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Product listing: CDK10 (D8Z7Z) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q15131 #36106 to cGAS (D1D3G) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q8N884 #15102

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin Dependent Kinase 10 (CDK10) is a Cdc2-related protein kinase that binds to and inhibits the transactivation activity of the transcription factor Ets2 (1).CDK10 is activated by cyclin M, which is mutated and unable to activate CDK10 in the human developmental disorder, STAR syndrome. Phosphorylation of Ets2 by CDK10/Cyclin M leads to degradation of Ets2 by the proteasome (2). CDK10 also plays a role in the development of the zebrafish nervous system (3). Studies have shown that expression of CDK10, which is modulated by promoter hypermethylation, is decreased in human cancer (4-6). Further, studies show that CDK10 expression in breast cancer affects response to tamoxifen (7), and is correlated with disease progression (8). CDK10 regulates the expression of c-RAF, and signaling through the MAPK pathway (2-3, 6-7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CDK2 (78B2) Rabbit mAb #2546.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p33CDK2) is an important component of the cell cycle machinery. Like p34cdc2, kinase activity is regulated by phosphorylation state as well as association with a cyclin subunit and a CDK inhibitor. Inhibitory phosphorylation occurs on Thr14 and Tyr15 (1). Inhibition of CDK2-cyclin complexes can also be attributed to association with p27 Kip1 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (2). Activation of CDK2 complexes requires dephosphorylation of Thr14 and Tyr15 by cdc25 phosphatase and phosphorylation of Thr160 (3), which is mediated by CAK, a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H (4). CDK2/cyclin E kinase activity is important for the G1 to S transition and phosphorylation of the Rb protein. During S-phase, active CDK2/cyclin A complexes predominate and phosphorylate E2F and the active CDK2 complex persists in the nucleus throughout G2 (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p33CDK2) is an important component of the cell cycle machinery. Like p34cdc2, kinase activity is regulated by phosphorylation state as well as association with a cyclin subunit and a CDK inhibitor. Inhibitory phosphorylation occurs on Thr14 and Tyr15 (1). Inhibition of CDK2-cyclin complexes can also be attributed to association with p27 Kip1 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (2). Activation of CDK2 complexes requires dephosphorylation of Thr14 and Tyr15 by cdc25 phosphatase and phosphorylation of Thr160 (3), which is mediated by CAK, a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H (4). CDK2/cyclin E kinase activity is important for the G1 to S transition and phosphorylation of the Rb protein. During S-phase, active CDK2/cyclin A complexes predominate and phosphorylate E2F and the active CDK2 complex persists in the nucleus throughout G2 (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CDK4 (D9G3E) Rabbit mAb #12790.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase activity is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation (Thr172 in the case of CDK4), by the abundance of their cyclin partners, and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of CDK4/cyclin D and p27 Kip1/Cip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27, which affects progression through the restriction point and pRb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of CDK4/cyclin D targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). In HeLa cells, upon UV irradiation, upregulation of p16 INK4A association with CDK4/cyclin D3 leads to a G2 delay, implicating CDK4/cyclin D3 activity in progression through the G2-phase of the cell cycle (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase activity is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation (Thr172 in the case of CDK4), by the abundance of their cyclin partners, and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of CDK4/cyclin D and p27 Kip1/Cip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27, which affects progression through the restriction point and pRb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of CDK4/cyclin D targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). In HeLa cells, upon UV irradiation, upregulation of p16 INK4A association with CDK4/cyclin D3 leads to a G2 delay, implicating CDK4/cyclin D3 activity in progression through the G2-phase of the cell cycle (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons to regulate the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, the regulatory subunits p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, with high levels of kinase activity detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no substrates have been specifically attributed to p35 or p39. Substrates of CDK5 include p35, PAK1, Src, β-catenin, tau, neurofilament-H, neurofilament-M, synapsin-1, APP, DARPP32, PP1-inhibitor, and Rb. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, likely as a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Research studies have shown accumulation of p25 in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons to regulate the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, the regulatory subunits p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, with high levels of kinase activity detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no substrates have been specifically attributed to p35 or p39. Substrates of CDK5 include p35, PAK1, Src, β-catenin, tau, neurofilament-H, neurofilament-M, synapsin-1, APP, DARPP32, PP1-inhibitor, and Rb. