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Product listing: Phospho-PEA-15 (Ser104) Antibody, UniProt ID Q15121 #2776 to Phospho-PRAS40 (Thr246) Antibody, UniProt ID Q96B36 #2640

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PEA-15 is a 15 kDa phosphoprotein expressed abundantly in astrocytes and fibroblasts as well as in tissues, including the lung and eye (1). The protein has been shown to coordinate cell growth, death, and glucose utilization (2-4). The amino-terminal DED domain of PEA-15 mediates its binding to FADD or Erk and further regulates the Erk and apoptosis signaling pathways. PEA-15 can be phosphorylated at two serine residues, Ser104 and Ser116, located within the carboxy terminus. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates binding to Erk and FADD (2,3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phospholamban (PLN) was identified as a major phosphoprotein component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (1). Its name, "lamban", is derived from the greek word "lambano" meaning "to receive", so named due to the fact that phospholamban is heavily phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues in response to cardiac stimulation (1). Although originally thought to be a single 20-25 kDa protein due to its electrophoretic mobility on SDS-PAGE, PLN is actually a 52 amino acid, 6 kDa, membrane-spanning protein capable of forming stable homooligomers, even in the presence of SDS (2). Despite very high expression in cardiac tissue, phospholamban is also expressed in skeletal and smooth muscle (3). Localization of PLN is limited to the SR, where it serves as a regulator of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, SERCA (4). PLN binds directly to SERCA and effectively lowers its affinity for calcium, thus reducing calcium transport into the SR. Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 by Protein Kinase A or myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and/or phosphorylation at Thr17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase results in release of PLN from SERCA, relief of this inhibition, and increased calcium uptake by the SR (reviewed in 5,6). It has long been held that phosphorylation at Ser16 and Thr17 occurs sequentially, but increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation, especially at Thr17, may be differentially regulated (reviewed in 7,8).Rodent models of heart failure have shown that the expression level and degree of phosphorylation of PLN are critical in modulating calcium flux and contractility (reviewed in 9-11). Deletion or decreased expression of PLN promotes increased calcium flux and increased cardiac contractility, whereas overexpression of PLN results in sequestration of SERCA, decreased calcium flux, reduced contractility, and rescue of cardiac dysfunction and failure in mouse models of hypertension and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10). Distinct mutations in PLN have been detected in humans, resulting either in decreased or no expression of PLN protein (12,13) or binding defects between PLN, SERCA and/or regulatory proteins (14,15), both of which result in cardiac myopathy and heart failure. Interestingly, while the human phenotype of most PLN defects mimic those seen in rodent and vice versa, there are some instances where the type and severity of cardiac disease resulting from PLN mutations in rodent and human differ, making a consensus mechanism elusive.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Three distinct types of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) have been characterized. Unlike other PI3Ks, PI3K class III catalyzes the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol at the D3 position, producing phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PIP3) (1). PI3K class III is the mammalian homolog of Vps34, first identified in yeast. PI3K class III interacts with the regular subunit p150, the mammalian homolog of Vps15, which regulates cellular membrane association through myristoylation (2,3). PIP3 recruits several proteins with FYVE or PX domains to membranes regulating vesicular transport and protein sorting (4). Moreover, PI3K class III has been shown to regulate autophagy, trimeric G-protein signaling, and the mTOR nutrient-sensing pathway (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Xenopus

