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Product listing: F4/80 (BM8.1) Rat mAb, UniProt ID Q61549 #71299 to Fascin (D1A8) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q16658 #9269

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$229
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$349
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$189
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$189
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$329
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$329
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$329
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to redFluor™ 710 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$329
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to violetFluor™ 450 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Endogenous cannabinoids have been implicated in addictive behaviors and drug abuse (1). Fatty-acid amide hydrolase 1 (FAAH1) is a plasma membrane-bound hydrolase that converts oleamide to oleic acid (2). This hydrolase also converts the cannabinoid anandamide, the endogenous ligand for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, to arachidonic acid, suggesting a role in fatty-acid amide inactivation (2). Mice lacking FAAH1 have significantly higher levels of anandamide in the brain and show decreased sensitivity to pain, further indicating a role for FAAH1 in the regulation of endocannabinoid signaling in vivo (3). FAAH1 null mice also demonstrate an increased preference for alcohol and an increased voluntary uptake of alcohol as compared to wild-type mice, indicating a role of FAAH1 in modulating addictive behaviors (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Endogenous cannabinoids have been implicated in addictive behaviors and drug abuse (1). Fatty-acid amide hydrolase 1 (FAAH1) is a plasma membrane-bound hydrolase that converts oleamide to oleic acid (2). This hydrolase also converts the cannabinoid anandamide, the endogenous ligand for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, to arachidonic acid, suggesting a role in fatty-acid amide inactivation (2). Mice lacking FAAH1 have significantly higher levels of anandamide in the brain and show decreased sensitivity to pain, further indicating a role for FAAH1 in the regulation of endocannabinoid signaling in vivo (3). FAAH1 null mice also demonstrate an increased preference for alcohol and an increased voluntary uptake of alcohol as compared to wild-type mice, indicating a role of FAAH1 in modulating addictive behaviors (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1,2). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (2). Research studies have shown that common variants of the human liver fatty acid binding protein gene FABP1 play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are cytoplasmic lipid chaperones that bind fatty acids and lipids for transport to various cellular components (1,2). Research studies demonstrate differential FABP expression in several types of tumors and their normal-cell counterparts (3). Fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) is predominantly expressed in heart, skeletal muscle, brain, and mammary gland (4). FABP3 may play a role in supplying energy to the heart and other tissues (5). The release of FABP3 from the heart upon infarction is used as a serum marker for myocardial stress and cardiotoxicity (6). Additional studies suggest that FABP3 is a potential tumor suppressor in breast cancer (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (2). The predominant fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes is FABP4, also called adipocyte fatty acid binding protein or aP2. FABP4 is also expressed in macrophages (3). FABP4 knockout mice fed a high-fat and high-calorie diet become obese but develop neither insulin resistance nor diabetes, suggesting that this protein might be a link between obesity and insulin resistance and diabetes (4). Mice deficient in both FABP4 and ApoE show protection against atherosclerosis when compared with mice deficient only in ApoE (3). Mice carrying a FABP4 genetic variant exhibit both reduced FABP4 expression and a reduced potential for developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. A related study in humans indicated a similar pattern, suggesting that FABP4 may be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (1). They are critical mediators of metabolic processes, and are increasingly being understood to play key roles in disease (2). FABP5 is known as the epidermal fatty acid binding protein as it was originally identified in studies on psoriasis (3) where it was shown to play a role a role in keratinocyte differentiation (4). It has since been found to play diverse roles in other normal physiological processes as well as in disease states (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind to fatty acids and other lipids to function as cytoplasmic lipid chaperones (1). They participate in the transport of fatty acids and other lipids to various cellular pathways (2). Differential expression of FABPs is found in several types of tumors and their normal-cell counterparts (3). FABP7 is abundantly expressed in fetal brain and may be essential for development (4). Expression is required for the establishment of the radial glial fiber system, a system that is necessary for the development of cortical layers (5). Increased expression of FABP7 is associated with reduced survival in patients with glioblastoma (6), and is also found in glial cells following nerve injury (7). Investigators have found loss of FABP7 may be involved in the development and progression of breast cancer and expression of FABP7 has been shown to induce mammary differentiation and to inhibit growth of breast cancer cells (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: FAM3C, also known as ILEI (interleukin-like epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition [EMT] inducer), is a cytokine-like protein and member of the FAM3 family. FAM3C plays an important role in EMT and metastasis during cancer progression in human and mouse cells, and is highly expressed in human cancer (1,2). In colorectal cancer, researchers have indicated that FAM3C is a marker for EMT and tumor progression, and that high expression of FAM3C is predictive of poor prognosis (3). While EMT induction by FAM3C can be independent of TGF-beta, research studies have also shown TGF-beta-dependent regulation of FAM3C expression at the translational level in mouse and human cells (4,5).FAM3C has also been linked to regulation of osteoblast differentiation (6), and to accumulation of amyloid beta plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (7). FAM3C exists in monomeric and in homodimeric form, and research shows that FAM3C homodimers contain its EMT-inducing and tumor promoting activity (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters (ISC) are cofactors for many proteins that display a wide range of biological functions, such as DNA maintenance, transcription, translation, cellular metabolism, electron transport, and oxidative phosphorylation (1). While structurally simple, the synthesis and insertion of ISC into Fe-S proteins are complex processes that involve many different proteins (2). FAM96B, also known as MIP18 (MSS19-interacting protein of 18kDa), is a component of the cytosolic Fe-S protein assembly complex (3,4). FAM96B is in a complex with MMS19 that is responsible for assembly of multiple nuclear Fe-S proteins involved in DNA metabolism (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that results in chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). The ubiquitously expressed FA complementation group A protein (FANCA, FAA) is a component of the FA nuclear complex that also contains FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCL, and FANCM. In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2 and FANCN/PALB2 are then recruited to sites of DNA damage along with other DNA repair proteins. