/TORC2 plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription in response to hormonal and energy signals during fasting (5).CRTC2/TORC2-related proteins CRTC1/TORC1 and CRTC3/TORC3 also act as CREB co-activators (2,3). CRTC1/TORC1, CRTC2/TORC2 and CRTC3/TORC3 associate with the HTLV Tax protein to promote Tax-dependent transcription of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (6,7). CRTC1/TORC1 is highly phosphorylated at Ser151 in mouse hypothalamic cells under basal conditions (8). When these cells are exposed to cAMP or a calcium activator, CRTC1/TORC1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus (8). CRTC1/TORC1 is essential for energy balance and fertility (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is a platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) that catalyzes the formation of thymine and 2-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate from thymidine and orthophosphate (1). This intracellular enzyme is capable of both promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis. Thymidine phosphorylase catalytic activity is required for its angiogenic function (2,3). Increased expression of TP/PD-ECGF is seen in a wide variety of different solid tumors and inflammatory diseases and is often associated with poor prognosis (4,5). Alternatively, TP can activate fluorouracil derivative (DFUR) prodrugs and increase the antitumor activity of the related treatment (1,5). The use of thymidine phosphorylase as a cancer therapeutic target has been studied extensively, with emphasis on either inhibiting TP enzymatic activity or increasing enzyme induction with concomitant DFUR treatment (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tripeptidyl-peptidase 2 (TPP2) is a well-conserved subtilisin-like amino peptidase that is expressed predominantly in the cytoplasmic compartment (1,2). The amino-terminal region of TPP2 harbors a catalytic triad that is characteristic of serine proteases and allows for TPP2 cleavage of tripeptides from the free amino terminus of oligopeptide substrates (3). TPP2 is a large (>5MDa) homooligomeric protease in which proteolytic activity is regulated by subunit oligomerization (4,5). While TPP2 plays a general role in amino acid homeostasis, research studies demonstrate that TPP2 is involved in MHC class I antigen presentation (6,7) and DNA-damage repair (8). TPP2 activity is required for the survival of Burkitt's lymphoma cells, suggesting a possible role for TPP2 in oncogenesis (9). Additional research studies show that TPP2 proteolytic activity is important for regulating lysosome abundance and glycolytic metabolism and that TPP2 deficiency leads to defects in adaptive immunity, innate immunity, and nervous system development (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). TPX2, a target of active Ran (RanGTP), is a microtubule nucleating protein. TPX2 is inactive when bound to nuclear importin-alpha. RanGTP activity disrupts this interaction, relieving inhibition of TPX2 (3). TPX2 binding activates Aurora A kinase and promotes its localization to the mitotic spindle (4,5). DNA damage in mitosis leads to loss of interaction between Aurora A and TPX2 and inactivation of Aurora A kinase (6). TPX2 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and knockdown of TPX2 expression in these cells is associated with increased sensitivity to paclitaxel (7).