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, likely as a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Research studies have shown accumulation of p25 in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cyclin-dependent kinases form complexes with their cyclin partners and with CDK inhibitors. CDK6 and CDK4 associate with the D-type cyclins and target the retinoblastoma protein, allowing passage through the G1/S phase restriction point (1). CDK6/cyclin D complexes are sequestered in their inactive form through binding to one of the INK4 CDK inhibitor family members (2,3). Unlike the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, the CDK inhibitor p21 Waf1/Cip1 may enhance the association of CDK4 and CDK6 with their cyclin D partners (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cyclin-dependent kinases form complexes with their cyclin partners and with CDK inhibitors. CDK6 and CDK4 associate with the D-type cyclins and target the retinoblastoma protein, allowing passage through the G1/S phase restriction point (1). CDK6/cyclin D complexes are sequestered in their inactive form through binding to one of the INK4 CDK inhibitor family members (2,3). Unlike the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, the CDK inhibitor p21 Waf1/Cip1 may enhance the association of CDK4 and CDK6 with their cyclin D partners (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian Mediator Complex is a multi-subunit protein complex that couples specific transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the basal transcription machinery. Interactions between distinct Mediator subunits and transcription factors allow for specific gene regulation (reviewed in 1).Mediator complex interactions control various biological processes, including insulin signaling (2), NF-κB-dependent signaling (3), stem cell pluripotency and self renewal (4,5), and proliferation of colon cancer cells (6,7).CDK8/Cyclin C, along with Med12 and Med13, constitute a subcomplex within the Mediator Complex thought to act as a molecular switch, inhibiting Pol II recruitment and transcription initiation (8,9). Expression of CDK8 abrogates E2F-1-dependent inhibition of β-catenin activity in colon cancer cells (9). High levels of CDK8 coincide with high β-catenin-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells, and their proliferation can be inhibited by suppressing CDK8 expression (8).CDK8 can phosphorylate Ser727 on STAT1, which reduces natural killer (NK) cell toxicity (10,11). As such, inhibitors are being pursued as potential therapeutics to enhance NK cell activity and combat a variety of cancer types (12,13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CDK9 (C12F7) Rabbit mAb #2316.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: P-TEFb is a general transcription factor that regulates transcription elongation through phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The P-TEFb complex is composed of a catalytic subunit, CDK9, and its regulatory cyclin partner, which can be cyclin T1, T2a, T2b or K (reviewed in 1,2). P-TEFb is recruited by the HIV Tat protein to allow transcriptional elongation, and subsequent replication of the viral genome. Inhibition of P-TEFb function therefore has potential for HIV therapy. CDK9 exists as two isoforms, an abundant 42 kDa isoform, and a less abundant 55 kDa isoform, which contains an amino-terminal extension (3). The two forms likely have distinct purposes based on differential expression during lymphocyte activation (4,5) and on their localization within the nucleus (5).Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated in part by cyclin binding and by phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the T-loop domain. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at the T-loop Thr186 by an unidentified nuclear kinase may be important in P-TEFb activation (6) and regulation of HIV transcription (7). Acetylation of CDK9 at Lys44 affects its ability to phosphorylate the RNAPII CTD (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome, and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of prereplication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The prereplication complex (Pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. The MCM complex is thought to be the replicative helicase, and formation of the pre-RC is referred to as chromatin licensing. Subsequent initiation of DNA replication requires the activation of the S-phase promoting kinases CDK2 and cdc7. Cdc7, which is active only in complex with its regulatory subunit dbf4, phosphorylates MCM proteins bound to chromatin and allows binding of the replication factor cdc45 and DNA polymerase (3,4).Binding of CDT1 to geminin prevents pre-RC formation, and expression and degradation of geminin serve to regulate CDT1 activity (reviewed in 5). The interaction of CDT1 with MCM proteins is important in pre-RC formation and licensing (6,7). Both cdc6 and CDT1 are degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in response to DNA damage associated with rereplication (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDX2, a homeobox domain-containing transcription factor, is a master regulator of the trophoectoderm, the layer that gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues in mammalian development (1). CDX2 is also involved in intestinal development (2), and gain of expression or loss of expression has been associated with various human malignancies such as Barret Esophagus (3) and colorectal cancer (4,5). Mouse embryonic stem cells deficient in CDX2 display limited hematopoietic progenitor development and altered Hox gene expression (6), pointing to a role for CDX2 in Hox gene regulation. CDX2 is also implicated in the aberrant expression of Hox genes in human AML cell lines (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), also known as CD66e or CEACAM5, is a 180-200 kDa cell surface glycoprotein whose expression is elevated in intestinal carcinomas and other tumors. CEA mediates cell adhesion, though little more is known about its biological activity. Expression of CEA is correlated with tumerogenicity (1), and it has been shown to play a role in cell migration, adhesion and invasion in culture cells, as well as in metastasis in vivo (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CEACAM1 (also known as C-CAM and CD66a) is a member of CEA-related cell-adhesion molecule (CEACAM) subfamily of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family (1). CEACAM1 is expressed by certain epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Human CEACAM1 has many different splice variants; the abundance of CEACAM1 and the relative ratio of the different isoforms varies markedly among cell types and may be regulated in a context-dependent fashion. The isoforms with long (L) and short (S) cytoplasmic tails have different signaling