Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: EPAC1 (5D3) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID O95398 #4155 to ERG (A7L1G) Rabbit mAb (PE Conjugate), UniProt ID P11308 #16606

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (D4K8R) XP® Rabbit mAb #36746.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands. While EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand, EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5).The EphA1 receptor preferentially binds ephrin-A1 as a ligand (6). This ligand-receptor interaction stimulates EphA1 signaling and regulates cell morphology and motility through the ILK-RhoA-ROCK pathway (7). The EphA1 gene has been associated with late-onset Alzheimer's diseases (8,9). The role of EphA1 in cancer development falls into two opposite categories. In some type of cancer such as prostate, gastric and liver cancer, high expression of EphA1 associates with cancer metastasis and invasion (10-12). For other types of cancers, such as colon cancer and nonmelanoma skin cancer, down-regulation of the protein correlates with cancer development (13,14). The bidirectional signaling modulation of Ephrin-Ephrin receptor interaction might contribute this paradox phenomena (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands. While EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand, EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5).The EphA3 receptor preferentially binds ephrin-A5. This ligand-receptor interaction stimulates EphA3 signaling, regulates cell adhesion and migration, and induces cellular morphologic responses (6-8). EphA3 plays a critical role in callosal axon guidance (9), retinotectal mapping of neurons (10), as well as cardiac cell migration and differentiation (11). Investigators have shown that somatic mutations in functional domains of EphA3 are linked to lung cancer progression (12). In addition, EphA3 expression levels have been correlated with tumor angiogenesis and progression in gastric and colorectal carcinoma (13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands. While EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand, EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5).The EphA7 receptor preferentially binds ephrin-A5 as a ligand. This ligand-receptor interaction stimulates EphA7 signaling and induces apoptotic cell death through TNFR1 and caspase-8 pathway (6,7). EphA7 plays a critical role in organ development during neural tube closure, cortical dendritic development and spine maturation as well as urine tract insertion (8-10). Secreted EphA7 has been shown to promote somatic cell reprogramming through ERK activity reduction (11). Silencing of the secreted form of EphA7 is associated with germinal center B cell lymhomas. The secreted form of EphA7 has been proposed as a soluble tumor suppresor in lymphoma (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ephrin receptor B2 (EphB2) is an ephrin family receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in regulating growth and development of multiple tissues and organs (1,2). The EphB2 transmembrane receptor protein contains a kinase domain, a PDZ motif, and a SAM domain within a conserved cytoplasmic domain. A ligand binding domain, a cysteine-rich domain, and fibronectin type III repeats comprise the conserved EphB2 extracellular domain (3). EphB2 binds with high affinity to ephrin B ligands, and to some ephrin A proteins, to initiate bidirectional signaling between neighboring cells (1,2). Upon binding, EphB2-Ephrin B2 dimers form a heterotetramer and position the receptor-ligand complex on the cell membrane to facilitate bidirectional signal transduction (3). In addition to associating with ephrin ligands, EphB2 also regulates a number of biological processes through interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), NMDA receptor (NMDAR), the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1, and p21-activated kinase (PAK1) (4-7). While some studies support a role for EphB2 as a pro-oncogenic kinase, other research suggests that EphB2 acts as a tumor suppressor (1,2,4,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Epithelial Protein Lost in Neoplasm (EPLIN) is an actin-binding protein that regulates actin filament dynamics and cross-linking (1). Alpha and beta isoforms are generated from alternate promoters, with the EPLIN-β isoform representing the full-length protein and the EPLIN-α isoform lacking the amino-terminal 160 amino acids (2). Increased expression of EPLIN protein results in more abundant and larger actin stress fibers due to stabilizing of cross-links and inhibition of actin depolymerization. EPLIN protein inhibits Rac1-promoted membrane ruffling and Arp2/3-associated actin filament branching (1).Research studies demonstrate reduced EPLIN-α expression in tumor tissues, and correlate this reduction with increased invasiveness and poor clinical outcomes (3). The EPLIN protein is an important negative regulator of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)(4). While EMT is a critical process during normal embryonic development, dysregulation in transformed cells is a key step in the transition to metastasis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eps15 (EGFR pathway substrate 15) was originally discovered as a substrate for the kinase activity of EGFR (1). Eps15 has a tripartite structure comprising an amino terminal portion, which contains three evolutionarily conserved EH protein-protein interaction domains, a central putative coiled-coil region required for constitutive oligmerization, and a carboxy terminal domain containing multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Asp-Pro-Phe that constitute the AP2 binding domain. The carboxy terminal