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Product listing: RIP (D94C12) XP® Rabbit mAb (PE Conjugate), UniProt ID Q13546 #14577 to Rpb1 NTD (D8L4Y) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P24928 #14958

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP (D94C12) XP® Rabbit mAb #3493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor Interacting Protein 2 (RIP2) is a serine/threonine kinase with a carboxy-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD). Association of RIP2 with the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) causes activation of NF-κB and induction of apoptosis (1-3). Expression of RIP2 is induced in macrophages upon exposure to bacterial cell wall components, such as LPS. RIP2-deficient mouse models demonstrate that this kinase integrates and transduces signals for both the innate and adaptive immune system (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and CellSimple™ cell-assay analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP3 (D4G2A) Rabbit mAb #95702.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) family that associates with Raf-1 and the MEK and MAP kinases (1). RKIP has been shown to form a complex with Raf-1, MEK, and Erk (2). Although MEK and Erk can simultaneously bind RKIP, the association between Raf-1 and RKIP and that of RKIP and MEK are mutually exclusive. Thus, RKIP competitively disrupts the Raf-1-MEK complex and effectively terminates signal transmission from Raf-1 to MAP kinases (2). The inhibitory effect of RKIP on MAP kinase signaling is eliminated by PKC phosphorylation of RKIP at Ser153 (3). PKC phosphorylation on Ser153 also promotes the association of RKIP with GRK2, which prevents GRK2-dependent internalization of GPCR (4). RKIP also interacts with modules of the NF-κB pathway, including NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), TAK1, IKKα and IKKβ (5). These interactions antagonize cytokine-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway (5). Restoration of RKIP expression is associated with the inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis, implying that RKIP may be a potential clinical target as a suppressor of tumor metastasis through inhibition of vascular invasion (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RNase L is an antiviral protein that is expressed in most mammalian cells (1). Latent RNase L in the cytoplasm is activated by the second messenger 2’,5’-linked oligoadenylate (2-5A), which is produced by oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) after it binds viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) (2, 3). RNase L forms a crossed homodimer that is stabilized by kinase homology and ankyrin domains, which position two kinase extension nuclease domains for RNA recognition (4). RNase L then degrades both viral and cellular RNA (5). In mouse models, RNase L has been shown to produce small self-RNAs that act to amplify innate antiviral immunity through IFN-β induction (6). Research has also shown that RNase L forms a complex with Filamin A that acts as a barrier to restrict virus entry, and that RNase L can induce autophagy in response to viral infection (7, 8). Finally, research suggests RNase L may contribute to type I diabetes onset through immune response regulation (9).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROBO2 is a member of the roundabout (ROBO) receptor family (1). The activation of ROBO2 by SLIT ligand regulates various biological processes, including promoting stem cell senescence via WNT inhibition, destabilizing podocyte actin polymerization and adhesion, and activation of Ena/VASP to facilitate tumor cell extrusion from epithelia (2-5). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance and synapse function, retinal neurovascular formation, and muscle patterning (6-9). Loss of function mutations of ROBO2 have been associated with urinary tract anomalies and vesicoureteral reflux (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ron is a member of the Met protooncogene family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which also includes Stk, c-Met, and c-Sea. The functional Ron is a heterodimer composed of a 40 kDa α chain and a 150 kDa β chain. Ron is initially synthesized in the cells as a single-chain, pro-Ron precursor that is cleaved into the two active chains. The α chain is completely extracellular, whereas the β chain traverses the cell membrane and contains the intracellular tyrosine kinase and regulatory elements (1,2). Ron mediates multiple signaling cascades that involve cell motility, adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis. The signaling pathways activated downstream of Ron include the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathways. Ron activation can also significantly increase c-Src activity, a signaling intermediate involved in cell cycle progression, motility, angiogenesis and survival (3,4). The function of Ron has been shown to be important for embryological development as well as implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumors (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ron is a member of the Met protooncogene family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which also includes Stk, c-Met, and c-Sea. The functional Ron is a heterodimer composed of a 40 kDa α chain and a 150 kDa β chain. Ron is initially synthesized in the cells as a single-chain, pro-Ron precursor that is cleaved into the two active chains. The α chain is completely extracellular, whereas the β chain traverses the cell membrane and contains the intracellular tyrosine kinase and regulatory elements (1,2). Ron mediates multiple signaling cascades that involve cell motility, adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis. The signaling pathways activated downstream of Ron include the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathways. Ron activation can also significantly increase c-Src activity, a signaling intermediate involved in cell cycle progression, motility, angiogenesis and survival (3,4). The function of Ron has been shown to be important for embryological development as well as implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumors (5).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ron (C81H9) Rabbit mAb #2654.