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Product listing: APC8 (D5O2D) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9UJX2 #15100 to Argonaute 1 (D84G10) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9UL18 #5053

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic cell proliferation depends strictly upon the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose main function is to trigger the transition of the cell cycle from metaphase to anaphase. The APC/C complex promotes the assembly of polyubiquitin chains on substrate proteins in order to target these proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome (1,2). The vertebrate APC/C complex consists of as many as 15 subunits, including multiple scaffold proteins, two catalytic subunits (APC2, APC11), and a number of proteins responsible for substrate recognition (3). All E3 enzymes, including APC/C, utilize ubiquitin residues activated by E1 enzymes and transferred to E2 enzymes. Research studies indicate that APC/C interacts with the E2 enzymes UBE2S and UBE2C via the RING-finger domain-containing subunit APC11 (4-6). APC/C function relies on multiple cofactors, including an APC/C coactivator formed by the cell division control protein 20 homolog (CDC20) and Cdh1/FZR1. The CDC20/Cdh1 coactivator is responsible for recognition of APC/C substrates through interaction with specific D-box and KEN-box recognition elements within these substrates (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ape1 (Apurinic/Apyrimidic eEndonuclease 1), also known as Ref1 (Redox effector factor 1), is a multifunctional protein with several biological activities. These include roles in DNA repair and in the cellular response to oxidative stress. Ape1 initiates the repair of abasic sites and is essential for the base excision repair (BER) pathway (1). Repair activities of Ape1 are stimulated by interaction with XRCC1 (2), another essential protein in BER. Ape1 functions as a redox factor that maintains transcription factors in an active, reduced state but can also function in a redox-independent manner as a transcriptional cofactor to control different cellular fates such as apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (3). Increased expression of Ape1 is associated with many types of cancers including cervical, ovarian, prostate, rhabdomyosarcomas and germ cell tumors (4). Ape1 has been shown to stimulate DNA binding of several transcription factors known to be involved in tumor progression such as Fos, Jun, NF-κB, PAX, HIF-1, HLF and p53 (4). Mutation of the Ape1 gene has also been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ApoAI (Apolipoprotein A1) is a major component of high density lipoprotein (HDL, the “good cholesterol”) in plasma. It is produced in the liver and small intestine. ApoA1 is a cofactor for lecithin cholesterolacyltransferase (LCAT) that is responsible for the formation of plasma cholesteryl esters and promotes cholesterol efflux from tissues to the liver for excretion. Defects in ApoA1 are associated with high density lipoprotein deficiency (HDLD) and systemic non-neuropathic amyloidosis (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the APOBEC3 subfamily of cytosine deaminases (APOBEC3A, APOBEC3B, APOBEC3C, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H) function in innate immunity by preventing viral DNA replication, including that of HIV-1 (1-2). APOBEC3B mutation and aberrant expression in cancer is thought to result in mutation of genomic DNA, and to drive tumorigenesis. APOBEC3B is highly expressed in human breast cancer, glioma, and other human cancers (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: APOBEC3G, a single-strand DNA deaminase that converts deoxycytidine to deoxyuridine (1-3), is a cellular restriction factor blocking the replication of retroviruses (3). It suppresses the replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) in T-cells by being packaged into progeny virions and deaminating cytosine to uracil in the nascent minus-strand viral DNA, leading to the accumulation of mutations in the viral genome (1-4). The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) inhibits APOBEC3G activity by preventing its incorporation into progeny virions (4,5). In addition, Vif targets APOBEC3G for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The APPL1 multidomain adaptor protein is a BAR-domain protein family member that is involved in membrane trafficking within a number of signal transduction pathways (1). The