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Product listing: Na Channel β1 Subunit (D4Z2N) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q07699 #13950 to Neurofilament-L (DA2) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P07196 #2835

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (NCAM-L1/L1CAM) is a single pass transmembrane glycoprotein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, containing six amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains followed by five fibronectin type-III domains (1). NCAM-L1 is mainly expressed in the brain, and plays an important role in the developing nervous system, with involvement in neurite fasciculation and outgrowth, myelination, neuronal migration, and neuronal cell adhesion (2). Mutations in the NCAM-L1 gene cause varying degrees of neurological disease including X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA syndrome, spastic paraplegia type 1, and X-linked corpus callosum agenesis, together known as L1 syndrome (3). Apart from the nervous system, NCAM-L1 is overexpressed in many cancers and supports a poor prognosis by facilitating aggressive tumor growth, metastasis and chemoresistance (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (NCAM-L1/L1CAM) is a single pass transmembrane glycoprotein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, containing six amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains followed by five fibronectin type-III domains (1). NCAM-L1 is mainly expressed in the brain, and plays an important role in the developing nervous system, with involvement in neurite fasciculation and outgrowth, myelination, neuronal migration, and neuronal cell adhesion (2). Mutations in the NCAM-L1 gene cause varying degrees of neurological disease including X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA syndrome, spastic paraplegia type 1, and X-linked corpus callosum agenesis, together known as L1 syndrome (3). Apart from the nervous system, NCAM-L1 is overexpressed in many cancers and supports a poor prognosis by facilitating aggressive tumor growth, metastasis and chemoresistance (4,5).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: According to affinity and function, calcium-binding proteins are separated into two classes: calcium buffers and calcium sensors. Calmodulin is a well-studied calcium sensor with well-established roles in synaptic plasticity. Neuronal calcium-sensor 1 (NCS1) is also a member of the calcium sensor family, however, its role in synaptic plasticity remains under investigation. NCS1 contains multiple EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and an amino-terminal myristoyl group (1). NCS1 has a large number of binding partners. Most of these protein interactions are calcium-dependent (e.g. dopamine D2 receptor), although some are calcium-independent (e.g. IP3 receptor) (2). In murine dentate gyrus, NCS1 promotes synaptic plasticity and rapid acquisition of spatial memory (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neogenin is a member of the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) receptor family. It acts as an attractive axon guidance receptor in response to netrin, and as a repellent receptor when interacting with RGMa (1,2). Neogenin also regulates adhesion and tissue organization, such as bone formation, mammary gland morphogenesis, and skeletal myofiber development, by interacting with secreted netrins (3-5). In addition, neogenin is a key regulator of adult neurogenesis by synchronizing neuroblast migration and differentiation (6). Neogenin expression has been found to be associated with cellular phenotype in cancer. In breast cancer, neogenin expression is inversely correlated with cancer grade (7), while in gastric cancer, up regulation of neogenin was found to increase cell proliferation and motility (8).

$260
100 µg
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Nestin is an intermediate filament family member protein that is structurally related to the neurofilament proteins (1). It is highly expressed in the developing brain, where it may help to regulate cell structure and intracellular processes required for neural cell division and migration (1,2). Upon maturation of the brain, nestin expression is quickly down-regulated and replaced by expression of the neurofilament proteins (2). Because nestin is expressed in both mature and precursor neuronal and glial cells, as well as in the developing brain and in the brain and spinal cord following damage, nestin is widely accepted as a marker of neural stem/progenitor cells (3). Research studies have shown that expression of nestin is also found in cells from various nervous system tumors, including gliomas, neuroblastomas, astrocytomas, and it is generally accepted as a marker for neural cancer stem cells (3). However, nestin expression has also been observed in astrocytes, retina, cardiac muscle, pancreas, and other tissues (3). Therefore, the acceptance of nestin as an exclusive marker of neural stem/progenitor cells is not unanimous.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Nestin is an intermediate filament family member protein that is structurally related to the neurofilament proteins (1). It is highly expressed in the developing brain, where it may help to regulate cell structure and intracellular processes required for neural cell division and migration (1,2). Upon maturation of the brain, nestin expression is quickly down-regulated and replaced by expression of the neurofilament proteins (2). Because nestin is expressed in both mature and precursor neuronal and glial cells, as well as in the developing brain and in the brain and spinal cord following damage, nestin is widely accepted as a marker of neural stem/progenitor cells (3). Research studies have shown that expression of nestin is also found in cells from various nervous system tumors, including gliomas, neuroblastomas, astrocytomas, and it is generally accepted as a marker for neural cancer stem cells (3). However, nestin expression has also been observed in astrocytes, retina, cardiac muscle, pancreas, and other tissues (3). Therefore, the acceptance of nestin as an exclusive marker of neural stem/progenitor cells is not unanimous.