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Product listing: Phospho-PKCθ (Thr538) Antibody, UniProt ID Q04759 #9377 to Phospho-PZR (Tyr263) Antibody, UniProt ID O95297 #5543

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCgamma2 (Tyr1217) Antibody #3871.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: At least four distinct polo-like kinases exist in mammalian cells: PLK1, PLK2, PLK3, and PLK4/SAK (1). PLK1 apparently plays many roles during mitosis, particularly in regulating mitotic entry and exit. The mitosis promoting factor (MPF), cdc2/cyclin B1, is activated by dephosphorylation of cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15) by cdc25C. PLK1 phosphorylates cdc25C at Ser198 and cyclin B1 at Ser133 causing translocation of these proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus (2-5). PLK1 phosphorylation of Myt1 at Ser426 and Thr495 has been proposed to inactivate Myt1, one of the kinases known to phosphorylate cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 (6). Polo-like kinases also phosphorylate the cohesin subunit SCC1, causing cohesin displacement from chromosome arms that allow for proper cohesin localization to centromeres (7). Mitotic exit requires activation of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) (8), a ubiquitin ligase responsible for removal of cohesin at centromeres, and degradation of securin, cyclin A, cyclin B1, Aurora A, and cdc20 (9). PLK1 phosphorylation of the APC subunits Apc1, cdc16, and cdc27 has been demonstrated in vitro and has been proposed as a mechanism by which mitotic exit is regulated (10,11).Substitution of Thr210 with Asp has been reported to elevate PLK1 kinase activity and delay/arrest cells in mitosis, while a Ser137Asp substitution leads to S-phase arrest (12). In addition, while DNA damage has been found to inhibit PLK1 kinase activity, the Thr210Asp mutant is resistant to this inhibition (13). PLK1 has been reported to be phosphorylated in vivo at Ser137 and Thr210 in mitosis; DNA damage prevents phosphorylation at these sites (14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PNK (polynucleotide kinase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in single strand break repair and non-homologous end rejoining (NHEJ) for double strand breaks. PNK possesses a 5'-DNA kinase activity and a 3'-DNA phosphatase activity (1,2). It has three domains, a C-terminal kinase domain, a central phosphatase domain, and an N-terminal forkhead associated (FHA) domain that is responsible for protein-protein interactions. Reduction in expression of PNK by RNAi sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors (3)

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1), a serine/threonine phosphatase, is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Four isoforms of PP1 have been characterized: PP1α, PP1δ, PP1γ1 and PP1γ2 (1). Involvement in cell cycle regulation is one of the biological functions of PP1 (1). It has been illustrated that PP1 dephosphorylates Rb and cdc25 during mitosis (2,3). A cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation at Thr320 of PP1α by cdc2 kinase inhibits PP1α activity (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PPIG belongs to a highly conserved class of cyclophilins that function as peptidyl-prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) to catalyze the conversion of cis-proline to trans-proline in a polypeptide chain (1-4). PPIG contains an amino-terminal cyclophilin domain followed by Nopp140 repeats that are involved in its function as a nuclear chaperone (5). The carboxy-terminal of PPIG contains a SR (arginine-serine dipeptide repeat) domain (3,4) that is involved in pre-mRNA splicing and processing (6). PPIG interacts with the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II as well as several other SR family splicing factors. These interactions lead to changes in localization and conformation and suggest a regulatory role in transcription and pre-mRNA splicing in the elongating RNA polymerase complex (7,8). PPIG is found in the nuclear matrix and nuclear speckles and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. PPIG shows a predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic distribution at the onset of mitosis, and in late telophase the isomerase is recruited to the newly formed nuclei (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Many growth factors and hormones induce the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway, which results in the activation of downstream effector proteins such as the serine/threonine kinase Akt (1,2). One known Akt substrate is a 40 kDa, proline-rich protein (PRAS40) that binds to 14-3-3 proteins (2). PRAS40 also binds mTOR to transduce Akt signals to the mTOR complex. Inhibition of mTOR signaling stimulates PRAS40 binding to mTOR, which in turn inhibits mTOR activity (3). PRAS40 interacts with raptor in mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in insulin-deprived cells and inhibits the activation of the mTORC1 pathway mediated by the cell cycle protein Rheb. Phosphorylation of PRAS40 by Akt at Thr246 relieves PRAS40 inhibition of mTORC1 (4). mTORC1 in turn phosphorylates PRAS40 at Ser183 (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Many growth factors and hormones induce the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway, which results in the activation of downstream effector proteins such as the serine/threonine kinase Akt (1,2). One known Akt substrate is a 40 kDa, proline-rich protein (PRAS40) that binds to 14-3-3 proteins (2). PRAS40 also binds mTOR to transduce Akt signals to the mTOR complex. Inhibition of mTOR signaling stimulates PRAS40 binding to mTOR, which in turn inhibits mTOR activity (3). PRAS40 interacts with raptor in mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in insulin-deprived cells and inhibits the activation of the mTORC1 pathway mediated by the cell cycle protein Rheb. Phosphorylation of PRAS40 by Akt at Thr246 relieves PRAS40 inhibition of mTORC1 (4). mTORC1 in turn phosphorylates PRAS40 at Ser183 (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The protein kinase C-related kinases (PRKs) are a subfamily of Ser/Thr-specific kinases with a catalytic domain highly homologous to the PKC family (1-3). They are effectors of Rho family GTPases (4-6) and are activated by fatty acids and phospholipids in vitro (7,8). Activation in vitro and in vivo involves the activation loop phosphorylation of PRK1 (Thr774)/PRK2 (Thr816) by PDK1 (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density Protein 93 (PSD93) is a member of the PSD subfamily of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (PSD-MAGUK) proteins. Structurally, it most closely resembles PSD95, consisting of an N-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, an SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain (1,2). PSD93 is expressed in neuronal cells and located at the synapse where it interacts with neuronal receptors and proteins including the NMDA receptor (2-4), K+ channels (5,6), and the AMPA receptor (7) to regulate their membrane localization and neuronal signaling. Research studies have implicated PSD93 in postsynaptic related persistent pain induction, making PSD93 a potential target for treatment of this syndrome (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTPα (PTPRA) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase implicated in the regulation of Src family kinases during the G2 to mitosis entry point. Two identified splice variants differ in the size of the extracellular region; the shorter form appears to be ubiquitously expressed while the larger protein is more limited in distribution (1). The cytoplasmic region of PTPα contains two putative catalytic domains. One phosphatase domain (D1) exhibits catalytic activity while the other (D2) may regulate phosphatase activity by allowing receptor dimer formation (2,3). PTPα is a physiological regulator of Src and Src family kinases (4). Constitutive phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal Tyr789 of PTPα is essential for dephosphorylation of Src at Tyr527. Phosphorylation of PTPα at this residue also allows binding of the Grb2 inhibitor, restricting PTPα activation of Src (5,6). PKC-mediated phosphorylation of the PTP at Ser180 and Ser204 also increases PTPα phosphatase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).