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Product listing: GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 594 Conjugate), UniProt ID P14136 #8152 to Glut4 (1F8) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P14672 #2213

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb #3670.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescence of rat cells. The unconjugated antibody #3670 reacts with human, mouse and rat GFAP protein. CST expects that GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize GFAP in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GFAT1, glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase 1, is the rate-limiting enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (1). This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate and glutamine to glucosamine-6-phosphate and glutamate (2). The hexosamine biosynthesis pathway generates the building blocks for protein and lipid glycosylation (2). Furthermore, studies suggest that increased activity of this pathway is a contributing factor to hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance (1,2). GFAT1 is more active in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients (3). Transgenice mice overexpressing this enzyme in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue show an insulin resistance phenotype (4,5). GFAT2, an isoenzyme of GFAT1, was later identified (6, 7). Studies show that the regulation of GFAT2 is different from that of GFAT1, suggesting differential regulation of the hexosamine pathway in different tissues (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GFAT1, glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase 1, is the rate-limiting enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (1). This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate and glutamine to glucosamine-6-phosphate and glutamate (2). The hexosamine biosynthesis pathway generates the building blocks for protein and lipid glycosylation (2). Furthermore, studies suggest that increased activity of this pathway is a contributing factor to hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance (1,2). GFAT1 is more active in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients (3). Transgenice mice overexpressing this enzyme in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue show an insulin resistance phenotype (4,5). GFAT2, an isoenzyme of GFAT1, was later identified (6, 7). Studies show that the regulation of GFAT2 is different from that of GFAT1, suggesting differential regulation of the hexosamine pathway in different tissues (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GFI1b and its homolog GFI1 are transcriptional repressors and important regulators of erythroid and megakaryocytic development and differentiation (1,2). GFI1b negatively regulates transcription by recruiting chromatin regulatory proteins including CoREST, the histone demethylase LSD1 and HDACs 1 and 2, which associate with GFI1b via its SNAG repression domain (3). GFI1b has also been shown to control the differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic progenitors by regulating TGF-β signaling at the bipotent progenitor stage (4). Inactivation of GFI1b in mice leads to embryonic lethality due to failure to produce functional erythrocytes and megakaryocytes (2). The GFI1b gene locus can be autoregulated by binding to its own promoter in hematopoietic cells, likely through interacting with GATA-1, another transcription factor essential for erythroid and megakaryocytic development (5). Mutations in GFI1b are implicated in various leukemias (6) and GFI1b has been found in a complex with GATA-1 and SUZ12 on repressed genes in erythroleukemia cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$348
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$348
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GGA3 is a member of the GGA family of proteins which also includes GGA1 and GGA2. These proteins consist of four distinct segments: a VHS domain that binds the di-leucine sorting signal DXXLL; a GAT domain that binds Arf-GTP; a hinge region that recruits clathrin; and a GAE domain that has sequence similarity to γ-adaptin and recruits a number of proteins. Arf1-GTPase recruits GGA3 to the trans-Golgi network. GGAs sort acid hydrolases to the lysosome and are involved in transporting proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to the endosome (1). During apoptosis or cerebral ischemia, GGA3 is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp313, reducing GGA3 levels and lysosomal degradation of β-secretase (BACE). The resulting elevated amount and activity of BACE plays a role in amyloid-β (Aβ) production, consistent with BACE elevation and Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer’s Disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Ghrelin, also known as appetite-regulating hormone, is a neuropeptide hormone belonging to the motilin family. It is the ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1 (GHS-R), expressed by cells in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus and arcuate nucleus (1). Ghrelin is synthesized as a preprohormone by ghrelinergic cells in the gastrointestinal tract; proteolytic cleavage yields a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, which undergoes obligate n-octanoylation at serine 3 by the enzyme ghrelin O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) (2). Binding of n-octanoyl ghrelin to GHS-R stimulates growth hormone release, while simultaneously exerting multiple neuroendocrine affects that influence appetite, gastric motility and energy balance (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GIRK2 is a member of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel family proteins (GIRKs). GIRK family proteins allow potassium to flow into the cell and therefore control cellular excitability in the central nervous system, heart, and pancreas (1-4). Activation of most GIRK channels requires heterologous subunit assembly and the presence of ATP (5-7). GIRK2 is abundantly expressed in the brain, where it is involved in pain perception. It is also required for peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia (8). Additionally GIRK2 localizes to pancreatic β cells and regulates insulin secretion (9,10). Mutations in the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2 are associated with Keppen-Lubinsky Syndrome, a rare disease characterized by severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GIRK2 is a member of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel family proteins (GIRKs). GIRK family proteins allow potassium to flow into the cell and therefore control cellular excitability in the central nervous system, heart, and pancreas (1-4). Activation of most GIRK channels requires heterologous subunit assembly and the presence of ATP (5-7). GIRK2 is abundantly expressed in the brain, where it is involved in pain perception. It is also required for peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia (8). Additionally GIRK2 localizes to pancreatic β cells and regulates insulin secretion (9,10). Mutations in the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2 are associated with Keppen-Lubinsky Syndrome, a rare disease characterized by severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are highly conserved, ubiquitous scaffold proteins involved in localized signaling to help regulate focal contact assembly and cytoskeletal dynamics. GIT proteins contain multiple interaction domains that allow interaction with small GTPases (including ARF, Rac, and cdc42), kinases (such as PAK and MEK), the Rho family GEF Pix, and the focal adhesion protein paxillin (reviewed in 1). GIT1 and GIT2 share many of the same properties, but with at least ten