Interested in promotions? | Click here >>

Product listing: Vav1 Antibody, UniProt ID P15498 #2502 to WNK4 Antibody, UniProt ID Q96J92 #5713

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes, respectively (1,2). Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are categorized into five subfamilies based on catalytic domain structure: USP, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. The valosin-containing protein p97/p47 complex-interacting protein 1 (VCIP135, VCPIP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that belongs to the A20-like subfamily of ovarian tumor (OTU) DUBs (3). VCIP135 serves as a cofactor for the p97/p47 complex in regulating Golgi membrane fusion and reassembly at the end of mitosis (4-6). Research studies suggest that the phosphorylation status of VCIP135 provides a mechanism to fine-tune the kinetics of Golgi disassembly and reassembly during the cell cycle. For example, these studies demonstrate that VCIP135 undergoes phosphorylation early in mitosis, which blocks its association with the Golgi membrane and p97/VCP, thus inhibiting p97/VCP-mediated Golgi membrane fusion (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved and abundant 97 kDa protein that belongs to the AAA (ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. VCP assembles as a homo-hexamer, forming a ring with a channel at its center (1,2,3). VCP homo-hexamers associate with a variety of protein cofactors to form many distinct protein complexes, which act as chaperones to unfold proteins and transport them to specific cellular compartments or to the proteosome (4). These protein complexes participate in many cellular functions, including vesicle transport and fusion, fragmentation and reassembly of the golgi stacks during mitosis, nuclear envelope formation and spindle disassembly following mitosis, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage repair, apoptosis, B- and T-cell activation, NF-κB-mediated transcriptional regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and protein degradation (4). VCP appears to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum; however, tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with relocalization to the centrosome during mitosis (5). In addition, following cellular exposure to ionizing radition, VCP is phosphorylated at Ser784 in an ATM-dependent manner and accumulates in the nucleus at sites of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) (6). Exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents such as UV light, bleomycin or doxorubicin results in phosphorylation of VCP by ATR and DNA-PK in an ATM-independent manner (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells. VEGF and its close relatives VEGF-B, -C and -D form a subfamily within PDGF family of growth factors, which belongs to the cysteine knot class of cytokines. Five VEGF isoforms of 121, 145, 165, 189 and 206 amino acids (VEGF121–206) are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene (1).The various VEGF forms bind to three tyrosine-kinase receptors, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 which are expressed almost exclusively in endothelial cells. VEGFR-2 is the main angiogenic signal transducer for VEGF, while VEGFR-3 is specific for VEGF-C and -D and is necessary and sufficient for lymphangiogenic signaling. However, upon proteolytic processing VEGF-C and -D gain the ability to also bind and activate VEGFR-2 (2). Guided by the binding properties of the ligands, the VEGFRs are able to form both homodimers and heterodimers. Receptor dimerization is accompanied by activation of receptor kinase activity leading to receptor autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated receptors recruit interacting proteins and induce downstream signaling (3). Recently, tumor therapies based on neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFRs have been developed. These new strategies for tumor treatment show the clinical relevance of inhibiting VEGF signal transduction pathways that are exaggerated in pathological angiogenesis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells. VEGF and its close relatives VEGF-B, -C and -D form a subfamily within PDGF family of growth factors, which belongs to the cysteine knot class of cytokines. Five VEGF isoforms of 121, 145, 165, 189 and 206 amino acids (VEGF121–206) are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene (1).The various VEGF forms bind to three tyrosine-kinase receptors, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 which are expressed almost exclusively in endothelial cells. VEGFR-2 is the main angiogenic signal transducer for VEGF, while VEGFR-3 is specific for VEGF-C and -D and is necessary and sufficient for lymphangiogenic signaling. However, upon proteolytic processing VEGF-C and -D gain the ability to also bind and activate VEGFR-2 (2). Guided by the binding properties of the ligands, the VEGFRs are able to form both homodimers and heterodimers. Receptor dimerization is accompanied by activation of receptor kinase activity leading to receptor autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated receptors recruit interacting proteins and induce downstream signaling (3). Recently, tumor therapies based on neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFRs have been developed. These new strategies for tumor treatment show the clinical relevance of inhibiting VEGF signal transduction pathways that are exaggerated in pathological angiogenesis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is a substrate recognition component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing elongin BC (TCEB1 and TCEB2), cullin 1 (CUL1), and RING-box protein 1 (RBX1) (1,2,3). VHL protein has been shown to exist as three distinct isoforms resulting from alternatively spliced transcript variants (4). Loss of VHL protein function results in a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome that manifests as angiomas of the retina, hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system, renal clear-cell carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas (4). Under normoxic conditions, VHL directs the ubiquitylation and subsequent proteosomal degradation of the hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), maintaining very low levels of HIF-1α in the cell. Cellular exposure to hypoxic conditions, or loss of VHL protein function, results in increased HIF-1α protein levels and increased expression of HIF-induced gene products, many of which are angiogenesis factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, loss of VHL protein function is believed to contribute to the formation of highly vascular neoplasias (4). In addition to HIF-1α, VHL is known to regulate the ubiquitylation of several other proteins, including tat-binding protein 1 (TBP-1), the atypical protein kinase C lambda (aPKC), and two subunits of the multiprotein RNA Polymerase II complex (RPB1 and RPB7) (5,6,7,8). Interactions with elongin BC, RPB1, RPB7 and the pVHL-associated KRAB-A domain containing protein (VHLaK) suggest that VHL may also play a more direct role in transcriptional repression.