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NeuroD is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. These proteins function by forming heterodimers with E-proteins and binding to the canonical E-box sequence CANNTG (1,2). Neuronal activity results in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of NeuroD at Ser336, which is necessary for formation and growth of dendrites (3,4). NeuroD is also phosphorylated at Ser274 though the results are context dependent as phosphorylation by Erk stimulates NeuroD activity in pancreatic β-cells while phosphorylation by GSK-3β inhibits NeuroD in neurons (3). NeuroD is crucially important in both the pancreas and developing nervous system, and plays a large role in the development of the inner ear and mammalian retina (3). Mice lacking NeuroD become severely diabetic and die shortly after birth due to defects in β-cell differentiation (2,3,5,6). The lack of NeuroD in the brain results in severe defects in development (5). Human mutations have been linked to a number of types of diabetes including type I diabetes mellitus and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NeuroD is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. These proteins function by forming heterodimers with E-proteins and binding to the canonical E-box sequence CANNTG (1,2). Neuronal activity results in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of NeuroD at Ser336, which is necessary for formation and growth of dendrites (3,4). NeuroD is also phosphorylated at Ser274 though the results are context dependent as phosphorylation by Erk stimulates NeuroD activity in pancreatic β-cells while phosphorylation by GSK-3β inhibits NeuroD in neurons (3). NeuroD is crucially important in both the pancreas and developing nervous system, and plays a large role in the development of the inner ear and mammalian retina (3). Mice lacking NeuroD become severely diabetic and die shortly after birth due to defects in β-cell differentiation (2,3,5,6). The lack of NeuroD in the brain results in severe defects in development (5). Human mutations have been linked to a number of types of diabetes including type I diabetes mellitus and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (1,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Myelinated axons contain un-myelinated gaps called nodes of Ranvier. These regularly spaced gaps are critical for the proper propagation and rapid conduction of nerve impulses in the central and peripheral nervous system (1). The structure and organization of the nodes of Ranvier is dictated by interaction between the axon and glial cells (2). Voltage-gated sodium channels concentrated at the nodes and potassium channels clustered at the paranodes are responsible for propagation of the action potentials (3,4). Other proteins that contribute to the architecture and function of the nodes of Ranvier include βIV spectrin (5), ankyrin-G (6), and the L1 cell adhesion molecules, neurofascin and NrCAM (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Myelinated axons contain un-myelinated gaps called nodes of Ranvier. These regularly spaced gaps are critical for the proper propagation and rapid conduction of nerve impulses in the central and peripheral nervous system (1). The structure and organization of the nodes of Ranvier is dictated by interaction between the axon and glial cells (2). Voltage-gated sodium channels concentrated at the nodes and potassium channels clustered at the paranodes are responsible for propagation of the action potentials (3,4). Other proteins that contribute to the architecture and function of the nodes of Ranvier include βIV spectrin (5), ankyrin-G (6), and the L1 cell adhesion molecules, neurofascin and NrCAM (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neurofibromin is a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (RasGAP), down-regulating Ras signaling (1). Studies have shown, that mutations in NF1 inhibit its activity, resulting in benign tumors such as neurofibromas, which may form along nerves throughout the body resulting in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (2). NF1 is one of the most common autosomal dominant diseases however it remains unclear how mutation of NF1 may lead to other features of NF1 (3). In addition, NF1 mutations occur in 5-10% of human sporadic malignancies such as glioblastomas, lung adenocarcinomas, melanomas, breast and ovarian cancers, and acute myeloid leukemias. Mutations in NF1 can cause resistance to therapies including chemotherapy and radiation therapy (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat brain. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Neurofilament-L (C28E10) Rabbit mAb #2837.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Neurofilaments are the major intermediate filaments found in neurons and consist of light (NFL), medium (NFM), and heavy (NFH) subunits (1). Similar in structure to other intermediate filament proteins, neurofilaments have a globular amino-terminal head, a central α-helical rod domain, and a carboxy-terminal tail. A heterotetrameric unit (NFL-NFM and NFL-NFH) forms a protofilament, with eight protofilaments comprising the typical 10 nm intermediate filament (2). While neurofilaments are critical for radial axon growth and determine axon caliber, microtubules are involved in axon elongation. PKA phosphorylates the head domain of NFL and NFM to inhibit neurofilament assembly (3,4). Research studies have shown neurofilament accumulations in many human neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (in Lewy bodies along with α-synuclein), Alzheimer's disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (1).