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Product listing: FIH (D19B3) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9NWT6 #4426 to FoxM1 (D3F2B) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q08050 #20459

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FIH (Factor inhibiting HIF-1, HIF asparagine hydroxylase) is a dioxygen-dependent asparaginyl hydroxylase that modifies target protein function by hydroxylating target protein asparagine residues (1-3). Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a transcriptional activator involved in control of cell cycle in response to hypoxic conditions, is an important target for FIH regulation. FIH functions as an oxygen sensor that regulates HIF function by hydroxylating at Asn803 in the carboxy-terminal transactivation domain (CAD) of HIF (4,5). During normoxia, FIH uses cellular oxygen to hydroxylate HIF-1 and prevent interaction of HIF-1 with transcriptional coactivators, including the CBP/p300-interacting transactivator. Under hypoxic conditions, FIH remains inactive and does not inhibit HIF, allowing the activator to regulate transcription of genes in response to low oxygen conditions (4-6). FIH activity is regulated in through interaction with proteins, including Siah-1, which targets FIH for proteasomal degradation (7). The Cut-like homeodomain protein CDP can bind the FIH promoter region to regulate FIH expression at the transcriptional level (8). Phosphorylation of HIF at Thr796 also can prevent FIH hydroxylation on Asn803 (9). Potential FIH substrates also include proteins with ankyrin repeat domains, such as Iκ-B, Notch, and ASB4 (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Filamins are a family of dimeric actin binding proteins that function as structural components of cell adhesion sites. They also serve as a scaffold for subcellular targeting of signaling molecules (1). The actin binding domain (α-actinin domain) located at the amino terminus is followed by as many as 24 tandem repeats of about 96 residues and the dimerization domain is located at the carboxy terminus. In addition to actin filaments, filamins associate with other structural and signaling molecules such as β-integrins, Rho/Rac/Cdc42, PKC and the insulin receptor, primarily through the carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (1-3). Filamin A, the most abundant, and filamin B are widely expressed isoforms, while filamin C is predominantly expressed in muscle (1). Filamin A is phosphorylated by PAK1 at Ser2152, which is required for PAK1-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Filamins are a family of dimeric actin binding proteins that function as structural components of cell adhesion sites. They also serve as a scaffold for subcellular targeting of signaling molecules (1). The actin binding domain (α-actinin domain) located at the amino terminus is followed by as many as 24 tandem repeats of about 96 residues and the dimerization domain is located at the carboxy terminus. In addition to actin filaments, filamins associate with other structural and signaling molecules such as β-integrins, Rho/Rac/Cdc42, PKC and the insulin receptor, primarily through the carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (1-3). Filamin A, the most abundant, and filamin B are widely expressed isoforms, while filamin C is predominantly expressed in muscle (1). Filamin A is phosphorylated by PAK1 at Ser2152, which is required for PAK1-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FIP200 (FAK family kinase-interacting protein of 200 kDa) was identified in a two-hybrid screen with the tyrosine kinase Pyk2 and can inhibit Pyk2 kinase activity as well as related family members (1). FIP200 was later independently identified in a multi-drug resistance screen and named RB1CC1 (RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1) due to its induction by cytotoxic stress and RB1 expression regulation (2). FIP200 function has been linked to apoptosis, cell cycle progression, cell growth, and migration (reviewed in 3). FIP200 has also recently been shown to interact with ULK1 and is required for autophagosome formation (4). FIP200 is part of an ULK1 complex along with Atg13 that is regulated by mTOR and is required for starvation induced autophagy (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51, also called FKBP5) belongs to the FKBP family of immunophilins (1). FKBP family proteins contain FK domains and TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains. The FK domains are responsible for PPIase (peptidylprolyl isomerase) acitivity and allow binding to FK506 and rapamycin (2,3). The C terminal TPR domains are involved in protein-protein interactions. The TPR domain of FKBP5 mediates binding to HSP90 complexes (4), as well as glucocorticoid, androgen, and progesterone receptors, which account for its regulatory role in steroid hormone receptor function (5). FKBP5 also binds to IKKα and is involved in NF-κB signaling (6,7). In addition, FKBP5 was identified as a negative regulator of Akt, through promotion of Akt - PHLPP interaction and enhanced dephosphorylation of Akt (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein folliculin (FLCN) is encoded by the BHD (Birt-Hogg-Dube) gene that is altered in BHD Syndrome, a disorder characterized by the presence of benign connective tissue tumors known as fibrofolliculomas, renal tumors and lung cysts (1). Clinical similarities between BHD and hamartoma-producing disorders caused by Tsc2, PTEN and LKB1 gene mutations indicate that