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Product listing: PSMA5 (K231) Antibody, UniProt ID P28066 #2457 to Rab11b Antibody, UniProt ID Q15907 #2414

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PSMD10/Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat chaperone protein that is involved in the assembly of the 19S regulatory particle of the proteasome (1). Reasearch studies have demonstrated that PSMD10 is oncogenic and is overexpressed in hepatocullar carcinomas (2). Investigators believe the oncogenicity of PSMD10 may be linked to its ability to bind and regulate the stability and activity of pRB, CDK4, MDM2, and RelA (2-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Patched1 and 2 (PTCH1 and PTCH2) are twelve-pass transmembrane proteins that function as the receiving receptors for members of the Hedgehog family of proteins (1-4). In the absence of Hedgehog proteins, PTCH suppresses the otherwise constitutively active signaling receptor Smoothened (Smo) so that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is in the off state (5,6). Deactivating mutations that impair the ability of PTCH1 to suppress Smo are frequently found in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (7,8). PTCH proteins have a sterol-sensing domain (SSD) also found in several proteins that function in cholesterol homeostasis, such as HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase) and SCAP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-cleavage activating protein). However, the role of the SSD in Patched proteins is not clear (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Patched1 and 2 (PTCH1 and PTCH2) are twelve-pass transmembrane proteins that function as the receiving receptors for members of the Hedgehog family of proteins (1-4). In the absence of Hedgehog proteins, PTCH suppresses the otherwise constitutively active signaling receptor Smoothened (Smo) so that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is in the off state (5,6). Deactivating mutations that impair the ability of PTCH1 to suppress Smo are frequently found in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (7,8). PTCH proteins have a sterol-sensing domain (SSD) also found in several proteins that function in cholesterol homeostasis, such as HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase) and SCAP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-cleavage activating protein). However, the role of the SSD in Patched proteins is not clear (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is the original member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of proteins (1). PTP1B is highly expressed in insulin-responsive tissues and negatively regulates insulin, as well as integrin, through dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine residues (2-4). PTP1B knockout mice show resistance to dietary weight gain and enhanced insulin sensitivity, suggesting a possible role in treatment of obesity as well as type 2 diabetes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL) family is a distinct group of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), containing a signature phosphatase domain but otherwise lacking homology to known PTP proteins. There are currently three known members of the PRL family (PRL1-3). PRL-1 was the first family member to be identified; it was initially characterized as an immediate early gene (IEG) in regenerating liver and mitogen-treated fibroblasts (1). PRL-3, known widely as PTP4A3, is now the most well-characterized member of the PRL family, due to its important role in regulating cell proliferation, and possibly cancer metastasis. While specific substrates of the PRL-family proteins have remained largely undefined, a recent study in colon cancer cell lines reported that PTP4A3 dephosphorylated integrin β1 at Tyr783 (2). PTP4A3 was also shown to play a potential role in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation of the docking protein p130 (3). Increased rates of both cell proliferation and motility have been observed in immortalized cell lines and murine lung tumor cells over-expressing PTP4A3 (3,4), and elevated levels of PTP4A3 protein are associated with a subset of human cancers (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). Active protein phosphatase 2A is composed of both structural (A) and catalytic (C) proteins, and its activity relies on interaction with regulatory (B) subunits. An important PP2A regulatory subunit is PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as the PP2A activator regulatory subunit 4 (PPP2R4) (4). This PTPA regulatory protein binds ATP and has isomerase (PPIase) activity, suggesting that PP2A regulation involves a change in phosphatase conformation. The addition of ATP (and Mg2+) results in a correlated increase in both PP2A activation and PTPA isomerase activity (5). While the exact mechanism is still under consideration, evidence suggests that binding of PTPA to the PP2A A-C dimer produces a conformational change in PP2A that shifts phosphatase substrate specificity from phosphoserine to phosphotyrosine substrates (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PU.1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors and activates target genes through the purine-rich PU-box (1). PU.1 plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of myeloid cells and lymphocytes and is expressed in several hematopoietic cells including B lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, mast cells, early erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes (1,2). The concentration of PU.1 is critical for both the determination of hematopoietic cell lineage and the regulation of differentiation versus stem cell proliferation (3,4). In addition, PU.1 activity is influenced by phosphorylation and interactions with other hematopoietic transcription factors. Phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser146 by CK2 promotes binding to IRF4 and synergistic activation through the immunoglobulin κ 3' enhancer (5). Treatment of pro-B cells with IL-3 leads to phosphorylation of PU.1 at Ser140, resulting in increased PU.1 activity and activation of the anti-apoptotic gene MCL-1 (6). GATA1 binding blocks PU.1 activity during erythroid cell development (7). Overexpression of PU.1 resulting from proviral insertion during Friend virus infection can induce erythroleukemia, while reduced expression has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pumilio 1 and Pumilio 2 (PUM1, PUM2, or Pumilio homolog 1 and 2, respectively) are evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins that are thought to repress translation and stability of mRNA targets by binding to the 3'-UTR of specific RNA sequences (1). Pumilio proteins have been implicated in the regulation of genes involved in embryogenesis and germline cell development (2). Research studies have shown that