amino-terminal BAR domain mediates the formation of crescent-shaped APPL1 homodimers (or APPL1 and APPL2 heterodimers) important to lipid binding and membrane curvature sensing (1). The PH domain of APPL1 is required for binding of the adaptor protein to Rab5 GTPase (2). In response to extracellular stimuli, Rab5 GTP hydrolysis releases APPL1 from the endosome and allows translocation of APPL1 to the nucleus where it joins a protein complex that controls chromatin remodeling and gene expression (3). The carboxy-terminal PTB domain of APPL1 enables an interaction between APPL1 and the TrkA neurotrophin receptor. An association between these two proteins and the TrkA-interacting protein GIPC1 within endosomes is required for nerve growth factor mediated signaling (4). APPL1 also binds follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptors, which may provide a relay of FSH signaling to the PI3K/Akt pathway (5). The APPL1 adaptor protein is implicated in insulin signaling, as interaction between APPL1 and Akt2 is required for insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 receptor proteins. Both induced overexpression and knockdown of APPL1 inhibit insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation (6). APPL1 binds the adiponectin receptor and acts as a downstream effector in the adiponectin pathway to mediate NO production (7,8). APPL1 interacts with DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer) protein and may play a role in DCC-induced apoptosis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aprataxin is a DNA repair protein that resolves DNA lesions (DNA adenylates) caused by abortive ligations in single-strand break repair, double-strand break repair and base excision repair (1). Aprataxin is recruited to sites of DNA damage by PARP1 (2). In the mitochondria, aprataxin and tyrosyl-DNA-phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) are required for repair of single strand breaks caused primarily by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (3).The gene for aprataxin, APTX, is defective in the neurodegenerative disorder oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1)(4). Researchers have shown that levels of aprataxin can predict patient response to irinotecan-based treatments in colorectal cancer (5).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporins (AQP) are integral membrane proteins that serve as channels in the transfer of water and small solutes across the membrane. There are 13 isoforms of AQP that express in different types of cells and tissues (1,2). AQP1 is found in blood vessels, kidney, eye, and ear. AQP2 is found in the kidney, and it has been shown that the lack of AQP2 results in diabetes (1,3). AQP4 is present in the brain, where it is enriched in astrocytes (1,2,4). AQP5 is found in the salivary and lacrimal gland, AQP6 in intracellular vesicles in the kidney, AQP7 in adipocytes, AQP8 in kidney, testis, and liver, AQP9 is present in liver and leukocytes and AQP10-11 in the intestine (1,3,4). AQPs are essential for the function of cells and organs. It has been shown that AQP1 and AQP4 regulate the water homeostasis in astrocytes, preventing cerebral edema caused by solute imbalance (5). Several studies have shown the involvement of AQPs in the development of inflammatory processes, including cells of innate and adaptive immunity (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial carriers are integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane that transport metabolites, nucleotides, and co-factors between the cytosol and the mitochondria (1). The calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein ARALAR (SLC25A12, AGC1) is an aspartate-glutamate exchange protein responsible for transporting mitochondrial aspartate across the mitochondrial inner membrane in exchange for cytosolic glutamate (2,3). ARALAR and other proteins of the aspartate-glutamate carrier (AGC) group are required for the transfer of mitochondrial aspartate to the cytosol, a key step in urea synthesis (4). Research studies using ARALAR-knockout mice indicate that ARALAR plays an important role in proper CNS myelination. Mice lacking ARALAR suffer from hypomyelination as a result of a lack of oligodendrocyte maturation caused by decreased brain N-acetylaspartate levels (5). Mutation of the corresponding SLC25A12 gene can result in global cerebral hypomyelination and severe psychomotor retardation, caused by deficient ARALAR activity and limited mitochondrial aspartate efflux (6).

