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Product listing: Myelin Basic Protein (D8X4Q) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P02686 #78896 to Na,K-ATPase β1 (D8W8J) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P05026 #62849

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an abundant central nervous system (CNS) myelin membrane protein that plays an important role in nerve myelination. Myelin sheaths are multi-layered membranes derived from oligodendrocytes that increase the conduction velocity of axonal impulses. MBP helps to adhere the cytoplasmic leaflets of adjacent oligodendrocyte membranes to one another. Several splice variants of MBP are expressed in cells and the protein is modified following translation (i.e. phosphorylation, methylation), which suggests additional membrane adhesion functions (1).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidase enzyme that is part of the host defense system of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (reviewed in 1). The gene for MPO was cloned independently from several laboratories (2-5). A decrease in MPO expression was noticed upon differentiation of HL-60 cells (5). MPO catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide and chloride (or other halides) to produce hypochlorous acid and other potent antimicrobial oxidants. Knockout mice of MPO are impaired in clearing select microbial infections (6). Processing of mature MPO from an initial 80-90 kDa translation product involves insertion of a heme moiety, glycosylation, and proteolytic cleavage. The mature protein is a tetramer of two heavy chains (60 kDa) and two light chains (12 kDa). It is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and monocytes and secreted during their activation. Heightened MPO levels have been associated with tissue damage and a number of pathological conditions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Base excision repair (BER) proteins catalyze the removal of incorrect or damaged bases, including oxidized bases, from DNA. N-glycosylases specific to a given lesion remove the incorrect base as the first step in BER. MYH is the mammalian ortholog of E. coli MutY, a DNA glycosylase that catalyzes the removal of 8-oxoG:A mismatches (1). Several MYH isoforms have been detected in human cells localizing to either the nucleus or the mitochondria (2). MYH interacts with DNA repair proteins and localizes to DNA damage foci after oxidative damage (3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the corresponding MYH gene are associated with human gastric (4) and colorectal (5-7) cancers.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Myoblast determination protein 1 (MyoD1), also called myogenic factor 3 (Myf3), is a member of the MyoD family of muscle specific bHLH transcription factors (1). This family is responsible for controlling specification of the muscle cell lineage and members are expressed only in skeletal muscle and its precursors. MyoD1 is considered a master regulator of skeletal myogenesis as its expression can induce myogenic differentiation in myoblasts, fibroblasts, and a variety of other cell types (2,3). Through ChIP-sequencing experiments, researchers have discovered that MyoD is associated with the promoters of many genes in muscle cells, but it only regulates a subset of those genes. These research studies point to regulation of MyoD transcriptional activity via epigenetic mechanisms involving SWI/SNF complexes and Polycomb and Trithorax Group proteins (4-6). Additional influences on muscle development include signal transduction through MAPK, PI3K/Akt, myostatin, NF-κB, and mTOR signaling pathways (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Myoglobin (MB) is an oxygen-binding protein that contains one polypeptide chain and one heme group. It is expressed in vertebrate skeletal and cardiac muscles where it plays an essential role in the storage and transport of oxygen to mitochondria. Reversible oxygen binding occurs by a linkage with the imidazole nitrogen of the 91st histidine residue in the myoglobin chain. Research studies indicate that the blockade of myoglobin in isolated cardiac myocytes mimics hypoxia when electrically stimulated for paced contractions (1). During fetal development, myoglobin is required to support cardiac function (2). Diving mammals are known to have high concentrations of myoglobin in their blood, which may contribute to their ability to endure long periods of oxygen deprivation during deep dives (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms depending on its distribution. In smooth muscle, MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). This phosphorylation is correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). ROCK also phosphorylates Ser19 of smooth muscle MLC2, which regulates the assembly of stress fibers (3). Phosphorylation of smooth muscle MLC2 at Ser1/Ser2 and Ser9 by PKC and cdc2 has been reported to inhibit myosin ATPase activity (4,5). Phosphorylation by cdc2 controls the timing of cytokinesis (5). Transgenic mice lacking phosphorylation sites on the cardiac muscle isoform show morphological and functional abnormalities (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms with varying tissue distribution. Smooth muscle MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). These phosphorylation events are correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). Striated muscle contraction is regulated by the troponin-tropomyosin complex in thin actin filaments and by binding of Ca2+ to troponin C (3). Two types of myosin light chain are expressed in the heart, with myosin light chain 2v (MYL2, MLC-2v) expression restricted to the ventricles and myosin light chain 2a (MYL7, MLC-2a) found specific to the atria. Mutations in the corresponding MYL2 gene are found in patients diagnosed with a form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterized by thickening of the mid-left ventricle.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The myosin family of motor proteins drive ATP-dependent actin-based motility in eukaryotic cells and contain a conserved amino-terminal motor domain (reviewed in 1,2).Myosin VI is an unconventional minus-end-directed myosin involved in the transport of vesicles and organelles within the cell, endocytosis, and organelle biogenesis (3-6). The movement of myosin VI and its cargo along actin filaments is unique among myosin family members in its mechanism; its tail domain structure allows it to take larger than predicted steps along the actin filament (reviewed in 1,7).Myosin VI has been shown to regulate the polarized delivery of proteins to specialized subcellular locations, including the delivery of EGFR to the leading edge of migrating cells (8), as well as the delivery of specialized axonal proteins in neurons (9). Myosin VI has also been shown to mediate activity of the tumor suppressor p53 during DNA damage (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cell functions. Substrate specificity is determined by the binding of a regulatory subunit to the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). It is estimated that over fifty different regulatory subunits exist (1).The myosin phosphatase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: PP1c, a targeting/regulatory subunit (MYPT/myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), and a 20 kDa subunit of unknown function (M20). MYPT binding to PP1cδ alters the conformation of the catalytic cleft and increases enzyme activity and specificity (2). Two MYPT isoforms that are 61% identical have been described. MYPT1 is widely expressed, while MYPT2 expression appears to be exclusive to heart and brain (3). Related family members include MBS85, MYPT3, and TIMAP (4).Myosin phosphatase regulates the interaction of actin and myosin in response to signaling through the small GTPase Rho. Rho activity inhibits myosin phosphatase via Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853 results in phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MYST1, also known as mammalian male absent on the first (MOF) and lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (1,2). As the catalytic subunit of two different histone acetyltransferase complexes, MSL and NSL, MYST1 is responsible for the majority of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation in the cell. MYST1 also acetylates p53 on lysine 120 and is important for activation of pro-apoptotic genes (1,2). As a component of the MSL complex, MYST1 associates with MSL1, MSL2L1, and MSL3L1, and specifically acetylates histone H4 on lysine 16 (3-5). As part of the NSL complex, MYST1 associates with the MLL1 histone methyltransferase complex containing MLL1/KMT2A, ASH2L, HCFC1, WDR5 and RBBP5, and shows broader acetyltransferase activity for histone H4 on lysines 5, 8, and 16 (3-5). MYST1 plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription, DNA repair, autophagy, apoptosis, and emybryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation (1,2,6). Loss of MYST1 leads to a global reduction in histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation, a common hallmark found in many human cancers. A reduction of MYST1 protein levels and histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation is associated with poor prognosis in breast, renal, colorectal, gastric, and ovarian cancers (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MYST2, also known as HBO1 and lysine acetyltransferase 7 (KAT7), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). MYST2 is the catalytic subunit of the HBO1 acetyltransferase complex, which consists of MYST2, MYST/ESA1-asociated factor 6 (MEAF6), inhibitor of growth protein 4 (ING4) or inhibitor of growth protein 5 (ING5), and one of two families of scaffold proteins (JADE-1/2/3 or BRPF1/2/3) (1,2). The substrate specificity of the HBO1 complex is determined by the associated scaffold protein. HBO1 complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins acetylate histone H4 on lysines 5, 8 and 12, while complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins acetylate histone H3 on lysines 14 and 23 (2). In addition the scaffold protein appears to regulate the function of the HBO1 complex. Complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins bind to origin recognition complex 1 (ORC1) and regulate licensing of DNA replication, while HBO1 complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins regulate transcription (2-5). MYST2 is required for regulation of cell proliferation (1), adipogenesis (6), embryonic development (7) and survival of fetal liver erythroblasts (8). In addition, MYST2 is over-expressed in several human cancers, including cancers of the testis, ovary, breast, stomach, esophagus, and bladder (9). The MYST2 gene is amplified and protein is over-expressed in breast cancers, and over-expression of MYST2 increases anchorage-independent growth of several breast cancer cell lines (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated N-Cadherin (D4R1H) XP® Rabbit mAb #13116.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated N-Cadherin (D4R1H) XP® Rabbit mAb #13116.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASPs) mediate actin dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex in response to activated Rho family GTPases. In mammals, five WASP family members have been described. Hematopoietic WASP and ubiquitously expressed N-WASP are autoinhibited in unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation they are activated by cdc42, which relieves the autoinhibition in conjunction with phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Three WAVE (Wasf, SCAR) family proteins are similar in sequence to WASP and N-WASP but lack the WASP/N-WASP autoinhibition domains and are indirectly activated by Rac (reviewed in 1). Both WASP and WAVE functions appear to be essential, as knockout of either N-WASP or Scar-2 in mice results in cardiac and neuronal defects and embryonic lethality (2,3). Loss of WASP results in immune system defects and fewer immune cells (4). WAVE-2 (WASF2) is widely distributed, while WAVE-1 and WAVE-3 are strongly expressed in brain (5). WAVE-3 may act as a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma, a childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system (6). Increased expression of WAVE-3 is seen in breast cancer, and studies in breast adenocarcinoma cells indicate that WAVE-3 regulates breast cancer progression, invasion and metastasis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (7,8).