FLCN might also be important in nutrient and energy sensing through the mTOR pathway (2). This model is supported by studies demonstrating a direct correlation between the down regulation of BHD and a reduction in mTOR associated phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (3). Mutation of either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene results in elevated mTOR activity (4) while deletion of the Tsc2 and BHD homologs in yeast have opposing effects on both mTOR signaling and amino acid homeostasis (5). BHD knock-out mice develop cysts and renal cell tumors similar to those found in BHD patients along with low levels of phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (3). Based on these finding, it appears that either abnormally high or abnormally low levels of mTOR signaling might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Friend leukemia integration 1 (FLI1) transcription factor is an ETS domain-containing transcription factor that plays an important and highly conserved role in vertebrate development, particularly hematopoiesis, where it functions to activate transcription of genes that promote erythroblast proliferation (1-4). In mice, the Fli1 locus is a common retroviral insertion site for the Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV), such that a majority of F-MuLV-induced erythroleukemias are associated with aberrant Fli1 expression (5). Notably in humans, aberrant FLI1 expression has also been linked to poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (6). Also in humans, a t(11;22)(q24;q12) chromosomal translocation has been described that generates a chimeric protein (EWS/FLI1) comprised of the amino-terminal transactivation domain of Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWS) and the carboxy-terminal ETS domain of FLI1 (7). The EWS/FLI1 fusion protein functions as a transcriptional activator that is reportedly responsible for >85% of the known cases of pediatric Ewing’s sarcoma, an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cellular FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein) is a regulator of apoptosis that has various names, such as c-FLIP (1), Casper (2), CLARP (3), FLAME (4), I-FLICE (5), MRIT (6), CASH (7), and Usurpin (8). FLIP is expressed as two alternative splice isoforms, FLIP short (FLIPS) and FLIP long (FLIPL). FLIPS contains two death effector domains (DEDs) like those found on the death receptor adaptor protein FADD and the pro-domain of caspase-8. FLIPL shares significant homology with caspase-8 (FLICE), and contains an additional death effector domain, but FLIPL lacks the catalytic active site of the caspases and does not have protease activity. Both FLIP isoforms have been reported to interact with FADD and pro-caspase-8. The role of FLIP in apoptosis is controversial as some research studies have reported it to be anti-apoptotic, while others claim that it is pro-apoptotic. Overexpression of FLIPL can lead to caspase-8 heterodimers that produce an active protease, resulting in apoptosis. However, at physiological levels, it is thought that the binding of FLIP to the DED of FADD results in inhibition of caspase-8 processing. Reduction of FLIP by siRNA or gene targeting sensitizes cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. FLIP has also been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis and is upregulated in some cancer types including Hodgkin's lymphoma and ovarian and colon carcinomas (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cellular FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein) is a regulator of apoptosis that has various names, such as c-FLIP (1), Casper (2), CLARP (3), FLAME (4), I-FLICE (5), MRIT (6), CASH (7), and Usurpin (8). FLIP is expressed as two alternative splice isoforms, FLIP short (FLIPS) and FLIP long (FLIPL). FLIPS contains two death effector domains (DEDs) like those found on the death receptor adaptor protein FADD and the pro-domain of caspase-8. FLIPL shares significant homology with caspase-8 (FLICE), and contains an additional death effector domain, but FLIPL lacks the catalytic active site of the caspases and does not have protease activity. Both FLIP isoforms have been reported to interact with FADD and pro-caspase-8. The role of FLIP in apoptosis is controversial as some research studies have reported it to be anti-apoptotic, while others claim that it is pro-apoptotic. Overexpression of FLIPL can lead to caspase-8 heterodimers that produce an active protease, resulting in apoptosis. However, at physiological levels, it is thought that the binding of FLIP to the DED of FADD results in inhibition of caspase-8 processing. Reduction of FLIP by siRNA or gene targeting sensitizes cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. FLIP has also been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis and is upregulated in some cancer types including Hodgkin's lymphoma and ovarian and colon carcinomas (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, also called Flk2), is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family, which includes c-Kit, PDGFR and M-CSF receptors. FLT3 is expressed on early hematopoietic progenitor cells and supports growth and differentiation within the hematopoietic system (1,2). FLT3 is activated after binding with its ligand FL, which results in a cascade of tyrosine autophosphorylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream targets (3). The p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, GRB2 and Shc are associated with FLT3 after FL stimulation (4-6). Tyr589/591 is located in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3 and may play an important role in regulation of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity. Somatic mutations of FLT3 consisting of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) occur in 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FLT3 (BV10A4H2) Mouse mAb #89334.