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ron is a member of the Met protooncogene family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which also includes Stk, c-Met, and c-Sea. The functional Ron is a heterodimer composed of a 40 kDa α chain and a 150 kDa β chain. Ron is initially synthesized in the cells as a single-chain, pro-Ron precursor that is cleaved into the two active chains. The α chain is completely extracellular, whereas the β chain traverses the cell membrane and contains the intracellular tyrosine kinase and regulatory elements (1,2). Ron mediates multiple signaling cascades that involve cell motility, adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis. The signaling pathways activated downstream of Ron include the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathways. Ron activation can also significantly increase c-Src activity, a signaling intermediate involved in cell cycle progression, motility, angiogenesis and survival (3,4). The function of Ron has been shown to be important for embryological development as well as implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumors (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROR1 and ROR2 are orphan receptor tyrosine kinases that are most closely related to MuSK and the Trk family of neurotrophin receptors. They are characterized by the presence of extracellular frizzled-like cysteine-rich domains and membrane-proximal kringle domains, both of which are assumed to mediate protein-protein interactions (1-3). The ROR family RTKs are evolutionarily conserved among Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, mice, and humans (1,4). Although the functions of ROR kinases are unknown, similarities between ROR and MuSK and Trk kinases have led to speculation that ROR kinases regulate synaptic development. CAM-1, a C. elegans ortholog of the ROR family RTKs, plays several important roles in regulating cellular migration, polarity of asymmetric cell divisions, and axonal outgrowth of neurons during nematode development (4). mROR1 and mROR2 may play differential roles during the development of the nervous system (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROR1 and ROR2 are orphan receptor tyrosine kinases that are most closely related to MuSK and the Trk family of neurotrophin receptors. They are characterized by the presence of extracellular frizzled-like cysteine-rich domains and membrane-proximal kringle domains, both of which are assumed to mediate protein-protein interactions (1-3). The ROR family RTKs are evolutionarily conserved among Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, mice, and humans (1,4). Although the functions of ROR kinases are unknown, similarities between ROR and MuSK and Trk kinases have led to speculation that ROR kinases regulate synaptic development. CAM-1, a C. elegans ortholog of the ROR family RTKs, plays several important roles in regulating cellular migration, polarity of asymmetric cell divisions, and axonal outgrowth of neurons during nematode development (4). mROR1 and mROR2 may play differential roles during the development of the nervous system (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROS1, an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, was initially identified as a homolog of v-ros from the UR2 sarcoma virus (1). ROS1 consists of a large extracellular domain that is composed of six fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. While the function of ROS1 is undefined, it has been shown to play an important role in differentiation of epididymal epithelium (2). The first oncogenic fusion of ROS1, FIG-ROS1, was initially identified by research studies in glioblastoma (3), and subsequent studies have found this fusion in cholangiocarcinoma (4), ovarian cancer (5) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (6). Investigators have found additional oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins in NSCLC (at a frequency of ~1.6%), where the ROS1 kinase domain is fused to the amino-terminal region of a number of different proteins, including CD74 and SLC34A2 (6-8). ROS1 fusion proteins activate the SHP-2 phosphatase, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Erk, and Stat3 pathways (3,4,9).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ROS1 (D4D6®) Rabbit mAb #3287.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ROS1, an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, was initially identified as a homolog of v-ros from the UR2 sarcoma virus (1). ROS1 consists of a large extracellular domain that is composed of six fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. While the function of ROS1 is undefined, it has been shown to play an important role in differentiation of epididymal epithelium (2). The first oncogenic fusion of ROS1, FIG-ROS1, was initially identified by research studies in glioblastoma (3), and subsequent studies have found this fusion in cholangiocarcinoma (4), ovarian cancer (5) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (6). Investigators have found additional oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins in NSCLC (at a frequency of ~1.6%), where the ROS1 kinase domain is fused to the amino-terminal region of a number of different proteins, including CD74 and SLC34A2 (6-8). ROS1 fusion proteins activate the SHP-2 phosphatase, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Erk, and Stat3 pathways (3,4,9).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody ROS1 (D4D6®) Rabbit mAb #3287.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ROS1, an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, was initially identified as a homolog of v-ros from the UR2 sarcoma virus (1). ROS1 consists of a large extracellular domain that is composed of six fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. While the function of ROS1 is undefined, it has been shown to play an important role in differentiation of epididymal epithelium (2). The first oncogenic fusion of ROS1, FIG-ROS1, was initially identified by research studies in glioblastoma (3), and subsequent studies have found this fusion in cholangiocarcinoma (4), ovarian cancer (5) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (6). Investigators have found additional oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins in NSCLC (at a frequency of ~1.6%), where the ROS1 kinase domain is fused to the amino-terminal region of a number of different proteins, including CD74 and SLC34A2 (6-8). ROS1 fusion proteins activate the SHP-2 phosphatase, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Erk, and Stat3 pathways (3,4,9).

$145
20 µl
$426
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROS1, an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, was initially identified as a homolog of v-ros from the UR2 sarcoma virus (1). ROS1 consists of a large extracellular domain that is composed of six fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. While the function of ROS1 is undefined, it has been shown to play an important role in differentiation of epididymal epithelium (2). The first oncogenic fusion of ROS1, FIG-ROS1, was initially identified by research studies in glioblastoma (3), and subsequent studies have found this fusion in cholangiocarcinoma (4), ovarian cancer (5) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (6). Investigators have found additional oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins in NSCLC (at a frequency of ~1.6%), where the ROS1 kinase domain is fused to the amino-terminal region of a number of different proteins, including CD74 and SLC34A2 (6-8). ROS1 fusion proteins activate the SHP-2 phosphatase, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Erk, and Stat3 pathways (3,4,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).