$260
100 µl

Background: N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is a post-transcriptional modification found in various RNA subtypes. While the presence of m6A in RNA was described decades ago, the lack of tools has made interrogating the epitranscriptomic landscape challenging (1,2). With the emergence of new technologies such as miCLIP and NG-RNA-seq, researchers have been able to show that m6A is a biologically relevant mark in mRNA that is enriched in 3’ UTRs and stop codons (3,4). The m6A writer complex consists of a core heterodimer of methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14), and the additional regulatory proteins Virlizer/VIRMA and Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) (5). METTL3 is the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 is the target recognition subunit that binds to RNA (6). The Virilzer/VIRMA protein directs m6A methylation to the 3’ UTRs and stop codons, and WTAP targets the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (7). Less is known about readers and erasers of m6A, and while the fat mass and obesity-associated protein FTO was the first discovered m6A demethylase, subsequent studies demonstrated that this enzyme may prefer the closely related m6Am mark in vivo (8,9). ALKBH5 was later shown to be a bona fide m6A demethylase enzyme, contributing to the idea that the m6A modification is dynamically regulated (10). Readers of the m6A mark include the YTH protein family, which can bind to m6A and influence mRNA stability and translation efficiency (3,11-13). The m6A mark and machinery have been shown to regulate a variety of cellular functions, including RNA splicing, translational control, pluripotency and cell fate determination, neuronal function, and disease (1, 14-17). The m6A writer complex has been linked to various cancer types including AML and endometrial cancers (18,19). Additionally, m6A has been implicated in resistance to chemotherapy (20).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Na,K-ATPase α1 (D4Y7E) Rabbit mAb #23565.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).