properties. Notably, L isoforms contain a functional ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif) and several serine and threonine residues that could serve as potential phosphorylation targets. The extracellular domain of CEACAM1 is heavily glycosylated, making its apparent molecular weight during electrophoresis much larger than its predicted size (57.6 kDa) (2). CEACAM1 mediates intercellular adhesion through homo- and heterophilic interaction with other members of the CEACAM family. Studies indicate that CEACAM1 plays important roles in angiogenesis, neovascularization, insulin signaling, T cell signaling, and tumorigenesis (3-8). In addition, CEACAM1 can function as a receptor for several microbial pathogens (9,10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CEACAM1 (also known as C-CAM and CD66a) is a member of CEA-related cell-adhesion molecule (CEACAM) subfamily of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family (1). CEACAM1 is expressed by certain epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Human CEACAM1 has many different splice variants; the abundance of CEACAM1 and the relative ratio of the different isoforms varies markedly among cell types and may be regulated in a context-dependent fashion. The isoforms with long (L) and short (S) cytoplasmic tails have different signaling properties. Notably, L isoforms contain a functional ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif) and several serine and threonine residues that could serve as potential phosphorylation targets. The extracellular domain of CEACAM1 is heavily glycosylated, making its apparent molecular weight during electrophoresis much larger than its predicted size (57.6 kDa) (2). CEACAM1 mediates intercellular adhesion through homo- and heterophilic interaction with other members of the CEACAM family. Studies indicate that CEACAM1 plays important roles in angiogenesis, neovascularization, insulin signaling, T cell signaling, and tumorigenesis (3-8). In addition, CEACAM1 can function as a receptor for several microbial pathogens (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8), also known as CD66b, is a member of the CEA-related cell-adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family (1). CEACAMs bind to themselves and other family members to carry out numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, signaling, differentiation, tumor suppression, and survival (2). CEACAM8 is a single-chain, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, highly glycosylated protein that under normal conditions is expressed almost exclusively on granulocytes (3). Heterophilic interactions of CEACAM8 with other surface molecules, such as CEACAM6, have been shown to be involved in regulating cell adhesion in a calcium-independent manner (4). As such, CEACAM8 has demonstrated utility as a marker of neutrophil and eosinophil activation (5,6) and in pathological conditions is shown to be highly expressed in primary myelofibrosis and acute lymphoblastic leukemias (7,8). Assessment of CEACAM8 positive tumor-infiltrating neutrophils has demonstrated value as a prognostic factor in multiple cancer types (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CELSR2 (cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor, also known as flamingo homolog 3 or epidermal growth factor-like protein 2) is a member of the flamingo subfamily of non-classical cadherins, part of the cadherin superfamily. CELSR2 is a 7-transmembrane helix receptor that contains nine cadherin-like domains, seven EGF-like repeats, and 2 laminin A G-type repeats (1). It shares structural characteristics of both an adhesion molecule and a G protein-coupled receptor, suggesting putatives roles in both cell-cell adhesion and juxtacrine signaling. It's function has been associated with dendrite morphogenesis (2), neural plate anterior-posterior pattern formation (3), and regulation of transcription via the Wnt signaling pathway (4). In a loss-of-function mouse model, Celsr2 deletion resulted in defects in the planar organization of ependymal cilia, leading to defective cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and hydrocephalus (5). In humans, SNPs in the CELSR2 gene cluster on chromosome 1 have been associated with enhanced risk of coronary artery disease (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The progression of progenitor cells towards neuronal differentiation is regulated by cell cycle control and the transition from proliferative to neurogenic cell divisions. Cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation 1 (CEND1) is a neuronal protein widely expressed in the adult nervous system (1). It is implicated in the synchronization of cell cycle exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors in the developing nervous system, and its expression marks the exit of proliferative cells from the cell cycle (2,3). Levels of CEND1 expression in the subventricular zone of the adult nervous system are critical for cell cycle control and neuronal differentiation mechanisms during neonatal SVZ neurogenesis (4). It has recently been shown that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that overexpress CEND1 display increased neuronal differentiation in a mouse model of brain injury, suggesting its potential use as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4). Additional sequence divergence in the histone fold domain is responsible for correct targeting of CENP-A to the centromere (5). Many of the functions of CENP-A are regulated by phosphorylation (6,7). Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of CENP-A on Ser7 during prophase is required for proper targeting of Aurora B to the inner centromere in prometaphase, proper kinetochore/microtubule attachment and proper alignment of chromosomes during mitosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4). Additional sequence divergence in the histone fold domain is responsible for correct targeting of CENP-A to the centromere (5). Many of the functions of CENP-A are regulated by phosphorylation (6,7). Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of CENP-A on Ser7 during prophase is required for proper targeting of Aurora B to the inner centromere in prometaphase, proper kinetochore/microtubule attachment and proper alignment of chromosomes during mitosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E) is a kinesin-like motor protein and mitotic-checkpoint kinase BUB1B binding partner that is essential for establishing and maintaining stable attachments between mitotic chromosomes and spindle microtubules (1). CENP-E plays an important role as a motor protein in the alignment of chromosomes during prometaphase (2). Research studies indicate that CENP-E protein expression peaks in late G2 and M-phases of the cell cycle before the protein is degraded at mitotic exit (3). Additional studies show that the loss of CENP-E function results in cell cycle arrest in mitosis. Mutations in the corresponding CENPE gene can result in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly-13, a developmental disorder characterized by small head circumference, dysmorphic facial features, short stature, and delayed psychomotor development (4). Since CENP-E is essential for mitotic progression and is required for cellular proliferation, it has become an interesting target for cancer therapy (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CENP-F (mitosin), is a kinetochore-associated protein whose expression and localization to chromatin is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with its highest expression in G2/M phases (1, 2). CENP-F is required for appropriate localization of other kinetocore-associated proteins, including CENP-E. CENP-F regulates kinetocore function and maintenance of the mitotic spindle checkpoint. Farnesylation of CENP-F is required for its localization and function (3). CENP-F also interacts with the mitochondrial protein, miro, to direct the distribution of mitochondria to daughter cells as they exit mitosis (4). Researchers have shown that CENP-F drives prostate tumor growth synergistically with FOXM1 in human and mouse (5), and that the gene for CENP-F is among those frequently amplified in hepatocellular, head and neck, and esophageal carcinomas (6-8). CENP-F expression has also been shown in research studies to be associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Kinetochores are mitotic structures that form on centromeres and attach to mitotic spindle microtubules. Kinetochore attachment to microtubules regulates chromosome segregation and progression through mitosis. Unattached kinetochores signal to the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) machinery, arresting cells in mitosis (1).CENP-I is a centromere protein associated with the inner kinetochore, and required for progression through mitosis and the appropriate localization of other kinetochore-associated and checkpoint proteins, including CENP-C, the RZZ complex, MAD1 and MAD2 (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 55 kDa centrosomal protein (CEP55) is a widely expressed centrosome and midbody-associated protein that regulates cytokinesis, including completion of the final step during cytokinesis known as abscission (1,2). CEP55 activity during abscission is negatively regulated by p53 through Polo-like kinase 1 (3,4). The breast and ovarian cancer DNA repair protein BRCA2 interacts with CEP55 and plays a regulatory role during abscission (5). Research studies demonstrate that CEP55 is also involved in the regulation of Akt signaling, autophagy, and may be a biomarker in human cancer (reviewed in 6). The correlated overexpression of CEP55, the transcription factor FoxM1, and the HELLS helicase is seen in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (7,8). Additional studies demonstrate that CEP55 expression regulates cell proliferation in gastric carcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ceruloplasmin is a copper-binding glycoprotein with ferroxidase activity. It oxidizes Fe2+ to Fe3+, facilitating iron transport across the cell membrane (1). Mutation in Ceruloplasmin causes aceruloplasminemia, an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by iron accumulation in the brain as well as visceral organs, resulting in retinal degeneration, diabetes mellitus and neurological disturbances (2,3). Ceruloplasmin level in serum has been explored as a diagnostic marker for Wilson disease and ischemic heart disease (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CFTR (ABC35, ABCC7, CBAVD, CF, dj760C5.1, MRP7, TNR-CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Mutations in ABC genes have been linked to many diseases. CFTR is a plasma membrane cyclic AMP activated chloride channel that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the lung and several other organs (1,2). It mediates the secretion of Cl- and also regulates several channels including the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), K+ channels , ATP release mechanisms, anion exchangers, sodium bicarbonate transporters and aquaporin water channels (3,4,5,6,7,8 9,10). Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis, a disease that is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, increase in sweat gland NaCl, male infertility and airway disease (1,2,11). Intracellular trafficking regulates the number of CFTR molecules at the cell surface, which in part regulates Cl- secretion. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (deltaF508) is the most common mutation in CF patients. This mutation results in retention in the ER, where ER quality control mechanisms target the deltaF508 mutant to the proteosome for degradation (12-14). Therefore, disruption of CFTR trafficking leads to disregulation of Cl- secretion at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, MB21D1) is an antiviral enzyme that produces the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) in response to cytoplasmic DNA (1,2). The cGAS protein acts as a cytosolic DNA sensor that binds DNA and produces the cGAMP second messenger from ATP and GTP (1,2). cGAMP binds to and activates STING, a transmembrane adaptor protein that is a critical component of the cellular innate immune response to pathogenic cytoplasmic DNA (1-4). STING is ubiquitously expressed and found predominantly in the ER (3). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes (5). The TBK1 kinase phosphorylates and activates interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and NF-κB, which leads to the induction of type I interferon and other immune response genes (3-5).