$305
50 assays
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ARC (D7Q3G) Rabbit mAb #38916.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), also independently identified as muscle-enriched cytoplasmic protein (MYP), is a CARD domain protein that regulates apoptosis (1). The ARC protein CARD domain is highly homologous to those in other cell death regulators, including caspase-2, caspase-9, RAIDD, and Apaf-1 (2). The NOL3 gene encodes both the cytoplasmic ARC protein and a 30 kDa nucleolar protein (Nop30) that is involved in RNA splicing. ARC is encoded from isoform 2 of NOL3, while isoform 1 produced by alternative splicing encodes Nop30. Both ARC and Nop30 proteins share common amino-terminal sequences (3). Research studies show that ARC can bind to caspase-8 and caspase-2 and inhibit apoptosis through extrinsic pathways that involve the receptor proteins Fas, TNFR1, and DR3 (1). Additional research indicates that the ARC anti-apoptotic mechanism may include both intrinsic (mitochondrial) and extrinsic (death receptor) pathways (4). In addition to binding caspases, ARC can disrupt the interaction with the death domains of Fas and FADD, which inhibits death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) assembly. The CARD domain of ARC can inhibit intrinsic apoptosis through binding to the pro-apoptotic Bax protein (5). Phosphorylation of ARC at Thr149 by CK2 is required for targeting of ARC to the mitochondria (6). ARC is able to suppress necroptosis, a programmed pathway of necrosis triggered by blocking the recruitment of RIP1 to TNFR1 (7). Expression of ARC protein is predominantly seen in terminally differentiated cells under normal conditions and is markedly induced in a variety of cancers including pancreatic, colorectal, breast, lung, glioblastoma, liver, kidney, melanoma, and acute myeloid leukemia (1, 8-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), also independently identified as muscle-enriched cytoplasmic protein (MYP), is a CARD domain protein that regulates apoptosis (1). The ARC protein CARD domain is highly homologous to those in other cell death regulators, including caspase-2, caspase-9, RAIDD, and Apaf-1 (2). The NOL3 gene encodes both the cytoplasmic ARC protein and a 30 kDa nucleolar protein (Nop30) that is involved in RNA splicing. ARC is encoded from isoform 2 of NOL3, while isoform 1 produced by alternative splicing encodes Nop30. Both ARC and Nop30 proteins share common amino-terminal sequences (3). Research studies show that ARC can bind to caspase-8 and caspase-2 and inhibit apoptosis through extrinsic pathways that involve the receptor proteins Fas, TNFR1, and DR3 (1). Additional research indicates that the ARC anti-apoptotic mechanism may include both intrinsic (mitochondrial) and extrinsic (death receptor) pathways (4). In addition to binding caspases, ARC can disrupt the interaction with the death domains of Fas and FADD, which inhibits death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) assembly. The CARD domain of ARC can inhibit intrinsic apoptosis through binding to the pro-apoptotic Bax protein (5). Phosphorylation of ARC at Thr149 by CK2 is required for targeting of ARC to the mitochondria (6). ARC is able to suppress necroptosis, a programmed pathway of necrosis triggered by blocking the recruitment of RIP1 to TNFR1 (7). Expression of ARC protein is predominantly seen in terminally differentiated cells under normal conditions and is markedly induced in a variety of cancers including pancreatic, colorectal, breast, lung, glioblastoma, liver, kidney, melanoma, and acute myeloid leukemia (1, 8-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein acetylation is a common modification that occurs both at lysine residues within proteins (ε-amino acetylation) and multiple amino acid residues at the amino terminus of proteins (α-amino acetylation). The N-α-acetyltransferase ARD1 homolog A protein (ARD1A, also known as NAA10) and the highly homologous N-α-acetyltransferase ARD1 homolog B protein (ARD1B, also known as ARD2 or NAA11) are mutually exclusive catalytic subunits of the amino-terminal acetyltransferase complex (NatA) (1-3). This complex, which consists of either ARD1A or ARD1B and the N-α-acetyltransferase 15 (NAA15) auxiliary protein, localizes to ribosomes where it functions to acetylate Ser-, Ala-, Gly-, Thr-, Cys-, Pro-, and Val- amino termini after initiator methionine cleavage during protein translation (1-5). Like ε-amino acetylation, amino-terminal α-amino acetylation functions to regulate protein stability, activity, cellular localization, and protein-protein interactions (4,5). Defects in ARD1A have been shown to cause amino-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency (NATD), which results in severe delays and defects in postnatal growth (6).In addition to functioning as amino-terminal acetyltransferases in the NatA complex, free ARD1A and ARD1B proteins regulate cell growth and differentiation through ε-amino acetylation of lysine residues in multiple target proteins, including the HIF-1α, β-catenin, and AP-1 transcription factors (7-9). ARD1A-mediated acetylation of HIF-1α at Lys532 under normoxic conditions enhances binding of VHL, leading to increased ubiquitination and degradation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of HIF-1α target genes involved in angiogenesis, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, and glucose metabolism (7). Decreased expression of ARD1A under hypoxic conditions contributes to the stabilization of HIF-1α and upregulation of target genes (7). ARD1A also promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by acetylating and activating β-catenin and AP-1 transcription factors, leading to the stimulation