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Product listing: Histone H3 (D1H2) XP® Rabbit mAb (Pacific Blue™ Conjugate), UniProt ID P68431 #12167 to HNF1α (E3H9V) Rabbit mAb (IF Specific), UniProt ID P20823 #25401

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Histone H3 (D1H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #4499.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Histone H3 (D1H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #4499.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
$695
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$293
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brainstem astrocyte tumor arising mostly in children, leading to a long-term survival rate of less than 10%. Multiple whole-genome sequencing studies of DIPG patients identified commonly occurring mutations in the H3F3A gene encoding histone H3.3. One of these mutations, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution (K27M), is found in up to 78% of DIPGs and 22% of non-brainstem pediatric gliomas (1-3). This mutation is associated with poor prognosis, with a mean survival time of 0.73 years for patients with the K27M mutation versus 4.6 years for patients without the mutation (1-3). Expression of the K27M mutant histone H3 is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (4-6).

$260
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CENP-A is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin. The inherited localization of the centromere is specified by CENP-A (1). CENP-A deposition to the correct chromosomal location in early G1 phase is regulated by the Mis18 complex, which recruits the CENP-A assembly factor/chaperone protein HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) (2-3).Dimerization of HJURP is required for its activity (4), and phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinases is required for temporal regulation of HJURP recruitment (5).Overexpression of HJURP causes chromosome loss in yeast and mitotic defects in mammalian cells (6). Further, downregulation of HJURP expression has been associated with replicative senescence in human cells (7).Research studies indicate that HJURP may have prognostic value in human breast cancer and high grade gliomas (8-10).

$299
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a gene complex encoding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in humans. These cell surface proteins are responsible for the regulation of antigen-specific immunity in humans. HLA genes are highly polymorphic, allowing them to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class I (HLA-A, B, and C) present small peptide antigens from inside the cell, approximately 8 to 10 amino acids in length, to CD8+ T lymphocytes in order to activate a cytotoxic T cell response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class II (HLA-DP, DM, DO, DQ, and DR) present antigens from outside of the cell, approximately 15 to 24 residues in length, to CD4+ T-helper cells, which in turn secrete cytokines and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies to that specific antigen. HLAs corresponding to MHC class III encode components of the complement system (1,2).

$139
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to FITC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a gene complex encoding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in humans. These cell surface proteins are responsible for the regulation of antigen-specific immunity in humans. HLA genes are highly polymorphic, allowing them to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class I (HLA-A, B, and C) present small peptide antigens from inside the cell, approximately 8 to 10 amino acids in length, to CD8+ T lymphocytes in order to activate a cytotoxic T cell response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class II (HLA-DP, DM, DO, DQ, and DR) present antigens from outside of the cell, approximately 15 to 24 residues in length, to CD4+ T-helper cells, which in turn secrete cytokines and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies to that specific antigen. HLAs corresponding to MHC class III encode components of the complement system (1,2).

$159
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a gene complex encoding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in humans. These cell surface proteins are responsible for the regulation of antigen-specific immunity in humans. HLA genes are highly polymorphic, allowing them to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class I (HLA-A, B, and C) present small peptide antigens from inside the cell, approximately 8 to 10 amino acids in length, to CD8+ T lymphocytes in order to activate a cytotoxic T cell response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class II (HLA-DP, DM, DO, DQ, and DR) present antigens from outside of the cell, approximately 15 to 24 residues in length, to CD4+ T-helper cells, which in turn secrete cytokines and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies to that specific antigen. HLAs corresponding to MHC class III encode components of the complement system (1,2).

$309
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a gene complex encoding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in humans. These cell surface proteins are responsible for the regulation of antigen-specific immunity in humans. HLA genes are highly polymorphic, allowing them to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class I (HLA-A, B, and C) present small peptide antigens from inside the cell, approximately 8 to 10 amino acids in length, to CD8+ T lymphocytes in order to activate a cytotoxic T cell response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class II (HLA-DP, DM, DO, DQ, and DR) present antigens from outside of the cell, approximately 15 to 24 residues in length, to CD4+ T-helper cells, which in turn secrete cytokines and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies to that specific antigen. HLAs corresponding to MHC class III encode components of the complement system (1,2).

