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Product listing: RhoE (4) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P61587 #3664 to ROCK2 (D1B1) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O75116 #9029

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases act as molecular switches that regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Typically, they are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and are inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP (1). Rnd1, Rnd2 and RhoE/Rnd3 comprise the evolutionarily divergent Rnd family of Rho-type small GTPases, which lack GTPase activity and therefore remain in a GTP-bound state (2, reviewed in 3). RhoE/Rnd3 activity leads to a decrease in stress fibers and increased cell migration, at least in part through regulation of the Rho-dependent kinase ROCK1 (4). Activity of RhoE/Rnd3 itself is regulated by ROCK1, which phosphorylates RhoE/Rnd3 at Ser11, enhancing its activity (5). RhoE/Rnd3 has been implicated in inhibition of DNA-damage induced apoptosis (6) and cell cycle arrest (7). In keratinocytes, RhoE/Rnd3 regulates differentiation through its effects on both proliferation and adhesion (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) is a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation (1,2). It was shown that RPL26 increases the translation of p53 mRNA by binding to its 5' untranslated region (UTR) after DNA damage. Studies found that overexpression of RPL26 enhances the binding of p53 mRNA to the ribosomes and increases p53 translation. Overexpression of RPL26 also induces cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase and increases radiation-stimulated apoptosis (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation. HSP90 interacts with both the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of rpS3, preventing its ubiquitination and degradation and thereby retaining the integrity of the ribosome (1). rpS3 has also been shown to function as an endonuclease during DNA damage repair (2,3). Furthermore, overexpression of rpS3 sensitizes lymphocytic cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis, indicating a third role for rpS3 during apoptosis (4). The functions of rpS3 during DNA damage repair and apoptosis have been mapped to two distinct domains (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cell growth is a fundamental biological process whereby cells accumulate mass and increase in size. The mammalian TOR (mTOR) pathway regulates growth by coordinating energy and nutrient signals with growth factor-derived signals (1). mTOR is a large protein kinase with two different complexes. One complex contains mTOR, GβL and raptor, which is a target of rapamycin. The other complex, insensitive to rapamycin, includes mTOR, GβL, Sin1, and rictor (1). The mTOR-rictor complex phosphorylates Ser473 of Akt/PKB in vitro (2). This phosphorylation is essential for full Akt/PKB activation. Furthermore, an siRNA knockdown of rictor inhibits Ser473 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (3). This complex has also been shown to phosphorylate the rapamycin-resistant mutants of S6K1, another effector of mTOR (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cell growth is a fundamental biological process whereby cells accumulate mass and increase in size. The mammalian TOR (mTOR) pathway regulates growth by coordinating energy and nutrient signals with growth factor-derived signals (1). mTOR is a large protein kinase with two different complexes. One complex contains mTOR, GβL and raptor, which is a target of rapamycin. The other complex, insensitive to rapamycin, includes mTOR, GβL, Sin1, and rictor (1). The mTOR-rictor complex phosphorylates Ser473 of Akt/PKB in vitro (2). This phosphorylation is essential for full Akt/PKB activation. Furthermore, an siRNA knockdown of rictor inhibits Ser473 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (3). This complex has also been shown to phosphorylate the rapamycin-resistant mutants of S6K1, another effector of mTOR (4).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated sepharose beads. Rictor (D16H9) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Rictor (D16H9) Rabbit mAb #9476.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Cell growth is a fundamental biological process whereby cells accumulate mass and increase in size. The mammalian TOR (mTOR) pathway regulates growth by coordinating energy and nutrient signals with growth factor-derived signals (1). mTOR is a large protein kinase with two different complexes. One complex contains mTOR, GβL and raptor, which is a target of rapamycin. The other complex, insensitive to rapamycin, includes mTOR, GβL, Sin1, and rictor (1). The mTOR-rictor complex phosphorylates Ser473 of Akt/PKB in vitro (2). This phosphorylation is essential for full Akt/PKB activation. Furthermore, an siRNA knockdown of rictor inhibits Ser473 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (3). This complex has also been shown to phosphorylate the rapamycin-resistant mutants of S6K1, another effector of mTOR (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Rap1 interacting factor 1 (RIF1) was originally identified as a regulator of telomere homeostasis in yeast and mammalian cells (1). Research studies show that RIF1 regulates the timing of eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing through its affect on chromatin architecture (2-4). Additional studies show that RIF1 is essential for regulating the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). RIF1 is recruited to sites of DSBs by 53BP1 in response to DNA damage, and suppresses 5' end resection to favor the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway over homologous recombination (HR) repair (5-9). Oct4 and Smad3 modulate Rif1 expression in mouse embryonic stem cells; Rif1 may regulate embryonic stem cell stability during cell proliferation (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ring1A plays a role in polycomb group (PcG) protein function. PcG proteins are critically involved in transcriptional repression of Hox genes during development (1,2). PcG proteins form two distinct complexes: EED-EZH2 and the PRC complex, which is composed of at least Bmi1 and Ring1A/Ring1B. The EZH2-containing complex is responsible for the methylation of H3K27, and the PRC complex ubiquitylates H2A. EZH2 methylation is required prior to PRC ubiquitylation, and both are essential for Hox gene repression (3). It has recently been shown that PcG proteins silence a group of developmentally important regulator genes, referred to as bivalent genes (4). This regulation may be responsible for the ability of stem cells to self renew or switch to differentiate into multipotent progenitors. Aberrant epigenetic silencing by PcG proteins is also thought to be important in tumorigenesis (5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RING1B (D22F2) XP® Rabbit mAb #5694.