domain also contains two ubiquitin interaction motifs (UIMs), the last of which is indespensible for Eps15 binding to ubiquitin (1). Several lines of evidence support a role for Eps15 in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including the endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Eps15 binds to AP2 as well as other proteins involved in endocytosis and/or synaptic vesicle recycling, such as synaptojanin1 and epsin. Furthermore, Eps15 colocalizes with markers of the plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits and vesicles (2). Eps15 regulates the endosomal trafficking of c-Met (3) and EGFR (4), possibly by recruiting the ubiquitinated receptors to the rims of clathrin-coated pits through interaction between the ubiquitin tag and its UIMs.The EPS15 gene yields two isoforms that are believed to reside in distinct subcellular locations and are thus implicated in different facets of endosomal trafficking (5). Human EPS15 has been mapped to chromosome 1p31-p32, a region displaying several nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities, including deletions in neuroblastoma and translocations in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias. Research has shown two translocations t(1;11)(p32;q11) are found in rare cases of myeloid leukemia where the Eps15 gene was fused to the HRX gene, resulting in two reciprocal fusion genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8) is an adaptor protein and can be phosphorylated by several receptor tyrosine kinases including EGFR and Src (1,2). Eps8 is composed of an N-terminal PTB domain, followed by an SH3 domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Eps8 controls actin-based motility by capping the barbed end of actin and bundling actin subunits through its C-terminal effector domain (3,4). The C-terminal α hexlical structure of Eps8 interacts directly with actin to exert these capping and bundling functions (5). The actin capping activity requires the release of Eps8 autoinhibitory binding through SH3 domain interaction with an adaptor molecule, such as Abi-1 (6). This SH3 domain of Eps8 also binds to RN-tre to regulate the down stream Rab5-mediated endocytosis pathway (6). Eps8 functions by binding several receptor tyrosine kinases, such as EGFR or FGFR, to enhance receptor mediated mitogenic Rac signaling and Rab5 endocytosis (6,7). The effector region of Eps8 is necessary for this process. By association with Abi-1 and forming the Eps8/Abi-1/Sos-1 complex, Eps8 couples initial growth factor stimulation to actin motility and the Rac activation pathway (8,9). Eps8 has been shown to be important in the cellular function of filopodial protrusions, cell migration, microvilli formation, and focal adhesion (10-13). Research studies have demonstrated that through its involvement in actin related cellular functions, Eps8 plays a role in cancer cell growth, survival, motility, and invasiveness (14-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epiregulin (EREG) belongs to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family and is a ligand for the EGF receptor (EGFR) and ErbB4 (1-3). The binding of EREG to homodimers, as well as heterodimers containing EGFR or ErbB4, leads to receptor activation and downstream signaling to promote cell growth and proliferation (4-6). In normal human tissue, moderate levels of EREG are expressed in the placenta and peripheral blood macrophages. Research studies have shown that EREG is expressed at high levels in numerous cancer cell lines, and EREG expression is correlated with primary cancer aggresiveness/metastases (7-11). In addition to its involvement in tumorigenesis, a variant of EREG has also been shown to be associated with tuberculosis susceptibility (12). EREG is synthesized as a ~30 kDa glycosylated membrane bound proepiregulin form (19 kDa when not glycosylated) and through subsequent proteolytic cleavage is processed to a 17 kDa C-terminal propeptide, and the 6kDa mature form of epiregulin (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ERG (A7L1G) Rabbit mAb #97249.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: ETS-related gene (ERG) is a member of the E-26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (1). ERG plays important and highly conserved roles in vertebrate development. Early in embryonic development, ERG is highly expressed in the embryonic mesoderm and endothelium, where it plays a critical role in the formation of the vascular system, urogenital tract and bone development (2,3). Later in embryonic development, ERG functions to regulate the pluripotency of hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial cell homeostasis and angiogenesis (2,4-7). ERG expression is not restricted to development. In adult mouse, ERG is normally expressed in endothelial tissues, including adrenal, cartilage, heart, spleen, lymphatic endothelial and eosinophil cells (8). However, deregulation of ERG activity, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, has been implicated and linked to poor prognosis in a number of different cancers. Chromosomal translocations generating EWS/ERG chimeric proteins comprised of the amino-terminal transactivation domain of Ewing’s sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWS) and the carboxy-terminal ETS domain of ERG have been identified in 5-10% of Ewing’s sarcoma, an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor (9). Chromosomal translocations between ERG and TLS/FUS or ERG and ELF4 have been implicated in acute myeloid leukemia (10, 11). Over-expression of ERG, resulting from gene fusion with the androgen-driven promoter of the TMPRSS2 gene, has been identified as a key driver of metastasis and marker for poor prognosis in prostate cancer (12).