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, also called Flk2), is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family, which includes c-Kit, PDGFR and M-CSF receptors. FLT3 is expressed on early hematopoietic progenitor cells and supports growth and differentiation within the hematopoietic system (1,2). FLT3 is activated after binding with its ligand FL, which results in a cascade of tyrosine autophosphorylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream targets (3). The p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, GRB2 and Shc are associated with FLT3 after FL stimulation (4-6). Tyr589/591 is located in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3 and may play an important role in regulation of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity. Somatic mutations of FLT3 consisting of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) occur in 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, also called Flk2), is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family, which includes c-Kit, PDGFR and M-CSF receptors. FLT3 is expressed on early hematopoietic progenitor cells and supports growth and differentiation within the hematopoietic system (1,2). FLT3 is activated after binding with its ligand FL, which results in a cascade of tyrosine autophosphorylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream targets (3). The p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, GRB2 and Shc are associated with FLT3 after FL stimulation (4-6). Tyr589/591 is located in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3 and may play an important role in regulation of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity. Somatic mutations of FLT3 consisting of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) occur in 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 700 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FLT3 (BV10A4H2) Mouse mAb #89334.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, also called Flk2), is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family, which includes c-Kit, PDGFR and M-CSF receptors. FLT3 is expressed on early hematopoietic progenitor cells and supports growth and differentiation within the hematopoietic system (1,2). FLT3 is activated after binding with its ligand FL, which results in a cascade of tyrosine autophosphorylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream targets (3). The p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, GRB2 and Shc are associated with FLT3 after FL stimulation (4-6). Tyr589/591 is located in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3 and may play an important role in regulation of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity. Somatic mutations of FLT3 consisting of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) occur in 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, also called Flk2), is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family, which includes c-Kit, PDGFR and M-CSF receptors. FLT3 is expressed on early hematopoietic progenitor cells and supports growth and differentiation within the hematopoietic system (1,2). FLT3 is activated after binding with its ligand FL, which results in a cascade of tyrosine autophosphorylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream targets (3). The p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, GRB2 and Shc are associated with FLT3 after FL stimulation (4-6). Tyr589/591 is located in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3 and may play an important role in regulation of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity. Somatic mutations of FLT3 consisting of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) occur in 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome, a frequent cause of inherited mental retardation, often results from expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the gene that encodes the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) (1). FMRP (also known as FMR1) and its two autosomal homologs (FXR1 and FXR2) all bind RNA and play a role in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of these related proteins can associate with one another as well as form homodimers (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). In Drosophila, dFMRP associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and coimmunoprecipitates with miRNA and siRNA. These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by a defect in RNAi-related pathways (5). In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins) are RNA-guided nuclease effectors that are utilized for precise genome editing in mammalian systems (1). Cpf1 (CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella) are members of the Class 2 CRISPR system (2). Class 2 CRISPR systems, such as the well characterized Cas9, rely on single-component effector proteins to mediate DNA interference (3). Cpf1 endonucleases, compared to Cas9 systems, have several unique features that increase the utility of CRISPR-based genome editing techniques: 1) Cpf1-mediated