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Product listing: Initiator Caspases Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID P42574 #12675 to mTOR Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID P42345 #9964

The Initiator Caspases Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating initiator (apical) caspase proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.
The Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in innate immunity using phospho-specific, cleavage-specific, and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system responds rapidly to pathogens by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). There are several families of PRRs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane PRRs and signal through recruitment of adaptor proteins, including MyD88, which leads to recruitment and phosphorylation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, followed by activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases (1-3). Some TLRs also activate IRFs, which upregulate the type I interferon response. Activation of TLR3 and TLR4 results in phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3, while TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 lead to activation of IRF-7 (2, 3). STING is a multi-pass ER transmembrane protein that is activated in response to intracellular DNA downstream of DNA-sensing cytoplasmic PRRs, such as DDX41, or by binding the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by cGAS (4-6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes, leading to phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3 and NF-κB (7, 8). Following activation and translocation, STING gets phosphorylated by ULK1, resulting in STING inactivation and degradation (9). Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic multimeric protein complexes that assemble in response to PAMPs or DAMPs detected by AIM2 or members of the nod-like receptor (NLR) family, such as NLRP3 (10). Inflammasomes activate Caspase-1, which cleaves the IL-1β and IL-18 precursor proteins into the mature forms (10).

The Insulin Receptor Substrate Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate IRS-1 and IRS-2 signaling and phosphorylation within the cell. The kit contains enough antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

The Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting select components involved in the insulin and/or IGF-1 signaling pathways. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments per antibody.

Background: Insulin and IGF-1 act on two closely related tyrosine kinase receptors to initiate a cascade of signaling events. These signaling events activate a variety of biological molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which regulate cell growth, survival and metabolism.Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (9-11). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (10,11). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (12) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (13,14).Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (15). Tuberin is phosphorylated on Ser939 and Thr1462 in response to PI3K activation and the human TSC complex is a direct biochemical target of the PI3K/Akt pathway (16). This result complements Drosophila genetics studies suggesting the possible involvement of the tuberin-hamartin complex in the PI3K/Akt mediated insulin pathway (17-19).The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (20-22) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (23,24). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (25). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (26,27).The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (28-30). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (31-33). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (34).Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (35). GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (36,37).

The Integrin Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to screen samples for α and β subunits of integrin molecules. The kit includes enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two Western blot experiments with each antibody.
The IRAK Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine total protein levels of the four Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase family members: IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4.

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

The IRS-1 Inhibition Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate insulin signaling negative feedback loops via phosphorylation of various IRS-1 serine residues. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Jak/Stat Pathway Inhibitors Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several inhibitors of Jak/Stat signaling, including PIAS1, PIAS3, PIAS4, SOCS1, SOCS2, and SOCS3. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Jumonji Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of Jumonji family proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Lipolysis Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of multiple members of the lipolysis pathway, including phosphorylated HSL and perilipin. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western mini-blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit contains antibodies to a variety of housekeeping proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots per primary antibody.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit (HRP Conjugate) contains antibodies directed against a variety of housekeeping proteins. These Cell Signaling Technology antibodies are conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blots.
The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to detect a variety of housekeeping proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.
The Lysine Acetyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several lysine acetyltrasferases, including: Acetyl-CBP, CBP, GCN5L2, and PCAF. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Lysine Methyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate endogenous levels of lysine methyltransferases. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The MAPK Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of p38, p44/42, and SAPK/JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2), SAPK/JNK, and p38 MAPK function in protein kinase cascades that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and control of cellular responses to cytokines and stress. p44/42 MAPK is activated by growth and neurotrophic factors. Activation occurs through phosphorylation of threonine and tyrosine residues (Thr202 and Tyr204 in human Erk1) at the sequence T*EY* by a single upstream MAP kinase kinase (MEK). SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK are activated by inflammatory cytokines and by a wide variety of cellular stresses. Activation of SAPK/JNK occurs via phosphorylation at Thr183 and Tyr185 by the dual specificity enzyme SEK/MKK4. Both MKK3 and SEK phosphorylate p38 MAPK on tyrosine and threonine at the sequence T*GY* to activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5).

The MAPKAPK-2 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating levels of MAPKAPK-2 protein phosphorylated at specific sites, as well as total MAPKAPK-2 protein levels. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: In response to cytokines, stress, and chemotactic factors, MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2) is rapidly phosphorylated and activated. It has been shown that MAPKAPK-2 is a direct target of p38 MAPK (1). Multiple residues of MAPKAPK-2 are phosphorylated in vivo in response to stress. However, only four residues (Thr25, Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334) are phosphorylated by p38 MAPK in an in vitro kinase assay (2). Phosphorylation at Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334 appears to be essential for the activity of MAPKAPK-2 (2). Thr25 is phosphorylated by p42 MAPK in vitro, but is not required for the activation of MAPKAPK-2 (2).

The Matrix Remodeling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting different MMPs and TIMPs using the specific corresponding antibodies. The kit contains enough antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Matrix remodeling is mainly controlled by MMPs and TIMPs. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, matrix structural proteins, and other proteases (1, 2). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP14 (MT1-MMP) have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (3). MMP activity is regulated by mechanisms of both transcriptional control and post translational protein processing. Once synthesized, MMPs exist as latent proenzymes. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full-length protein (4). MMP activity can be inhibited through its binding to endogenously expressed TIMPs. TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases that include TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding MMPs and chelating their zinc cofactor at the catalytic site to inhibit the proteinase function (5,6).