PUM2 may have a role in neural stem cell fate decisions (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pumilio 1 and Pumilio 2 (PUM1, PUM2, or Pumilio homolog 1 and 2, respectively) are evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins that are thought to repress translation and stability of mRNA targets by binding to the 3'-UTR of specific RNA sequences (1). Pumilio proteins have been implicated in the regulation of genes involved in embryogenesis and germline cell development (2). Research studies have shown that PUM2 may have a role in neural stem cell fate decisions (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus Receptor-Related Immunoglobulin Domain-Containing Protein (PVRIG; also known as CD112 receptor) is a multiple transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of T cells and NK cells, predominantly on memory and effector CD8+ T cells. PVRIG expression is upregulated after in vitro T cell activation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. PVRIG competes with DNAM-1/CD226 for interaction with the receptor ligand Nectin-2. Upon ligation of PVRIG and Nectin-2, T cell proliferation is inhibited, suggesting PVRIG is a co-inhibitory receptor that dampens T cell functions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1) catalyzes the last step in proline biosynthesis (1). Research studies show that proline is a limiting amino acid to clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). PYCR1 expression is induced in kidney cancer cells to compensate for the proline shortage and maintain cancer cell growth. Furthermore, PYCR1 knockdown inhibits ccRCC cell proliferation in the absence of proline, suggesting this enzyme as a potential cancer therapeutic target (2). In addition, breast cancer cells also express high levels of PYCR1 (2,3). Proline is restrictive to invasive ductal breast carcinoma cells, indicating proline vulnerability in the breast cancer formation (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2, also called CAKβ, RAFTK and CADTK, is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase structurally related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1-4). Pyk2 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from hematopoietic lineages and in the central nervous system. Pyk2 is one of the signaling mediators for the G-protein-coupled receptors and MAP kinase signaling pathway. It plays an important role in cell spreading and migration (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Quaking (QKI) is a member of the signal transduction and activator of RNA (STAR) protein family of RNA binding proteins (1,2). Mutations in the mouse Qki locus results in impaired myelin formation resulting in tremors (3). QKI proteins exist as homodimers, and disruption of the dimerization process is lethal in mice (2). QKI exists in different isoforms that differ in their C-terminus, resulting in unique subcellular localizations (4). The nuclear isoform of QKI, QKI-5, is involved in regulation of alternative splicing of MAG mRNA, which encodes for a protein important for myelin sheath formation and maintenance (4,5). QKI has also been implicated in schizophrenia and oligodendrocyte differentiation (6). QKI can function as a tumor suppressor, as it is regulated by p53 to stabilize miRNAs that regulate TGF-Β signaling (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: R-Ras, a member of the small GTPase family, is homologous to H-, K- and N-Ras, but does not activate MAP kinase pathways and is only weakly oncogenic (1). Instead, R-Ras is engaged in integrin activation (2). The effector loop and the carboxy-terminal proline-rich and prenylation sites of R-Ras are critical for integrin activation (3,4). Phosphorylation by EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase and Src at Tyr66 of R-Ras suppresses integrin activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rab10 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small Rab GTPases (1) that interacts with Mss4, myosin V (Va, Vb and Vc) and GDI as it helps mediate sorting among cellular endosomes (2-4). Mutation analysis and GFP-fusion protein expression of Rab10 in MDCK cells determined that Rab10 plays a regulatory role in membrane protein transport between early endosomes and basolateral compartments (5,6). Rab10 associates with the GLUT4 complex as a target for AS160 and is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 family of small Ras-like GTPases. Rab11 (isoforms Rab11a and Rab11b) functions as a key regulator in the recycling of perinuclear, plasma membrane and Golgi compartment endosomes (1,2). Despite some overlap, distinct differences exist between Rab11a and Rab11b in both their cellular distribution and functional roles. Rab11a is ubiquitously expressed while Rab11b is found mainly in the heart and brain (3,4). Like other Rab proteins, Rab11 exerts its function via interactions with Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). While there are three distinct classes of FIPs, all appear to share a conserved carboxy-terminal Rab-binding domain that allows Rab-FIP protein interaction. When bound together, these proteins are thought to regulate membrane-associated protein sorting (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 family of small Ras-like GTPases. Rab11 (isoforms Rab11a and Rab11b) functions as a key regulator in the recycling of perinuclear, plasma membrane and Golgi compartment endosomes (1,2). Despite some overlap, distinct differences exist between Rab11a and Rab11b in both their cellular distribution and functional roles. Rab11a is ubiquitously expressed while Rab11b is found mainly in the heart and brain (3,4). Like other Rab proteins, Rab11 exerts its function via interactions with Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). While there are three distinct classes of FIPs, all appear to share a conserved carboxy-terminal Rab-binding domain that allows Rab-FIP protein interaction. When bound together, these proteins are thought to regulate membrane-associated protein sorting (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 family of small Ras-like GTPases. Rab11 (isoforms Rab11a and Rab11b) functions as a key regulator in the recycling of perinuclear, plasma membrane and Golgi compartment endosomes (1,2). Despite some overlap, distinct differences exist between Rab11a and Rab11b in both their cellular distribution and functional roles. Rab11a is ubiquitously expressed while Rab11b is found mainly in the heart and brain (3,4). Like other Rab proteins, Rab11 exerts its function via interactions with Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). While there are three distinct classes of FIPs, all appear to share a conserved carboxy-terminal Rab-binding domain that allows Rab-FIP protein interaction. When bound together, these proteins are thought to regulate membrane-associated protein sorting (5,6).