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Product listing: Lamin B1 (119D5-F1) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P20700 #68591 to PEA-15 (D1G6A) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q15121 #13091

$260
100 µg
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Lamin B1 (D9V6H) Rabbit mAb #13435.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Lamin B2 (E1S1Q) Rabbit mAb #13823.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins and lamin associated proteins are the major components of nuclear lamina found between the inner nuclear membrane and the peripheral chromatin. These proteins play important roles in maintaining nuclear structure, chromatin organization, DNA replication, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (1-3). Lamins are type V intermediate filaments that are further classified into type A and type B lamin proteins. Type A lamins (including lamin A and the smaller lamin C splice variant) are predominately expressed in terminally differentiated cells, whereas type B lamins (lamin B1, lamin B2) are encoded by distinct genes and are expressed constitutively. Cleavage of lamins by caspases occurs during apoptosis as part of the disassembly of the cell (4-6). A number of lamina-associated proteins contribute to the nuclear lamina and include the lamin B receptor, LAP1, LAP2, emerin, MAN1, otefin, and YA. Several isoforms of lamina-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2, also known as thymopoietin or TMPO) have been described, with the α, β, and γ isoforms most abundant in humans (7-10). Structurally similar LAP2β and LAP2γ are type II integral membrane proteins. LAP2α has a unique carboxy-terminus that lacks a transmembrane region and results in localization of LAP2α throughout the nucleus where it can associate with lamin A/C (10). LAP2α is also thought to contribute to the nuclear anchorage of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and control cell cycle progression (11). LAP2α is also targeted for cleavage by caspases, which may contribute to changes in chromatin structure during apoptosis (12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Mcl-1 (D2W9E) Rabbit mAb #94296.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Mcl-1 (D2W9E) Rabbit mAb #94296.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Mcl-1 (D2W9E) Rabbit mAb #94296.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MFF (E5W4M) XP® Rabbit mAb #84580.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (1-4). Research studies have also shown that MFF is a peroxisomal membrane protein and participates in peroxisome fission by serving as a receptor for another GTPase, dynamin-like protein 1 (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MFF (E5W4M) XP® Rabbit mAb #84580.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (1-4). Research studies have also shown that MFF is a peroxisomal membrane protein and participates in peroxisome fission by serving as a receptor for another GTPase, dynamin-like protein 1 (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (1-4). Research studies have also shown that MFF is a peroxisomal membrane protein and participates in peroxisome fission by serving as a receptor for another GTPase, dynamin-like protein 1 (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (1,2). The process is negatively regulated by caspases and is initiated through a complex containing the RIP1 and RIP3 kinases, typically referred to as the necrosome. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (3,4). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (3). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (3-5). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (1,2). The process is negatively regulated by caspases and is initiated through a complex containing the RIP1 and RIP3 kinases, typically referred to as the necrosome. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (3,4). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (3). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (3-5). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Max-like protein X (MLX), also known as transcription factor-like protein 4 (TCFL4), is a member of the Myc/Max/Mad network of transcriptional regulator proteins that share a common basic-helix-loop-helix zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding (1,2). MLX is ubiquitously expressed in most cell lines and functions as a binding partner for MLXIP (also known as MondoA) and MLXIPL (also known as ChREBP) (1,2). MLX/MLXIP and MLX/MLXIPL heterodimers function to regulate glucose homeostasis by sensing glucose metabolites in the cell. These heterodimeric protein complexes reside mainly in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of cells grown in low glucose, and translocate to the nucleus upon increased intracellular glucose levels to activate transcription of downstream target genes (1,2). MLX/MLXIP is required for the deregulated Myc-induced reprogramming of multiple metabolic pathways during oncogenesis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian sterile-20-like (MST) kinases are upstream regulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement (1). This family of serine/threonine kinases includes MST1 (STK4) and MST2 (STK3), two functionally related proteins with conserved amino-terminal kinase domains and carboxy-terminal regulatory domains that contain nuclear export signals (1-3). During apoptosis, caspase-mediated cleavage of MST1/2 removes the inhibitory regulatory domain, triggering autophosphorylation and activation of the kinase domain, which is translocated to the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of the active kinase induces chromatin condensation and other events associated with apoptotic progression (4).Research studies indicate that MST1/2 are orthologous to Drosophila Hippo (Hpo), one of the core regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway. This evolutionarily conserved program controls tissue growth and organ size by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal. The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway involves a kinase cascade, where the MST1/2 kinases and the SAV1 scaffold protein form a complex that leads to phosphorylation and activation of LATS1/2. The LATS1/2 kinases phosphorylate YAP and TAZ, promoting cytoplasmic sequestration and inhibition of these transcription coactivators (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, Noxa) is a small protein that plays a key role in mediating apoptotic signaling. Noxa is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein that contains a single Bcl-2 homology (BH3) domain (1). Members of the “BH3-only” family (e.g. Noxa, Bad, Bim, Puma, Bid, Bik, and Hrk) are highly regulated proteins that induce apoptosis through BH3-dependent interaction with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (2). Noxa localizes to mitochondria and binds the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and A1/Bfl-1, but does not bind to Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL (3). The Noxa protein competes with Mcl-1 for binding to mitochondrial Bak protein. Noxa was originally identified as a phorbol ester inducible protein that is highly expressed in adult T-cell leukemia cell lines (4). Several different stimuli, including DNA damage, hypoxia, interferon, viral infection, and double-stranded RNA, induce Noxa expression in cells. Higher levels of Noxa protein are typically found hematopoietic cells (3,5,6).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb #9532.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PDCD4 (programmed cell death protein 4) was identified as a suppressor of neoplastic transformation (1). It interacts with eukaryotic initiation factors eIF4AI and eIF4AII (2). PDCD4 colocalizes with eIF4A in the cytoplasm and inhibits the activity of eIF4A as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase (2). PDCD4 inhibits cap-dependent translation (2). Upon stimulation by mitogens, PDCD4 is phosphorylated on Ser67 by S6K1 kinase and then degraded through the ubiquitin pathway leading to enhanced translation and cell growth (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PEA-15 is a 15 kDa phosphoprotein expressed abundantly in astrocytes and fibroblasts as well as in tissues, including the lung and eye (1). The protein has been shown to coordinate cell growth, death, and glucose utilization (2-4). The amino-terminal DED domain of PEA-15 mediates its binding to FADD or Erk and further regulates the Erk and apoptosis signaling pathways. PEA-15 can be phosphorylated at two serine residues, Ser104 and Ser116, located within the carboxy terminus. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates binding to Erk and FADD (2,3).