cleavage relies on a single and short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) without the requirement of a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), 2) Cpf1 utilizes T-Rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences rather than a G-Rich PAM, and 3) Cpf1 generates a staggered, rather than a blunt-ended, DNA double-stranded break (2). These features broaden the utility of using CRISPR-Cas systems for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications. Several Cpf1 bacterial orthologs have been characterized for CRISPR-mediated mammalian genome editing (2, 4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FNIP1 and FNIP2 were identified as proteins interacting with tumor suppressor folliculin (FLCN) (1-3). FNIP1 and FNIP2 directly associate with AMPK, which indicates that they play roles in the energy and nutrient sensing pathways (1, 2). Further studies show that the FLCN/FNIP2 complex functions as a GTPase-activating protein for Rag GTPase C and Rag GTPase D (4). FLCN/FNIP2 complex thus promotes the binding of mTORC1 to Rag heterodimers, leading to the mTORC1 activation (4). In addition, along with FLCN, both FNIP1 and FNIP2 contribute to kidney tumor suppression (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box protein A1 (FoxA1, HNF3α) is a transcription factor required for the development of endoderm-derived organs, such as liver, lung, and prostate (1). FoxA1 functions as a pioneer factor that is recruited primarily to the distant enhancers to change chromatin structure for transcription in a cell type-specific manner (2,3). The FoxA1 transcription factor is implicated in various diseases, playing a role in hormone-dependent disorders such as breast and prostate cancers (4). The treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients with IFN-β results in FoxA1-induced stimulation of a novel population of FoxA1(+) regulatory T-cells, suggesting a possible immunosuppressive role for FoxA1 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box protein A1 (FoxA1, HNF3α) is a transcription factor required for the development of endoderm-derived organs, such as liver, lung, and prostate (1). FoxA1 functions as a pioneer factor that is recruited primarily to the distant enhancers to change chromatin structure for transcription in a cell type-specific manner (2,3). The FoxA1 transcription factor is implicated in various diseases, playing a role in hormone-dependent disorders such as breast and prostate cancers (4). The treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients with IFN-β results in FoxA1-induced stimulation of a novel population of FoxA1(+) regulatory T-cells, suggesting a possible immunosuppressive role for FoxA1 (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box protein A2 (FoxA2, also known as hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β or HNF3β) is a transcription factor that plays an important role in hepatocyte function (1). FoxA2/HNF3β is required for the activation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression during fasting (1). Together with the PGC-1β coactivator, FoxA2/HNF3β stimulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and therefore increases fatty acid metabolism (2). FoxA2/HNF3β, along with PGC-1β, also activates the expression of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) and promotes VLDL secretion (2). In addition to its roles in metabolic syndromes, FoxA2/HNF3β is essential for development of the endoderm and midline structures in mouse embryos (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors defined by the presence of a winged helix DNA binding domain called a Forkhead box (1). In humans, there are over 40 known Fox protein family members, divided into 19 subfamilies, which have evolved to regulate gene transcription in diverse and highly specialized biological contexts throughout development (2). Mutations that disrupt the expression of Fox gene family members have consequently been implicated in a broad array of human disorders, including immunological dysfunction, infertility, speech/language disorders, and cancer (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors defined by the presence of a winged helix DNA binding domain called a Forkhead box (1). In humans, there are over 40 known Fox protein family members, divided into 19 subfamilies, which have evolved to regulate gene transcription in diverse and highly specialized biological contexts throughout development (2). Mutations that disrupt the expression of Fox gene family members have consequently been implicated in a broad array of human disorders, including immunological dysfunction, infertility, speech/language disorders, and cancer (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FoxD3 is a member of the Forkhead Box family and is characterized by a winged-helix DNA-binding structure and the important role it plays in embryonic development (1). This transcriptional regulator is required for the maintenance of pluripotency in the pre-implantation and peri-implantation stages of mouse embryonic development (2) and is also required for trophoblast formation (3). FoxD3 is required for the maintenance of the mammalian neural crest; FoxD3(-/-) mouse embryos fail around the time of implantation with loss of neural crest-derived structures (4). FoxD3 also forms a regulatory network with Oct-4 and NANOG to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FoxM1 (D3F2B) Rabbit mAb #20459.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).