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCgamma2 (Tyr1217) Antibody #3871.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: At least four distinct polo-like kinases exist in mammalian cells: PLK1, PLK2, PLK3, and PLK4/SAK (1). PLK1 apparently plays many roles during mitosis, particularly in regulating mitotic entry and exit. The mitosis promoting factor (MPF), cdc2/cyclin B1, is activated by dephosphorylation of cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15) by cdc25C. PLK1 phosphorylates cdc25C at Ser198 and cyclin B1 at Ser133 causing translocation of these proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus (2-5). PLK1 phosphorylation of Myt1 at Ser426 and Thr495 has been proposed to inactivate Myt1, one of the kinases known to phosphorylate cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 (6). Polo-like kinases also phosphorylate the cohesin subunit SCC1, causing cohesin displacement from chromosome arms that allow for proper cohesin localization to centromeres (7). Mitotic exit requires activation of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) (8), a ubiquitin ligase responsible for removal of cohesin at centromeres, and degradation of securin, cyclin A, cyclin B1, Aurora A, and cdc20 (9). PLK1 phosphorylation of the APC subunits Apc1, cdc16, and cdc27 has been demonstrated in vitro and has been proposed as a mechanism by which mitotic exit is regulated (10,11).Substitution of Thr210 with Asp has been reported to elevate PLK1 kinase activity and delay/arrest cells in mitosis, while a Ser137Asp substitution leads to S-phase arrest (12). In addition, while DNA damage has been found to inhibit PLK1 kinase activity, the Thr210Asp mutant is resistant to this inhibition (13). PLK1 has been reported to be phosphorylated in vivo at Ser137 and Thr210 in mitosis; DNA damage prevents phosphorylation at these sites (14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PNK (polynucleotide kinase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in single strand break repair and non-homologous end rejoining (NHEJ) for double strand breaks. PNK possesses a 5'-DNA kinase activity and a 3'-DNA phosphatase activity (1,2). It has three domains, a C-terminal kinase domain, a central phosphatase domain, and an N-terminal forkhead associated (FHA) domain that is responsible for protein-protein interactions. Reduction in expression of PNK by RNAi sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors (3)

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1), a serine/threonine phosphatase, is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Four isoforms of PP1 have been characterized: PP1α, PP1δ, PP1γ1 and PP1γ2 (1). Involvement in cell cycle regulation is one of the biological functions of PP1 (1). It has been illustrated that PP1 dephosphorylates Rb and cdc25 during mitosis (2,3). A cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation at Thr320 of PP1α by cdc2 kinase inhibits PP1α activity (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PPIG belongs to a highly conserved class of cyclophilins that function as peptidyl-prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) to catalyze the conversion of cis-proline to trans-proline in a polypeptide chain (1-4). PPIG contains an amino-terminal cyclophilin domain followed by Nopp140 repeats that are involved in its function as a nuclear chaperone (5). The carboxy-terminal of PPIG contains a SR (arginine-serine dipeptide repeat) domain (3,4) that is involved in pre-mRNA splicing and processing (6). PPIG interacts with the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II as well as several other SR family splicing factors. These interactions lead to changes in localization and conformation and suggest a regulatory role in transcription and pre-mRNA splicing in the elongating RNA polymerase complex (7,8). PPIG is found in the nuclear matrix and nuclear speckles and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. PPIG shows a predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic distribution at the onset of mitosis, and in late telophase the isomerase is recruited to the newly formed nuclei (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Many growth factors and hormones induce the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway, which results in the activation of downstream effector proteins such as the serine/threonine kinase Akt (1,2). One known Akt substrate is a 40 kDa, proline-rich protein (PRAS40) that binds to 14-3-3 proteins (2). PRAS40 also binds mTOR to transduce Akt signals to the mTOR complex. Inhibition of mTOR signaling stimulates PRAS40 binding to mTOR, which in turn inhibits mTOR activity (3). PRAS40 interacts with raptor in mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in insulin-deprived cells and inhibits the activation of the mTORC1 pathway mediated by the cell cycle protein Rheb. Phosphorylation of PRAS40 by Akt at Thr246 relieves PRAS40 inhibition of mTORC1 (4). mTORC1 in turn phosphorylates PRAS40 at Ser183 (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Many growth factors and hormones induce the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway, which results in the activation of downstream effector proteins such as the serine/threonine kinase Akt (1,2). One known Akt substrate is a 40 kDa, proline-rich protein (PRAS40) that binds to 14-3-3 proteins (2). PRAS40 also binds mTOR to transduce Akt signals to the mTOR complex. Inhibition of mTOR signaling stimulates PRAS40 binding to mTOR, which in turn inhibits mTOR activity (3). PRAS40 interacts with raptor in mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in insulin-deprived cells and inhibits the activation of the mTORC1 pathway mediated by the cell cycle protein Rheb. Phosphorylation of PRAS40 by Akt at Thr246 relieves PRAS40 inhibition of mTORC1 (4). mTORC1 in turn phosphorylates PRAS40 at Ser183 (5).