$249
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to redFluor™ 710 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a gene complex encoding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in humans. These cell surface proteins are responsible for the regulation of antigen-specific immunity in humans. HLA genes are highly polymorphic, allowing them to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class I (HLA-A, B, and C) present small peptide antigens from inside the cell, approximately 8 to 10 amino acids in length, to CD8+ T lymphocytes in order to activate a cytotoxic T cell response. HLAs corresponding to MHC class II (HLA-DP, DM, DO, DQ, and DR) present antigens from outside of the cell, approximately 15 to 24 residues in length, to CD4+ T-helper cells, which in turn secrete cytokines and stimulate B cells to produce antibodies to that specific antigen. HLAs corresponding to MHC class III encode components of the complement system (1,2).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HLA-G (HLA-G histocompatibility antigen, class I, G) is a non-classical MHC molecule expressed by trophoblasts in placenta, thymic epithelial cells, and some tumors. Alternative splicing leads to generation of at least six isoforms, four that are transmembrane proteins and two that are soluble (1-4). It is an inhibitory molecule involved in immune tolerance and escape, originally studied for its role in maternal tolerance of the fetus during pregnancy (1-5). HLA-G binds ILT2, ILT4, and KIR2DL4, playing a role in the regulation of natural killer, T, and monocyte/macrophage cells (4-5). Its involvement in evasion of immune response makes it a potential target for immunotherapy (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HMGA1, formerly known as HMG-I/Y, belongs to a family of high mobility group proteins that contain an AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA1 is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in embryonic stem cells, but not in fully differentiated adult tissues (2-4). Research studies have shown that HMGA1 is over-expressed in rapidly dividing neoplastic cells and a wide variety of aggressive cancers, including thyroid, colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate (2-4). Investigators have shown that forced expression of HMGA1 induces cellular transformation and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), while inhibition of HMGA1 expression blocks anchorage-independent cell growth and proliferation of cancer cells, suggesting that HMGA1 contributes to carcinogenesis by inducing and maintaining a de-differentiated, highly proliferative cell state (5-8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HMGA1, formerly known as HMG-I/Y, belongs to a family of high mobility group proteins that contain an AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA1 is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in embryonic stem cells, but not in fully differentiated adult tissues (2-4). Research studies have shown that HMGA1 is over-expressed in rapidly dividing neoplastic cells and a wide variety of aggressive cancers, including thyroid, colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate (2-4). Investigators have shown that forced expression of HMGA1 induces cellular transformation and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), while inhibition of HMGA1 expression blocks anchorage-independent cell growth and proliferation of cancer cells, suggesting that HMGA1 contributes to carcinogenesis by inducing and maintaining a de-differentiated, highly proliferative cell state (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HMGA2 belongs to the family of high mobility group with AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA2 is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed and plays a crucial role during embryonic development (3). HMGA2 promotes stem cell self-renewal and research studies have shown that decreased HMGA2 expression is associated with stem cell aging (4-7). Investigators have shown that expression levels of HMGA2 are very low in normal adult tissues, while either overexpression or rearrangement is associated with many types of cancer (8-11).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HMGB1 (D3E5) Rabbit mAb #6893.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B2 (HMGB2) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but it is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 and HMGB2 facilitate the binding of Hox proteins, Oct proteins, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). Furthermore, HMGB2 interacts with RAG1 to facilitate RAG complex binding to the recombinant signal sequence (RSS) and stimulate DNA-bending and subsequent VDJ cleavage at antigen receptor genes (5,6). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation. HMGB2 is secreted by myeloid cells and promotes proliferation and migration of endothelial cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) (7). Research studies have shown that HMGB2 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival time (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytoplasmic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS1) catalyzes the first committed step of mevalonate pathway essential for cholesterol biosynthesis (1). HMGCS1 transcription is regulated by sterol levels (2). Studies showed that miR-223 reduces cholesterol biosynthesis by inhibiting HMGCS1 and methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (3). In addition, activation of the EGFR family member ERBB4 induces the expression of SREBP-regulated genes (including HMGCS1) involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, suggesting a role of this enzyme in the metabolic re-programming in ERBB4-driven cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytoplasmic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS1) catalyzes the first committed step of mevalonate pathway essential for cholesterol biosynthesis (1). HMGCS1 transcription is regulated by sterol levels (2). Studies showed that miR-223 reduces cholesterol biosynthesis by inhibiting HMGCS1 and methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (3). In addition, activation of the EGFR family member ERBB4 induces the expression of SREBP-regulated genes (including HMGCS1) involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, suggesting a role of this enzyme in the metabolic re-programming in ERBB4-driven cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS2) generates hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) from acetyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA, a rate-limiting step in ketogenesis (1). Starvation or a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet increases the levels of hepatic FGF21, which in turn up-regulates HMGCS2 expression (2). Furthermore, mTORC1 inhibition was shown to be required for the increase of HMGCS2 expression mediated by PPARα in response to fasting (3). In addition, studies on mice lacking HMGCS2 suggest that ketogenesis plays a role in the prevention of diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS2) generates hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) from acetyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA, a rate-limiting step in ketogenesis (1). Starvation or a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet increases the levels of hepatic FGF21, which in turn up-regulates HMGCS2 expression (2). Furthermore, mTORC1 inhibition was shown to be required for the increase of HMGCS2 expression mediated by PPARα in response to fasting (3). In addition, studies on mice lacking HMGCS2 suggest that ketogenesis plays a role in the prevention of diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heme oxygenases (HMOX or HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of the oxidative degradation of heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin (1). Biliverdin is then converted to bilirubin (2). Heme is a strong pro-oxidant whereas bilirubin is a strong antioxidant (2). Research studies suggest disregulation of heme oxygenases may contribute to oxidative stress-related diseases (2). There are three isozymes of heme oxygenases: HMOX1/HO-1, HMOX2/HO-2, and HMOX3/HO-3 (1,2). HMOX1/HO-1 is inducible by heme and other stress stimuli (1,3). HMOX2/HO-2 and HMOX3/HO-3 are constitutively expressed (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α, also known as TCF1 or MODY3) is a transcription factor that plays a role in the tissue-specific regulation of liver gene expression (1). Research has shown that heterogeneous mutations of HNF1α are linked to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) (2). Recent studies indicate that increased concentrations of free fatty acids can reduce the expression of FoxA2/HNF3β and HNF1α in pancreatic β-cells and lead to their nuclear exclusion, resulting in symptoms of several metabolic syndromes (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α, also known as TCF1 or MODY3) is a transcription factor that plays a role in the tissue-specific regulation of liver gene expression (1). Research has shown that heterogeneous mutations of HNF1α are linked to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) (2). Recent studies indicate that increased concentrations of free fatty acids can reduce the expression of FoxA2/HNF3β and HNF1α in pancreatic β-cells and lead to their nuclear exclusion, resulting in symptoms of several metabolic syndromes (3).