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Product listing: c-IAP1 (D5G9) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q13490 #7065 to Cleaved Caspase-1 (Asp297) (D57A2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P29466 #4199

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Myc (D84C12) Rabbit mAb #5605.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Myc (D84C12) Rabbit mAb #5605.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody c-Myc (D84C12) Rabbit mAb #5605.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Myc (D84C12) Rabbit mAb #5605.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Myc (D3N8F) Rabbit mAb #13987.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspases are a family of aspartate-specific cysteine-dependent proteases that play a critical role in apoptosis as well as inflammatory responses. Pro-inflammatory caspases include caspase-1 and mouse caspase-11 (1). Caspase-11 has about 60% and 55% identity to human caspases-4 and -5, respectively. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1β and IL-18 into their mature forms (2). It is activated by proteolytic cleavage producing a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Canonical activation of caspase-1 occurs through several complex molecular platforms designated “inflammasomes” that include Pycard/Asc, nucleotide-binding oligomerization receptors (NLRs), and AIM2 (3, 4). Non-canonical activation of caspase-1 is triggered by caspase-11, which is transcriptionally induced by toll-like receptor ligands including LPS. Activation of this pathway induces inflammatory cytokines as well as pyroptosis, a form of programmed cell death (5-9). Pyroptosis may be specific for caspase-11, rather than caspase-1, suggesting a unique mechanism for protease.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-2 (Nedd2/ICH-1) is a Class I caspase with a long prodomain necessary for nuclear localization. Upon activation of the apoptotic pathway, the procaspase is cleaved at Asp316, producing a 14 kDa fragment and a 32 kDa prodomain/large subunit. Subsequent processing at Asp152 and Asp330 produces an 18 kDa large subunit and a 12 kDa small fragment (1). Caspase-2 is the nuclear apoptotic respondent to cellular genotoxic stress or mitotic catastrophe. Activation occurs upon recruitment to a complex containing a p53-induced death domain protein, PIDD (2). This suggests caspase-2 can be a nuclear initiator caspase with a requirement for caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation in downstream apoptotic events (3, 4). In apoptotic pathways resulting from UV-induced DNA damage, processing of caspase-2 occurs downstream of mitochondrial dysfunction and of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation, extending a possible role for caspase-2 as a parallel effector caspase (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$122
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Caspase-3 (8G10) Rabbit mAb #9665.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-5 (Ich-3/ICErelIII/TY) is a member of the caspase family of cysteine proteases that play a key role in the execution of apoptosis and activation of inflammatory cytokines (1-3). Caspase-5 is widely expressed, with highest expression observed in placenta and lung (1). Interferon-γ and LPS regulate expression of caspase-5 (2,4). Members of the caspase-1 subfamily of caspases, which includes caspase-4, -5, and murine caspase-11 and -12, can induce apoptosis when over-expressed and mediate the proteolytic activation of inflammatory cytokines (5). Processing of IL-1β occurs through the activation of an inflammasome complex consisting of caspase-1, caspase-5, Pycard and NALP1 (6). Transcription factor Max, a component of the Myc/Mad/Max network, is cleaved by caspase-5 during Fas-induced apoptosis (7). Several alternative spliced variants of caspase-5 have been identified (8). Frameshift mutations of caspase-5 have been observed in leukemia, lymphoma (9), and colorectal cancers (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-7 (CMH-1, Mch3, ICE-LAP3) has been identified as a major contributor to the execution of apoptosis (1-4). Caspase-7, like caspase-3, is an effector caspase that is responsible for cleaving downstream substrates such as (ADP-ribose) polymerase and PARP (1,3). During apoptosis, caspase-7 is activated through proteolytic processing by upstream caspases at Asp23, Asp198, and Asp206 to produce the mature subunits (1,3). Similar to caspase-2 and -3, caspase-7 preferentially cleaves substrates following the recognition sequence DEVD (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-7 (CMH-1, Mch3, ICE-LAP3) has been identified as a major contributor to the execution of apoptosis (1-4). Caspase-7, like caspase-3, is an effector caspase that is responsible for cleaving downstream substrates such as (ADP-ribose) polymerase and PARP (1,3). During apoptosis, caspase-7 is activated through proteolytic processing by upstream caspases at Asp23, Asp198, and Asp206 to produce the mature subunits (1,3). Similar to caspase-2 and -3, caspase-7 preferentially cleaves substrates following the recognition sequence DEVD (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
200 µl
$630
600 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis induced through the CD95 receptor (Fas/APO-1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) activates caspase-8 and leads to the release of the caspase-8 active fragments, p18 and p10 (1-3). Activated caspase-8 cleaves and activates downstream effector caspases such as caspase-1, -3, -6, and -7. Caspase-3 ultimately elicits the morphological hallmarks of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation and cell shrinkage.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis induced through the CD95 receptor (Fas/APO-1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) activates caspase-8 and leads to the release of the caspase-8 active fragments, p18 and p10 (1-3). Activated caspase-8 cleaves and activates downstream effector caspases such as caspase-1, -3, -6, and -7. Caspase-3 ultimately elicits the morphological hallmarks of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation and cell shrinkage.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-9 (ICE-LAP6, Mch6) is an important member of the cysteine aspartic acid protease (caspase) family (1,2). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with the 47 kDa procaspase-9/Apaf-1. Apaf-1 mediated activation of caspase-9 involves intrinsic proteolytic processing resulting in cleavage at Asp315 and producing a p35 subunit. Another cleavage occurs at Asp330 producing a p37 subunit that can serve to amplify the apoptotic response (3-6). Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other caspase members, including caspase-3 and caspase-7, to initiate a caspase cascade, which leads to apoptosis (7-10).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cathepsin B (D1C7Y) XP® Rabbit mAb #31718.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cathepsin B (D1C7Y) XP® Rabbit mAb #31718.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CHOP (L63F7) Mouse mAb #2895.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CHOP was identified as a C/EBP-homologous protein that inhibits C/EBP and LAP in a dominant-negative manner (1). CHOP expression is induced by certain cellular stresses including starvation and the induced CHOP suppresses cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase (2). Later it was shown that, during ER stress, the level of CHOP expression is elevated and CHOP functions to mediate programmed cell death (3). Studies also found that CHOP mediates the activation of GADD34 and Ero1-Lα expression during ER stress. GADD34 in turn dephosphorylates phospho-Ser51 of eIF2α thereby stimulating protein synthesis. Ero1-Lα promotes oxidative stress inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (4). The role of CHOP in the programmed cell death of ER-stressed cells is correlated with its role promoting protein synthesis and oxidative stress inside the ER (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).