distinct, tissue-specific splice variants. GIT2 has been shown to play an important role inhibiting focal adhesion turnover and membrane protrusion (2,3). Focal adhesion localization and paxillin binding of GIT2 is regulated through phosphorylation at one or more tyrosine sites (Tyr286, Tyr392, Tyr592) by FAK and/or Src (4,5,reviewed in 6). Once at the focal adhesion, GIT2 is thought to play a key role in cell polarity and migration, making it a protein of interest in the investigation of oncogenic signaling pathways (3,5,7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNFRSF18, also known as glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor (TNFR)-related protein (GITR) and activation-inducible TNFR family receptor, encodes a type 1 membrane protein of the TNF-receptor superfamily (1). Three alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been reported (2). GITR is an immune cell co-stimulatory receptor expressed constitutively at high levels on CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs), at low levels on naive and memory T cells, and is induced upon T cell activation (3-5). Studies show GITR can also be induced on NK cells, macrophages, and DCs (3, 4, 6). Although GITR does not have intrinsic enzymatic activity, TNFSF18 (also known as GITRL) expressed on antigen presenting cells binds to GITR resulting in recruitment of TNFR-associated factor family members and activation of the NF-kappa-B pathway in T cells (7). GITR ligation has been shown to play a role in CD8+ T cell activation, cytoxicity, and memory T cell survival (8-10). In the thymus, GITR is thought to play a key role in dominant immunological self-tolerance through thymic Treg differentiation and expansion (11). Of note, GITR ligation inhibits Treg suppressive function (12-13) and promotes effector T cell resistance to Treg suppression (14-15). Due to the combined effects on both Treg suppression and effector cell activation, GITR represents a unique opportunity for immunotherapeutic intervention in cancer (16).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: TNFRSF18, also known as glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor (TNFR)-related protein (GITR) and activation-inducible TNFR family receptor, encodes a type 1 membrane protein of the TNF-receptor superfamily (1). Three alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been reported (2). GITR is an immune cell co-stimulatory receptor expressed constitutively at high levels on CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs), at low levels on naive and memory T cells, and is induced upon T cell activation (3-5). Studies show GITR can also be induced on NK cells, macrophages, and DCs (3, 4, 6). Although GITR does not have intrinsic enzymatic activity, TNFSF18 (also known as GITRL) expressed on antigen presenting cells binds to GITR resulting in recruitment of TNFR-associated factor family members and activation of the NF-kappa-B pathway in T cells (7). GITR ligation has been shown to play a role in CD8+ T cell activation, cytoxicity, and memory T cell survival (8-10). In the thymus, GITR is thought to play a key role in dominant immunological self-tolerance through thymic Treg differentiation and expansion (11). Of note, GITR ligation inhibits Treg suppressive function (12-13) and promotes effector T cell resistance to Treg suppression (14-15). Due to the combined effects on both Treg suppression and effector cell activation, GITR represents a unique opportunity for immunotherapeutic intervention in cancer (16).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GLI was first identified as a gene amplified in a malignant glioma (1) capable of transforming primary cells in cooperation with adenovirus E1A (2). GLI belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger proteins that includes three mammalian GLI proteins: GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 (3). These GLI proteins are similar to the Drosophila homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and function as transcription factors activated by the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in animal development, and research studies have shown that this pathway is aberrantly activated in many types of cancers (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Glucocorticoid Receptor (D6H2L) XP® Rabbit mAb #12041.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Glucocorticoid Receptor (D8H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #3660.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Glucocorticoid Receptor (D8H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #3660.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$348
50 assays
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Glucocorticoid Receptor (D8H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #3660.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also known as glutamine synthetase (GS), catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. GLUL is ubiquitously expressed with particularly high expression in the muscle, liver, and brain (1). GLUL expression is elevated in various cancers. Its expression is upregulated by oncogenic c-Myc (2). High expression of GLUL in breast cancer patients is associated with larger tumor size and high level of HER2 expression. It is a predictor of poor survival in patients with glioma and liver cancers (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also known as glutamine synthetase (GS), catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. GLUL is ubiquitously expressed with particularly high expression in the muscle, liver, and brain (1). GLUL expression is elevated in various cancers. Its expression is upregulated by oncogenic c-Myc (2). High expression of GLUL in breast cancer patients is associated with larger tumor size and high level of HER2 expression. It is a predictor of poor survival in patients with glioma and liver cancers (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, SLC2A1) is a widely expressed transport protein that displays a broad range of substrate specificity in transporting a number of different aldose sugars as well as an oxidized form of vitamin C into cells (1,2). Glut1 is responsible for the basal-level uptake of glucose from the blood through facilitated diffusion (2). Research studies show that Glut1 and the transcription factor HIF-1α mediate the regulation of glycolysis by O-GlcNAcylation in cancer cells (3). Additional studies demonstrate that Glut1 is required for CD4 T cell activation and is critical for the expansion and survival of T effector (Teff) cells (4). Mutations in the corresponding SLC2A1 gene cause GLUT1 deficiency syndromes (GLUT1DS1, GLUT1DS2), a pair of neurologic disorders characterized by delayed development, seizures, spasticity, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, and acquired microcephaly (5,6). Two other neurologic disorders - dystonia-9 (DYT9) and susceptibility to idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12 (EIG12) - are also caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A group of related glucose transporters (Glut1-5 and 7) mediate the facilitated diffusion of glucose in nonepithelial mammalian tissues. Within insulin-responsive tissues such as muscle and fat, Glut1 contributes to basal glucose uptake while Glut4 is responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose transport (1-3). Glut4 is a 12-transmembrane domain protein that facilitates glucose transport in the direction of the glucose gradient. This transporter localizes to intracellular organelles (endosomes) in unstimulated cells and translocates to the cell surface following insulin stimulation (1,2,4). Translocation of Glut4 is dependent on Akt, which may act by phosphorylating AS160, a RabGAP protein involved in membrane trafficking (5).