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Product listing: WAVE-3 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9UPY6 #2806 to ZMYND8 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9ULU4 #97845

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: WW-domain binding protein 2 (WBP2) is an adaptor protein first identified in a screen for proteins that interact with YAP1 (1). WBP2 was subsequently shown to bind other WW domain-containing proteins, including TAZ and NEDD4-like ubiquitin-protein ligases (2-5). There is strong evidence for a conserved functional role for WBP2 in the Hippo kinase tumor suppressor pathway. WBP2 interaction is required for the oncogenic properties of TAZ in breast cancer cells (4) and the growth-promoting properties of the YAP homolog Yorkie in Drosophila (6). In vitro studies have also suggested that WBP2 may act as a transcriptional co-activator of both estrogen and progesterone receptors (7); this interaction was shown to be dependent upon tyrosine phosphorylation of WBP2 by c-Src and c-Yes kinases (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wolfram syndrome protein (WFS1) is an 890 amino acid protein that contains a cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, followed by nine-transmembrane domains and a luminal C-terminal domain. WFS1 is predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (1) and its expression is induced in response to ER stress, partially through transcriptional activation (2,3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene lead to Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder defined by young-onset, non-immune, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1) is a secreted protein that binds to Wnt proteins and inhibits their activity (1). It contains an N-terminal WIF domain and five EGF-like repeats (2). The WIF1 ortholog in Drosophila, Shifted, is required for Hedgehog stability and diffusion (3,4). It has been reported that WIF1 expression is downregulated in many types of cancers (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WNK [with no lysine (K)] family of serine/threonine kinases is characterized by having a cysteine in place of lysine in subdomain II of its kinase activation domain (1,2). The lysine necessary for phosphoryl transfer is located in an atypical position in the catalytic domain. Four WNK family members have been identified in humans (WNK1-4) and have been implicated in regulating ion permeability (3). Mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant disorder leading to hypertension, hyperkalemia, and renal tubular acidosis (4). WNK4 is specifically expressed in the kidney, whereas WNK1 has a wider distribution but is predominantly expressed in polarized epithelia (1-3). Heterozygous mutations in WNK1 in mice result in a significant decrease in blood pressure, while homozygous mutations are embryonic lethal (5). WNK1 is phosphorylated by Akt at Thr60 (6). In addition, WNK1 may be autophosphorylated at Ser382 in the activation loop, and this is thought to be required for its kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WNK [with no lysine (K)] family of serine/threonine kinases is characterized by having a cysteine in place of lysine in subdomain II of its kinase activation domain (1,2). The lysine necessary for phosphoryl transfer is located in an atypical position in the catalytic domain. Four WNK family members have been identified in humans (WNK1-4) and have been implicated in regulating ion permeability (3). Mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant disorder leading to hypertension, hyperkalemia, and renal tubular acidosis (4). WNK4 is specifically expressed in the kidney, whereas WNK1 has a wider distribution but is predominantly expressed in polarized epithelia (1-3). Heterozygous mutations in WNK1 in mice result in a significant decrease in blood pressure, while homozygous mutations are embryonic lethal (5). WNK1 is phosphorylated by Akt at Thr60 (6). In addition, WNK1 may be autophosphorylated at Ser382 in the activation loop, and this is thought to be required for its kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human WSTF gene is located within the common Williams Syndrome (WS) deletion area at chromosome 7q11.23. Several WSTF gene products have been detected with little difference in length of polypeptides (1-3). Functional motifs identified by sequence-homology searches include a PHD-type zinc finger motif followed by a bromodomain. Both motifs are found in many transcription factors, suggesting that WSTF may function as a transcription factor. A Drosophila gene (acf1) was cloned, which encodes two forms of Acf1 proteins with molecular weight 170 kDa and 185 kDa, respectively (4). It was demonstrated that Acf1 is structurally related to the human WSTF gene. Acf1 forms a complex with another protein, ISWI, and functions in the ATP-dependent catalysis of chromatin assembly (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) gene encodes a protein with two WW domains followed by a short-chain dehydrogenase domain that was identified from a genomic region 16q23 of high instability, FRA16D (1,2). The mouse homolog, termed Wox1, was found to enhance TNFα-mediated apoptosis (3). The WWOX gene is disrupted in a many cancer types by deletions or translocation which has revealed a tumor suppressor function (4-7). In contrast, high levels of WWOX have been shown in shown in premetastic cancers, including breast and prostate (8-10). Stress stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation within the first WW domain (Tyr33), followed by nuclear translocation and binding to and stabilizing the p53 tumor suppressor protein (11). WWOX and p53 can induce apoptosis in a synergistic manner. Tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of WWOX has been implicated in the progression of cancers to metastatic states (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The x(c)(-) cysteine/glutamate antiporter consists of a light chain subunit (xCT/SLC7A11) that confers substrate specificity and a glycosylated heavy chain subunit (4F2hc/SLC3A2) located on the cell surface (1,2). The heterodimeric amino acid transport system x(c)(-) provides selective import of cysteine into cells in exchange for glutamate and regulating intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, which is essential for cellular protection from oxidative stress (3). Research studies have shown that xCT expression increases in various tumors, including gliomas, and have implicated xCT in GSH-mediated anticancer drug resistance (4,5). Researchers have found that xCT provides neuroprotection by enhancing glutathione export from non-neuronal cells (6). Moreover, investigators identified xCT as the fusion-entry receptor for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Double stranded DNA breaks (DSB’s) are the most toxic of DNA lesions. They occur in response to genotoxic stress, and they are also an obligate intermediate in the V(D)J recombination events in the immune system. The mechanism by which cells deal with DSB’s is known as NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining), and involves a core group of proteins that includes Ku, DNA-PK, XRCC4, and XLF (1). XLF, also known as Cernunnos, was originally discovered as a mutated protein from cells of individuals who displayed features of growth retardation, microcephaly, and immunodeficiency (2). These cells were sensitive to ionizing radiation and defective in V(D)J recombination. Exogenous expression of wild type XLF corrected these deficiencies (3), indicating that XLF is a critical component of the NHEJ response. XLF physically interacts with and may stimulate the ligase activity of XRCC4 (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) is a DNA repair protein important in both single strand break repair and base excision repair following damage from ionizing radiation and alkylating agents (1). XRCC1 acts as a scaffold protein to coordinate DNA abasic site repair through interaction with several other repair proteins (2). At least eight XRCC1 protein partners have been identified, including the polynucleotide kinase PNK (3), DNA ligase III (4,5), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (6), and PCNA (7). Mutations and polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene serve as diagnostic markers and are associated with elevated risk of various forms of cancers (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: 5’-3’ exoribonuclease 1 (XRN1) is a cytoplasmic exonuclease that degrades RNA containing a 5’-monophosphate to component mononucleotides. XRN1 is the primary exonuclease associated with ribosomes in the cytoplasm and is responsible for mRNA turnover (1,2). This turnover is facilitated in discrete structures in the cytoplasm called P-bodies that contain decapping and deadenylation proteins (3). XRN1 also plays a role in RISC-mediated mRNA degradation, as it associates with 3’ mRNA fragments generated by RISC cleavage. This process does not require uncapping or deadenylation (4). XRN1 plays a significant role in viral RNA degradation (5). As such, many viral genomes, including hepatitis C, Dengue, and West Nile, encode for XRN1-resistant long non-coding RNA that affect innate immunity and viral replication (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cellular oncogene c-Yes and its viral homologue v-Yes (the transforming gene of Yamaguchi 73 and Esh avian sarcoma viruses) encode a 60 kDa, cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, protein-tyrosine kinase (1). Yes belongs to the Src kinase family and is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues and cells. Like other Src family members, Yes contains several conserved functional domains such as an N-terminal myristoylation sequence for membrane targeting, SH2 and SH3 domains, a kinase domain, and a C-terminal non-catalytic