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).DNA-damage-dependent localization and stability of FANCA protein regulates FA complex function and localization. Interaction between FANCA protein and the Hsp90 chaperone protein regulates FANCA protein stability and turnover, and may play a role in controlling the FA DNA damage pathway (4). Mutations in the corresponding FANCA gene are responsible for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in symptoms that include chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). FANCB is an X-linked member of the Fanconi Anemia nuclear complex (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCM). In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2 and FANCN/PALB2 are then recruited to sites of DNA damage along with other DNA repair proteins. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).Studies of FANCB knockout embryonic stem cells suggest a role for FANCB in the formation of Rad51 and FANCD2 foci at chromosomal sites of DNA damage (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in symptoms that include chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCM) induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2).Monoubiquitination of FANCD2 induces localization of FANCD2 to sites of DNA damage, where it interacts with BRCA1 (4). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2, and FANCN/PALB2 are also recruited to sites of DNA damage. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Association of the receptor Fas with its ligand FasL triggers an apoptotic pathway that plays an important role in immune regulation, development, and progression of cancers (1,2). Loss of function mutation in either Fas (lpr mice) or FasL (gld mice) leads to lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly as a result of decreased apoptosis in CD4-CD8- T lymphocytes (3,4). FasL (CD95L, Apo-1L) is a type II transmembrane protein of 280 amino acids (runs at approximately 40 kDa upon glycosylation) that belongs to the TNF family, which also includes TNF-α, TRAIL, and TWEAK. Binding of FasL to its receptor triggers the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) involving the recruitment of the adaptor protein FADD and caspase-8 (5). Activation of caspase-8 from this complex initiates a caspase cascade resulting in the activation of caspase-3 and subsequent cleavage of proteins leading to apoptosis. Unlike Fas, which is constitutively expressed by various cell types, FasL is predominantly expressed on activated T lymphocytes, NK cells, and at immune privileged sites (6). FasL is also expressed in several tumor types as a mechanism to evade immune surveillance (7). Similar to other members of the TNF family, FasL can be cleaved by metalloproteinases producing a 26 kDa trimeric soluble form (8,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Association of the receptor Fas with its ligand FasL triggers an apoptotic pathway that plays an important role in immune regulation, development, and progression of cancers (1,2). Loss of function mutation in either Fas (lpr mice) or FasL (gld mice) leads to lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly as a result of decreased apoptosis in CD4-CD8- T lymphocytes (3,4). FasL (CD95L, Apo-1L) is a type II transmembrane protein of 280 amino acids (runs at approximately 40 kDa upon glycosylation) that belongs to the TNF family, which also includes TNF-α, TRAIL, and TWEAK. Binding of FasL to its receptor triggers the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) involving the recruitment of the adaptor protein FADD and caspase-8 (5). Activation of caspase-8 from this complex initiates a caspase cascade resulting in the activation of caspase-3 and subsequent cleavage of proteins leading to apoptosis. Unlike Fas, which is constitutively expressed by various cell types, FasL is predominantly expressed on activated T lymphocytes, NK cells, and at immune privileged sites (6). FasL is also expressed in several tumor types as a mechanism to evade immune surveillance (7). Similar to other members of the TNF family, FasL can be cleaved by metalloproteinases producing a 26 kDa trimeric soluble form (8,9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Fascin is a monomeric, globular protein that plays a central role in regulating the structure and function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (1). Fascin promotes cross-linkage of parallel actin filaments during the formation of cell protrusions (lamellipodia and filopodia), and therefore plays an important role in regulating cell migration (2). It has been reported that fascin may also regulate filopodia formation by a mechanism independent of its actin-bundling functions (3), though less is known about this mechanism of action. Research studies have shown that increased fascin expression is associated with increased motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, including breast, colon, prostate, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (4-6). Fascin binds to the armadillo-repeat domain of β-catenin in vitro and in vivo, and has been shown to co-localize with β-catenin and cadherins at the leading edge of migratory cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fascin is a monomeric, globular protein that plays a central role in regulating the structure and function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (1). Fascin promotes cross-linkage of parallel actin filaments during the formation of cell protrusions (lamellipodia and filopodia), and therefore plays an important role in regulating cell migration (2). It has been reported that fascin may also regulate filopodia formation by a mechanism independent of its actin-bundling functions (3), though less is known about this mechanism of action. Research studies have shown that increased fascin expression is associated with increased motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, including breast, colon, prostate, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (4-6). Fascin binds to the armadillo-repeat domain of β-catenin in vitro and in vivo, and has been shown to co-localize with β-catenin and cadherins at the leading edge of migratory cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fascin is a monomeric, globular protein that plays a central role in regulating the structure and function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (1). Fascin promotes cross-linkage of parallel actin filaments during the formation of cell protrusions (lamellipodia and filopodia), and therefore plays an important role in regulating cell migration (2). It has been reported that fascin may also regulate filopodia formation by a mechanism independent of its actin-bundling functions (3), though less is known about this mechanism of action. Research studies have shown that increased fascin expression is associated with increased motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, including breast, colon, prostate, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (4-6). Fascin binds to the armadillo-repeat domain of β-catenin in vitro and in vivo, and has been shown to co-localize with β-catenin and cadherins at the leading edge of migratory cells (7).