of cyclin D1 expression (8,9). Interestingly, the acetyltransferase activity of ARD1A is regulated by autoacetylation at Lys136, which is required for the ability of ARD1A to promote proliferation and tumorigenesis (9). Research studies have shown that ARD1 proteins are over-expressed in multiple cancers, including breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) proteins are low molecular weight GTP binding proteins that belong to the Ras GTPase superfamily (1). Arf proteins are grouped into three distinct classes based on amino acid sequence and structural similarity, with Arf6 as the single class III protein to date. Arf6 is localized mainly to the plasma membrane and endosomes (1,2). This small GTPase interacts with PIP5K, PLD and Rac1, proteins important in lipid metabolism and actin regulation. Arf6 function depends upon its cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states, which is regulated by associated GAP and GEF factors (3,4). Plasma membrane-associated Arf6 appears to play several functions during the many steps of membrane trafficking, including regulating membrane receptor internalization in both clathrin-dependent and independent pathways, endosomal recycling, and proximal actin reorganization and remodeling (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase activating protein 1 (ARFGAP1) is a Golgi-localized protein that regulates vesicle formation and membrane trafficking (1). ARFGAP1 initiates cargo selection and COP1 vesicle formation by stimulating GTP hydrolysis of ADP-ribosylation factor ARF1 (2). This GTPase activating protein initiates vesicle transport by coupling vesicle formation with cargo sorting (3). ARFGAP1 plays an active role in the Golgi-to-ER retrograde, intra-Golgi, and trans-Golgi trafficking networks (1). Research studies indicate that ARFGAP1 can act as a GTPase activating protein for LRRK2, a large multifunction protein whose genetic mutations are associated with Parkinson’s disease (4). ARFGAP1 regulates GTPase activity and promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2, which suggests some potential as a promising target for study of LRRK2 mediated neurodegeneration (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase activating protein 1 (ARFGAP1) is a Golgi-localized protein that regulates vesicle formation and membrane trafficking (1). ARFGAP1 initiates cargo selection and COP1 vesicle formation by stimulating GTP hydrolysis of ADP-ribosylation factor ARF1 (2). This GTPase activating protein initiates vesicle transport by coupling vesicle formation with cargo sorting (3). ARFGAP1 plays an active role in the Golgi-to-ER retrograde, intra-Golgi, and trans-Golgi trafficking networks (1). Research studies indicate that ARFGAP1 can act as a GTPase activating protein for LRRK2, a large multifunction protein whose genetic mutations are associated with Parkinson’s disease (4). ARFGAP1 regulates GTPase activity and promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2, which suggests some potential as a promising target for study of LRRK2 mediated neurodegeneration (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Arg3.1, also known as Arc for activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, is an immediate early gene whose expression is necessary for synaptic plasticity (1). Arg3.1 expression is induced by many experimental stimuli such as LTP (2), LTD (3), and learning. Arg3.1 is also involved in the regulation of synaptic strength and homeostatic scaling by promoting AMPA receptors endocytosis (5,6). Arg3.1 dysregulation has been proposed to participate in cognitive decline during aging (7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Arginase-1 (D4E3M™) XP® Rabbit mAb #93668.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Arginase-1 (D4E3M™) XP® Rabbit mAb #93668.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Arginase-1 (D4E3M™) XP® Rabbit mAb #93668.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Arginase-1 (D4E3M™) XP® Rabbit mAb #93668.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Arginase-2 is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (1). Research studies have shown that in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, arginase-2 is released from AML blasts to the plasma, leading to the suppression of T-cell proliferation (2). It was also shown that arginase-2 is required for the immunosuppressive properties of neonatal CD71(+) erythroid cells, which inhibits neonatal host defense against infection (3). In addition, the expression of arginase-2 in dendritic cells is repressed by microRNA-155 during maturation (4). This repression is essential for T-cell activation and response (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in higher eukaryotes (1,2). Several classes of small RNAs, including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (3), microRNAs (miRNAs) (4), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) (5), have been identified. MicroRNAs are about 21 nucleotides in length and have been implicated in many cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and stress response (1,2). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by modulating mRNA translation or stability (2). MicroRNAs function together with the protein components in the complexes called micro-ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) (2). Among the most important components in these complexes are Argonaute proteins (1,2). There are four members in the mammalian Argonaute family and only Argonaute 2 (Ago2) possesses the Slicer endonuclease activity (1,2). Argonaute proteins participate in the various steps of microRNA-mediated gene silencing, such as repression of translation and mRNA turnover (1).