domain (2). Although several lines of evidence support redundancy in signaling between Yes and other Src family kinases, there is also a growing body of evidence indicating specificity in Yes signaling (2). Yes is activated downstream of a multitude of cell surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and cytokine receptors (3). In addition, both Yes and Src kinases are activated during the cell cycle transition from G2 to M phase (3). Investigators have found that dysfunction of Yes is associated with the development of various cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant RNA modification that plays an important role in mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. The m6A modification is specifically recognized by members of the YT521B homology (YTH) domain-containing family (YTHDF), consisting of YTHDF1, YTHDF2, and YTHDF3. All three members of the YTHDF family are primarily cytosolic proteins that share similar sequence and domain structure, including a conserved C-terminal YTH domain that specifically interacts with m6A (1). Despite these similarities, recent studies suggest that YTHDF proteins are involved in distinct regulatory functions with minimal overlap. Specifically, YTHDF1 binding has been reported to promote enhanced mRNA translation, but has no measurable effect on mRNA stability (2). Conversely, YTHDF2 binding appears to promote mRNA degradation, but has minimal effect on translation efficiency (3). The function of YTHDF3 is less clear, but it has been proposed to function as an auxiliary protein for both YTHDF1 and YTHDF2, helping to promote either increased mRNA translation or decay, respectively (4). Additional studies offer a different viewpoint, suggesting that all three YTHDF proteins initiate mRNA degradation (5), or mediate increased mRNA stability and protein expression (6), promoting the idea that these proteins may carry out similar rather than distinct functions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ZBP1 (Z-DNA binding protein 1), also referred to as DAI (DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors) and DLM-1, is a nucleotide binding protein that plays a role in tumorigenesis and innate immune responses to viral infection (1). It is expressed at high levels in lymphatic tissues and intestine and is induced in macrophages by interferon gamma or by LPS (2,3). It contains two amino terminal Z-alpha domains that bind to left-handed Z-DNA and Z-RNA (4,5). In addition, an adjacent domain binds right-handed B-DNA that allows for it to function as a cytosolic DNA sensor in innate immune responses, triggering activation of TBK1 and IRF-3, and subsequent production of type I interferons (6,7). Furthermore, ZBP1 can trigger the activation of NF-κB through interaction with the RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) of RIPK1 and RIPK3 (8). ZBP1 binding to RIPK3 can also induce a process of programmed necrosis termed necroptosis (9). In contrast, its interaction with RIPK1 can repress necroptosis (10,11). The mRNA binding activity of ZBP1 is also thought to play a role in tumorigenesis. ZBP1 is repressed in metastatic breast cancer, which leads to dysregulation of mRNA targets involved in proliferation and metastasis (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Zinc finger MYND domain-containing protein 8 (ZMYND8), also referred to as receptor for activated C-kinase 7 (Rack7) and protein kinase C-binding protein 1 (PRKCBP1), is a DNA damage response protein and a transcriptional regulator that is a close homolog of ZMYND11 (BS69) (1). ZMYND8 binds to H3K36me2 and H4K16ac, two histone marks associated with active transcription (2). This protein is targeted to sites of DNA damage within actively transcribed genes, and recruits the H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase KDM5A/JARID1A and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) complex (1-3). Together, these protein complexes mediate transcriptional repression and allow for subsequent double-strand break repair via homologous recombination. ZMYND8 contains a bromodomain and a PWWP domain near its N-terminus, and a MYND domain towards the C-terminus, the latter of which mediates interaction with the NuRD complex (1). ZMYND8 also functions to recruit the H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase KDM5C/JARID1C to enhancer and super-enhancer regions, and functions as a negative regulator of gene expression (4). ZMYND8 and JARID1C are both putative tumor suppressor proteins, and knockdown of either of these proteins leads to derepression of S100 oncogenes (1). ZMYND8 expression is altered in breast and cervical cancer (4, 5), and has been found to be translocated with RELA in at least one patient with acute erythroid leukemia (6). Knock-down of ZMYND8 expression in breast cancer cell lines increases anchorage-independent cell growth, cell migration and invasion, and tumor growth in mouse xenograft models (4).