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Product listing: VCP (7F3) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P55072 #2649 to VIP (D8J1V) Rabbit mAb (IF Formulated), UniProt ID P01282 #63269

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved and abundant 97 kDa protein that belongs to the AAA (ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. VCP assembles as a homo-hexamer, forming a ring with a channel at its center (1,2,3). VCP homo-hexamers associate with a variety of protein cofactors to form many distinct protein complexes, which act as chaperones to unfold proteins and transport them to specific cellular compartments or to the proteosome (4). These protein complexes participate in many cellular functions, including vesicle transport and fusion, fragmentation and reassembly of the golgi stacks during mitosis, nuclear envelope formation and spindle disassembly following mitosis, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage repair, apoptosis, B- and T-cell activation, NF-κB-mediated transcriptional regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and protein degradation (4). VCP appears to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum; however, tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with relocalization to the centrosome during mitosis (5). In addition, following cellular exposure to ionizing radition, VCP is phosphorylated at Ser784 in an ATM-dependent manner and accumulates in the nucleus at sites of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) (6). Exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents such as UV light, bleomycin or doxorubicin results in phosphorylation of VCP by ATR and DNA-PK in an ATM-independent manner (6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VDAC (D73D12) Rabbit mAb #4661.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VE-Cadherin (D87F2) XP® Rabbit mAb #2500.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. VEGF Receptor 2 (55B11) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VEGF Receptor 2 (55B11) Rabbit mAb #2479.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$260
100 µl
$637
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VEGF Receptor 2 (D5B1) Rabbit mAb #9698.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VEGF Receptor 2 (D5B1) Rabbit mAb # 9698.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VEGF Receptor 2 (D5B1) Rabbit mAb #9698.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µg
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VCP-interacting membrane protein (VIMP, selenoprotein S) is a putative reductase and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein involved in the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway (1,2). Research studies indicate that VIMP may play a protective role against inflammation and reduce ER-stress (3). The VIMP protein is a single-pass, transmembrane protein that recruits the cytosolic p97/VCP AAA-ATPase and its cofactors, UFD1 and NPL4, to the ER membrane (4). An ER membrane complex containing Derlin-1 and VIMP forms a critical node in the ERAD machinery and links substrate recognition in the ER lumen with the retrotranslocation function of the p97/VCP AAA-ATPase in the cytosol (1,4). Polymorphisms in the corresponding VIMP gene are associated with spontaneous preterm births and cardiovascular disease risk (5,6) while other studies do not support a correspondence between VIMP polymorphisms and inflammatory disorders (7).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vinculin (E1E9V) XP® Rabbit mAb #13901.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide synthesized as a precursor that is processed to an active mature peptide of 28 residues (1). VIP is produced by neurons, endocrine, and immune cells and is expressed in many tissues, in agreement with its various biological functions (2). VIP acts through activation of two receptors belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor family, VPAC1 and VPAC2 (2) and elicits several effects such as vasodilation, regulation of smooth muscle cell contractility, and blood flow in the gastrointestinal track (3,4). In addition, VIP is involved in the regulation of T cell differentiation (6), and in immunosuppression (7,8).