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell-cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, Eed-Ezh2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. This histone methyltransferase activity requires the Ezh2, Eed, and Suz12 subunits of the complex (5). Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinates histone H2A on Lys119 (6). PRC1 is composed of Bmi1 and RING1A (also RING1 or RNF1), both of which act to enhance the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of an additional catalytic subunit RING1B (also RING2 or RNF2) (7). PcG proteins play an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and senescence through repression of the p16 INK4A and p19 ARF genes and are required for maintenance of adult hematopoietic and neural stem cells, as well as embryonic stem cells (3,4,8-10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell-cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, Eed-Ezh2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. This histone methyltransferase activity requires the Ezh2, Eed, and Suz12 subunits of the complex (5). Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinates histone H2A on Lys119 (6). PRC1 is composed of Bmi1 and RING1A (also RING1 or RNF1), both of which act to enhance the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of an additional catalytic subunit RING1B (also RING2 or RNF2) (7). PcG proteins play an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and senescence through repression of the p16 INK4A and p19 ARF genes and are required for maintenance of adult hematopoietic and neural stem cells, as well as embryonic stem cells (3,4,8-10).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP (D94C12) XP® Rabbit mAb #3493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP (D94C12) XP® Rabbit mAb #3493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP (D94C12) XP® Rabbit mAb #3493.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor Interacting Protein 2 (RIP2) is a serine/threonine kinase with a carboxy-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD). Association of RIP2 with the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) causes activation of NF-κB and induction of apoptosis (1-3). Expression of RIP2 is induced in macrophages upon exposure to bacterial cell wall components, such as LPS. RIP2-deficient mouse models demonstrate that this kinase integrates and transduces signals for both the innate and adaptive immune system (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and CellSimple™ cell-assay analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated RIP3 (D4G2A) Rabbit mAb #95702.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) family that associates with Raf-1 and the MEK and MAP kinases (1). RKIP has been shown to form a complex with Raf-1, MEK, and Erk (2). Although MEK and Erk can simultaneously bind RKIP, the association between Raf-1 and RKIP and that of RKIP and MEK are mutually exclusive. Thus, RKIP competitively disrupts the Raf-1-MEK complex and effectively terminates signal transmission from Raf-1 to MAP kinases (2). The inhibitory effect of RKIP on MAP kinase signaling is eliminated by PKC phosphorylation of RKIP at Ser153 (3). PKC phosphorylation on Ser153 also promotes the association of RKIP with GRK2, which prevents GRK2-dependent internalization of GPCR (4). RKIP also interacts with modules of the NF-κB pathway, including NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), TAK1, IKKα and IKKβ (5). These interactions antagonize cytokine-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway (5). Restoration of RKIP expression is associated with the inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis, implying that RKIP may be a potential clinical target as a suppressor of tumor metastasis through inhibition of vascular invasion (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RNase L is an antiviral protein that is expressed in most mammalian cells (1). Latent RNase L in the cytoplasm is activated by the second messenger 2’,5’-linked oligoadenylate (2-5A), which is produced by oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) after it binds viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) (2, 3). RNase L forms a crossed homodimer that is stabilized by kinase homology and ankyrin domains, which position two kinase extension nuclease domains for RNA recognition (4). RNase L then degrades both viral and cellular RNA (5). In mouse models, RNase L has been shown to produce small self-RNAs that act to amplify innate antiviral immunity through IFN-β induction (6). Research has also shown that RNase L forms a complex with Filamin A that acts as a barrier to restrict virus entry, and that RNase L can induce autophagy in response to viral infection (7, 8). Finally, research suggests RNase L may contribute to type I diabetes onset through immune response regulation (9).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In mammalian cells, the significance of histone H2B ubiquitination in chromatin epigenetics came from the identification of the budding yeast protein Bre1 (1,2). Together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6, Bre1 serves as the E3 ligase in the monoubiquitination of the yeast histone H2B within transcribed regions of chromatin (1-3). Subsequently, the mammalian orthologs of yeast Bre1, RNF20 and RNF40, were identified (4,5). These two proteins form a tight heterodimer that acts as the major E3 ligase responsible for histone H2B monoubiquitination at Lys120 in mammalian cells, a modification linked to RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation in undamaged cells. Researchers have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also capable of inducing monoubiquitination of H2B. This process depends upon the recruitment to DSB sites, as well as ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the RNF20-RNF40 heterodimer, thus highlighting a role for this E3 ligase in DSB repair pathways (6). Indeed, investigators have shown that loss of RNF20-RNF40 function promotes replication stress and chromosomal instability, which may constitute an early step in malignant transformation that precedes cell invasion (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROBO2 is a member of the roundabout (ROBO) receptor family (1). The activation of ROBO2 by SLIT ligand regulates various biological processes, including promoting stem cell senescence via WNT inhibition, destabilizing podocyte actin polymerization and adhesion, and activation of Ena/VASP to facilitate tumor cell extrusion from epithelia (2-5). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance and synapse function, retinal neurovascular formation, and muscle patterning (6-9). Loss of function mutations of ROBO2 have been associated with urinary tract anomalies and vesicoureteral reflux (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).