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Villin is a member of the gelsolin family of calcium-regulated actin-binding proteins. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed gelsolin, villin expression is restricted to simple epithelia of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It is localized to the apical cytoplasm and brush borders of these cells. Villin functions in the regulation of actin dynamics in the apical epithelium, capping, nucleating and/or severing actin filaments in a calcium-dependent manner and regulating cell shape in response to external stimuli (1,2). Phosphorylation of villin at Tyr60, 81 and 256 may be involved in the regulation of cell migration (3). Expression of villin is increased in colorectal cancers (4), and villin1 function appears to be involved in progressive cholestasis and hepatic failure (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 26A (VPS26A), together with VPS29 and VPS35, is part of a trimeric protein complex known as the cargo-selective complex (CSC) (1). The CSC is regarded as the core functional component of the retromer, a multimeric protein complex involved in selective transport of cargo proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network or plasma membrane (2). As part of the CSC, VPS26A does not have intrinsic membrane-binding activity but relies on association with RAB7A for recruitment to the cytosolic face of the endosomal membrane (3,4). Retromer defects are associated with neurological disease, and VPS26A mutations have been linked to perturbed endosomal cargo sorting in atypical parkinsonism (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) proteins are a new group of Ser/Thr kinases in the human kinome. This mammalian kinase family comprises three members, VRK1, VRK2, and VRK3 (1-3). The VRK1 has autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates several transcription factors, including p53 (4), ATF2 (5), and c-Jun (6). VRK2 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (7). VRK3 suppresses Erk activity through direct interaction and activation of the MAP kinase phosphatase VHR (8). Further functional and structural analysis of VRK proteins will elucidate important new aspects of cell regulation.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: WW-domain binding protein 2 (WBP2) is an adaptor protein first identified in a screen for proteins that interact with YAP1 (1). WBP2 was subsequently shown to bind other WW domain-containing proteins, including TAZ and NEDD4-like ubiquitin-protein ligases (2-5). There is strong evidence for a conserved functional role for WBP2 in the Hippo kinase tumor suppressor pathway. WBP2 interaction is required for the oncogenic properties of TAZ in breast cancer cells (4) and the growth-promoting properties of the YAP homolog Yorkie in Drosophila (6). In vitro studies have also suggested that WBP2 may act as a transcriptional co-activator of both estrogen and progesterone receptors (7); this interaction was shown to be dependent upon tyrosine phosphorylation of WBP2 by c-Src and c-Yes kinases (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wolfram syndrome protein (WFS1) is an 890 amino acid protein that contains a cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, followed by nine-transmembrane domains and a luminal C-terminal domain. WFS1 is predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (1) and its expression is induced in response to ER stress, partially through transcriptional activation (2,3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene lead to Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder defined by young-onset, non-immune, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1) is a secreted protein that binds to Wnt proteins and inhibits their activity (1). It contains an N-terminal WIF domain and five EGF-like repeats (2). The WIF1 ortholog in Drosophila, Shifted, is required for Hedgehog stability and diffusion (3,4). It has been reported that WIF1 expression is downregulated in many types of cancers (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WNK [with no lysine (K)] family of serine/threonine kinases is characterized by having a cysteine in place of lysine in subdomain II of its kinase activation domain (1,2). The lysine necessary for phosphoryl transfer is located in an atypical position in the catalytic domain. Four WNK family members have been identified in humans (WNK1-4) and have been implicated in regulating ion permeability (3). Mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant disorder leading to hypertension, hyperkalemia, and renal tubular acidosis (4). WNK4 is specifically expressed in the kidney, whereas WNK1 has a wider distribution but is predominantly expressed in polarized epithelia (1-3). Heterozygous mutations in WNK1 in mice result in a significant decrease in blood pressure, while homozygous mutations are embryonic lethal (5). WNK1 is phosphorylated by Akt at Thr60 (6). In addition, WNK1 may be autophosphorylated at Ser382 in the activation loop, and this is thought to be required for its kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WNK [with no lysine (K)] family of serine/threonine kinases is characterized by having a cysteine in place of lysine in subdomain II of its kinase activation domain (1,2). The lysine necessary for phosphoryl transfer is located in an atypical position in the catalytic domain. Four WNK family members have been identified in humans (WNK1-4) and have been implicated in regulating ion permeability (3). Mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant disorder leading to hypertension, hyperkalemia, and renal tubular acidosis (4). WNK4 is specifically expressed in the kidney, whereas WNK1 has a wider distribution but is predominantly expressed in polarized epithelia (1-3). Heterozygous mutations in WNK1 in mice result in a significant decrease in blood pressure, while homozygous mutations are embryonic lethal (5). WNK1 is phosphorylated by Akt at Thr60 (6). In addition, WNK1 may be autophosphorylated at Ser382 in the activation loop, and this is thought to be required for its kinase activity (7).