The Met Signaling Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate Met signaling. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots with each antibody.
The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys27 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys36) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys36 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys4) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys79) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys79 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Mitochondrial Dynamics Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine signaling involved in mitochondrial dynamics. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: Import of proteins into the mitochondria is regulated by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex, which facilitates transport through the outer mitochondrial membrane, and a complementary translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complex, responsible for protein transport to the mitochondrial matrix. The TOM complex consists of the receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70, and the channel-forming protein Tom40 (1). Tom20 is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and initially recognizes precursors with a presequence to facilitate protein import across the outer mitochondrial membrane (2).Changes in mitochondrial dynamics regulated by environmental cues affect mitochondrial size and shape and have been shown to dramatically impact mitochondrial metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy (3). These processes are largely controlled by mitochondrial dynamin-related GTPases, including mitofusin-1, mitofusin-2, OPA1, and DRP1. DRP1 regulates mitochondrial fission, while the mitofusins and OPA1 control fusion at the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane, respectively. These proteins are tightly regulated. OPA1 activity is regulated through alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, including complex proteolytic processing by multiple proteases (4-9). In addition, OPA1 expression can be induced under conditions of metabolic demand through a pathway involving Parkin induced NF-κB activation (10). DRP1 is regulated in part through multiple phosphorylation sites (11). Phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by MAPK or during mitosis by CDKs stimulates mitochondrial fission (12-14). Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (15-18). AMPK directly phosphorylates MFF at two sites to allow for enhanced recruitment of Drp1 to the mitochondria (19). 

The Mitochondrial Marker Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate relevant mitochondial proteins. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosome-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1, 2). Selective autophagy targets the degradation of distinct sets of substrates and organelles (3-5). One of the best studied examples of selective autophagy involves the clearance of damaged mitochondria through a process called mitophagy. Several pathways have been described for various contexts of mitophagy, including the FUNDC1 pathway, the BNIP3 and BNIP3L/Nix pathway, and the PINK1/Parkin pathway. FUNDC1 is a mitochondrial protein that is phosphorylated by the autophagy kinase ULK1 and regulates hypoxia induced mitophagy (6, 7). BNIP3L/Nix and BNIP3 are members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis regulators that are expressed on mitochondria, induced by hypoxia, and have have been shown to play a role in mitophagy (8). BNIP3L/Nix is also important in the autophagic maturation of erythroid cells (9). FUNDC1, BNIP3 and BNIP3L/Nix bind to LC3 family members, targeting the mitochondria to the autophagosome.Non-hypoxic induction of mitophagy can be regulated by the PINK1/Parkin pathway, which plays causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, most notably Parkinson’s disease (10, 11). PINK1 is a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase that is stabilized on the outer mitochondrial membrane of damaged mitochondria. Substrates of PINK1 include the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and ubiquitin itself (12-14). Phosphorylation of Parkin as well as binding to phosphorylated ubiquitin leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated chains on multiple mitochondrial proteins. Ubiquitinated proteins are recognized by selective cargo receptors including SQSTM1/p62, Optineurin, and NDP52 (15-16). Autophagy cargo receptors contain an LC3-interacting region (LIR) required for binding to Atg8/LC3 family members and targeting to the autophagosome (3).

The Mouse Immune Cell Phenotyping IHC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the accumulation of immune cell types in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 3 (CD3) is a multiunit protein complex expressed on the surface of T-cells that directly associates with the T-cell receptor (TCR). CD3 is composed of four polypeptides: ζ, γ, ε and δ. Engagement of TCR complex with antigens presented in Major Histocompatibility Complexes (MHC) induces tyrosine phosphorylation in the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) of CD3 proteins. CD3 phosphorylation is required for downstream signaling through ZAP-70 and p85 subunit of PI-3 kinase, leading to T cell activation, proliferation, and effector functions (1). Cluster of Differentiation 8 (CD8) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed primarily on cytotoxic T cells, but has also been described on a subset of dendritic cells in mice (2,3). On T cells, CD8 is a co-receptor for the TCR, and these two distinct structures are required to recognize antigen bound to MHC Class I (2). Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the TCR, and these two distinct structures recognize antigen bound to MHC Class II. CD8 and CD4 co-receptors ensure specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolong the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell, and recruit the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (2). Granzyme B is a serine protease expressed by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells and is a key component of the immune response to pathogens and transformed cancer cells (4). Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) is crucial for the development of T cells with immunosuppressive regulatory properties and is a well-established marker for T regulatory cells (Tregs) (5). CD19 is a co-receptor expressed on B cells that amplifies the signaling cascade initiated by the B cell receptor (BCR) to induce activation. It is a biomarker of B lymphocyte development, lymphoma diagnosis, and can be utilized as a target for leukemia immunotherapies (6,7). F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (8). CD11c (integrin αX, ITGAX) is a transmembrane glycoprotein highly expressed by dendritic cells, and has also been observed on activated NK cells, subsets of B and T cells, monocytes, granulocytes, and some B cell malignancies including hairy cell leukemia (9,10).

MRN Complex Antibody Sampler Kit offers an economical way of detecting each target protein. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The mTOR Pathway Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to investigate the control of protein translation, cell growth, and proliferation through mTOR signaling within cells. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).