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Product listing: Di/Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) (6F12) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P68431 #5327 to DNMT3A (E9P2F) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9Y6K1 #49768

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Formins are a family of large multidomain actin nucleation/polymerization proteins characterized by their catalytic FH2 domains. The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia/diap) subfamily, including mDia1/diap1, mDia2/diap3 and mDia3/diap2, are effectors of Rho family small GTPases. In response to Rho, mDia/diap proteins are involved in the regulation of multiple cell functions including cytoskeletal dynamics, migration, adhesion, polarity and cell shape (reviewed in 1,2).mDia1/diap1 is activated by GTP-bound Rho, leading to Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-dependent stress fiber formation (3,4). Rho activation of mDia1 has also been shown to regulate serum response factor (SRF)-dependent transcription (5), and has been implicated in human cancer phenotypes such as ras-mediated transformation, metastasis and invasion (reviewed in 6).mDia3/diap2, activated by the Rho family small GTPase cdc42, regulates the attachment of microtubules to the kinetochore during mitosis in mammalian cells (7).Rho-dependent activation of mDia2/diap3 is important in assembly of the contractile ring during cytokinesis (8,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Digoxigenin (DIG) is a highly immunogenic steroid derived from “foxglove” plants of the genus Digitalis (1). This small hapten molecule can be covalently linked to proteins, nucleic acids, compounds, and glycans. Antibodies targeted against the DIG hapten display high binding affinity to DIG-conjugated molecules and can be used in molecular biology assays, including in situ hybridization, western blot, ELISA, and TUNEL assays (2-4).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Digoxigenin (D8Q9J) Rabbit mAb #14682.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Digoxigenin (DIG) is a highly immunogenic steroid derived from “foxglove” plants of the genus Digitalis (1). This small hapten molecule can be covalently linked to proteins, nucleic acids, compounds, and glycans. Antibodies targeted against the DIG hapten display high binding affinity to DIG-conjugated molecules and can be used in molecular biology assays, including in situ hybridization, western blot, ELISA, and TUNEL assays (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The synthetic compound dinitrophenol (DNP) is a small hapten molecule that can be conjugated to proteins for use in immunoassays (1). Antibodies that recognize dinitrophenol will display strong binding affinity to DNP conjugated molecules, including nucleic acids and proteins. These DNP-conjugated compounds can be used in in situ hybridization, western, northern, and Southern blotting (1,2). Dinitrophenol is a commonly used insecticide and has been used as a treatment for weight loss (3).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Dinitrophenol (D1D6) Rabbit mAb #14681.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The synthetic compound dinitrophenol (DNP) is a small hapten molecule that can be conjugated to proteins for use in immunoassays (1). Antibodies that recognize dinitrophenol will display strong binding affinity to DNP conjugated molecules, including nucleic acids and proteins. These DNP-conjugated compounds can be used in in situ hybridization, western, northern, and Southern blotting (1,2). Dinitrophenol is a commonly used insecticide and has been used as a treatment for weight loss (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (intracellular inclusions) and by the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Research studies have shown that mutations in α-synuclein, Parkin, and DJ-1 are linked to PD (1). α-synuclein is a major component of the aggregates found in Lewy bodies. Parkin is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and investigators have shown that mutations in Parkin cause early onset of PD (1). Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of PD, but DJ-1 is associated with multiple functions: it cooperates with Ras to increase cell transformation, it positively regulates transcription of the androgen receptor, and it may function as an indicator of oxidative stress (2-5). Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated functions are greatly impaired in DJ-1 (-/-) mice, resulting in reduced long-term depression (6).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DJ-1 (D29E5) XP® Rabbit mAb #5933.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (intracellular inclusions) and by the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Research studies have shown that mutations in α-synuclein, Parkin, and DJ-1 are linked to PD (1). α-synuclein is a major component of the aggregates found in Lewy bodies. Parkin is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and investigators have shown that mutations in Parkin cause early onset of PD (1). Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of PD, but DJ-1 is associated with multiple functions: it cooperates with Ras to increase cell transformation, it positively regulates transcription of the androgen receptor, and it may function as an indicator of oxidative stress (2-5). Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated functions are greatly impaired in DJ-1 (-/-) mice, resulting in reduced long-term depression (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (intracellular inclusions) and by the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Research studies have shown that mutations in α-synuclein, Parkin, and DJ-1 are linked to PD (1). α-synuclein is a major component of the aggregates found in Lewy bodies. Parkin is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and investigators have shown that mutations in Parkin cause early onset of PD (1). Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of PD, but DJ-1 is associated with multiple functions: it cooperates with Ras to increase cell transformation, it positively regulates transcription of the androgen receptor, and it may function as an indicator of oxidative stress (2-5). Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated functions are greatly impaired in DJ-1 (-/-) mice, resulting in reduced long-term depression (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dickkopf (DKK) family proteins consist of four members DKK1, DKK2, DKK3 and DKK4 that function as secreted Wnt antagonists by inhibiting Wnt coreceptors LRP5 and LRP6 (1,2). DKKs contain two cysteine-rich domains in which the positions of 10 cysteine residues are well conserved (3). Their expression is both temporally and spatially regulated during animal development (4). DKKs also bind with high affinity to transmembrane proteins Kremen1 and 2, which themselves also modulate Wnt signaling (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (DLAT) transfers an acetyl group from pyruvate to CoA to synthesize acetyl-CoA (1-4). This protein, also known as the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), has been implicated in the literature as the primary autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis (2-5). Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) are likely formed when DLAT is exposed to the immune system in apoptotic cells of the bile duct (3,5). Research studies have shown that in some cases, cosmetics, NSAIDs, chewing gum, acetaminophen, and other compounds could trigger exposure of DLAT in sensitive individuals (3). The presence of AMAs is often detectable before disease diagnosis (4,5). Research studies have also shown that activation of the Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) pathway is involved in the progression from a subclinical to clinical state (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)-associated protein 1 (DMAP1) is a nuclear protein that functions in transcriptional repression and DNA repair. DMAP1 was first identified as an activator of DNMT1 methyltransferase activity (1). Both DMAP1 and DNMT1 are targeted to replication foci during S phase and function to transfer proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication (1). In late S phase, DMAP1-DNMT1 co-operate with a p33ING1-Sin3-HDAC2 complex to maintain pericentric heterochromatin by deacetylating histones, methylating histone H3 at Lys9, and methylating DNA (1,2). The DMAP1 protein is also part of the TIP60-p400 complex, a histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and chromatin-remodeling complex that functions in DNA repair (3,4). Upon DNA damage, the TIP60-p400 complex acetylates histone H4 at Lys16 to induce chromatin relaxation and activation of the ATM kinase. DMAP1 is required for DNA-damage induced TIP60-p400-mediated histone acetylation, and deletion of DMAP1 impairs AMT function (5). DMAP1-DNMT1 may also methylate DNA at sites of DNA damage during homologous recombination, which results in gene silencing (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1, SLC11A2, NRAMP2) is a transmembrane metal ion transport protein that plays critical roles in non-heme iron absorption in the intestine and iron acquisition by erythroid precursor cells (1,2). Following the cellular uptake of iron, DMT1 transfers ferric iron from the endosomes to the cytoplasm (3,4). The DMT1 protein can transport up to eight different metals, including iron, manganese, cobalt, and cadmium (5). Four mammalian DMT1 isoforms are expressed in various tissues and are differentially regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level (6,7). Mutations in the corresponding SLC11A2 gene can result in hypochromic microcytic anemia and iron overload. Aberrant iron transport in these individuals results in erythroid hyperplasia, high serum iron, and impaired liver function (8-10). Research studies show elevated DMT1 levels and iron accumulation in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients and the corresponding animal model (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Cells detect and repair DSBs through two distinct but partly overlapping signaling pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). DNA repair through the HR pathway is restricted to S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while NHEJ can occur during any cell cycle phase. Defects in both pathways have been associated with human disease, including cancer (1).DNA repair through the NHEJ pathway involves a core group of proteins that includes the Ku heterodimer, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, and XLF. XLF interacts with XRCC4 and promotes the ligation of DNA strands by DNA ligase IV and the ligase cofactor XRCC4. The ATP-dependent ligation of free DNA ends is the final step in the NHEJ repair pathway (2). Research studies suggest that XLF and XRCC4 proteins form complexes that bridge DNA breaks earlier in the NHEJ pathway (3). Additional studies indicate that localization of XRCC4 to the nucleus and levels of XRCC4 protein are both regulated by DNA ligase IV (4). Mutations in the corresponding LIG4 gene are associated with LIG4 syndrome, a disorder characterized by immunodeficiency and developmental growth delay. Cells isolated from patients diagnosed with LIG4 syndrome display typical cell cycle checkpoint activity, but aberrant rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA polymerase γ (POLG, pol gamma) is a nuclear encoded protein that is responsible for mitochondrial genome replication in eukaryotic cells. The 140 kDa polymerase γ catalytic subunit forms a holoenzyme complex with a 55 kDa accessory protein (POLG2, pol γB) dimer, which confers processivity (1). In addition to polymerase activity, polymerase γ contains 3'-5' exonuclease activity for proofreading and 5′-deoxyribonucleic phosphate lyase activity that functions in DNA base excision repair (BER). The rate at which the catalytic subunit recognizes damaged DNA during DNA repair is enhanced by the pol γB accessory subunit (2). Mutations in the corresponding POLG gene are associated with several inherited neuropathies including progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum disorders and Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (3,4). Research studies indicate that mutations in the corresponding POLG gene may promote breast tumorigenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A total of fifteen mammalian DNA polymerase enzymes catalyze the synthesis of nascent DNA during DNA replication and repair (1). DNA polymerase eta (POL η, POLH, Rad30) is one of a specialized type of DNA polymerases that function in DNA repair and translesion synthesis (TLS). POLH can accommodate and read through bulky DNA lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, which allows for continued DNA synthesis past lesions and limited stalling of replication forks (2,3). Damage inducing conditions, such as exposure to UV light or cisplatin, recruit POLH to sites of bulky DNA lesions where the polymerase interacts with PCNA (4,5). Mutations in the human POLH gene can result in a form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to light and susceptibility to skin cancer (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DnaJ/Hsp40 proteins are a conserved family of J-domain-containing chaperone proteins that assist in protein folding and stability through their interactions with Hsp70 chaperone proteins (reviewed in 1). DNAJC2, also known as MPP11 (M-phase phosphoprotein 11 protein) or ZRF1, is a component of the ribosome-associated complex (RAC). The RAC is localized to the cytoplasm, where it assists in maintaining appropriate folding of nascent polypeptides by stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70 chaperone proteins (2,3). In the nucleus, MPP11 is involved in the activation of transcription through mediation of the switch from polycomb-repressed to active chromatin (4). Previous studies have shown MPP11 is overexpressed in leukemia and head and neck cancer, leading researchers to suggest MPP11 may be a potential therapeutic target (5-7). MPP11 is phosphorylated at serine 47 by S6 kinase, which regulates senescence in fibroblast cells (8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DNMT1 (D63A6) XP® Rabbit mAb #5032.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).