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Product listing: RanBP9 (D8M8D) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q96S59 #14638 to Synapsin-1 (D13C1) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P17600 #6710

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RanBP9 (RanBPM) is a Ran binding protein ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved in different organisms. It is a scaffolding protein that was identified as an interacting protein of MET inducing Ras- Erk activation (1). Several domains and motifs regulate the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of RanBP9 (2). Research studies indicate that RanBP9 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). In addition to elevated expression levels in AD samples, this may involve interaction of RanBP9 with APP and BACE1 promoting endocytosis of APP and increased BACE1 mediated cleavage of APP to generate β-amyloid peptides (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of about 40 proteins that determine the signaling amplitude and duration of G protein-coupled receptor signaling via modulation of the GTPase activity of G proteins (1-3). Each RGS has a distinct structure, expression pattern, and regulation, resulting in preferential interactions with receptors, G proteins, and other signaling proteins, as well as a unique function (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rhodopsin is the photoreceptor in the retinal rods. It is activated by photons, transduces visual information through its cognate G protein, transducin, and is inactivated by arrestin binding (1). Using atomic-force microscopy, rhodopsin was found to be arranged into paracrystalline arrays of dimers in mouse disc membranes (2). Rhodopsin is considered to be the prototype of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and is the first GPCR for which a crystal structure was solved (3). Research studies have linked mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin to retinitis pigmentosa (4,5), a disease characterized by retinal degeneration resulting in reduced peripheral vision and night blindness (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Rhodopsin is the photoreceptor in the retinal rods. It is activated by photons, transduces visual information through its cognate G protein, transducin, and is inactivated by arrestin binding (1). Using atomic-force microscopy, rhodopsin was found to be arranged into paracrystalline arrays of dimers in mouse disc membranes (2). Rhodopsin is considered to be the prototype of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and is the first GPCR for which a crystal structure was solved (3). Research studies have linked mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin to retinitis pigmentosa (4,5), a disease characterized by retinal degeneration resulting in reduced peripheral vision and night blindness (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROBO2 is a member of the roundabout (ROBO) receptor family (1). The activation of ROBO2 by SLIT ligand regulates various biological processes, including promoting stem cell senescence via WNT inhibition, destabilizing podocyte actin polymerization and adhesion, and activation of Ena/VASP to facilitate tumor cell extrusion from epithelia (2-5). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance and synapse function, retinal neurovascular formation, and muscle patterning (6-9). Loss of function mutations of ROBO2 have been associated with urinary tract anomalies and vesicoureteral reflux (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102, DLG3) belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein family and is a homolog of the Drosophila disc large (dlg) tumor suppressor protein. SAP102 consists of three PDZ domains, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a guanylate kinase (GK) domain (1). The SAP102 protein is more highly expressed in nonproliferating cells than in proliferating cells, indicating a role in the negative regulation of cell growth. SAP102 interacts with the carboxy terminus of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein. Furthermore, SAP102 associates with PSD95 in the presence of calcium while the SH3 domain of SAP102 binds calmodulin (2,3). All three PDZ domains of SAP102 participate in binding to the NMDA receptor, interacting specifically with the carboxy-terminal domain of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B). This SAP102-NR2B interaction may facilitate AMPA receptor withdrawal from the postsynaptic membrane by inhibiting the Erk/MAPK pathway (1,4). Neuronal SAP102 is concentrated at dendritic shafts and spines, axons, and synaptic junctions. At excitatory synapses, SAP102 is involved in NMDA receptor clustering and immobilization and links NMDA receptors to the submembraneous cytomatrix (4). SAP102 and the NMDA receptor function together to mediate plasticity, behavior, and signal transduction (1). A nonsyndromic form of X-linked mental retardation is caused by loss-of-function mutations to the SAP102 gene. The SAP102 protein may be involved in autism since MAGUK proteins in the NMDA receptor complex bind directly to the autism susceptibility gene, neuroligin (1,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Semaphorins are a family of cell surface and secreted proteins initially recognized as axon guidance factors that control the development of the central nervous system (1). They are involved in cell migration, angiogenesis, and immune responses (2-6). Based on protein structure, there are eight classes of semaphorins. Class 3-7 semaphorins are expressed in vertebrates. Semaphorin 3 subfamily members are the only secreted semaphorins in vertebrates. There are seven semaphorin 3 proteins and their receptors include neuropilins and the type A/D family plexins (7-9).Semaphorin 3B functions as a tumor suppressor, as research studies have shown that it is deleted or inactivated in lung and breast cancer (10,11). Overexpression of semaphorin 3B inhibits tumor cell proliferation and causes apoptosis (12,13). Semaphorin 3B also inhibits angiogenesis (14). Semaphorin 3B loses its activity upon cleavage by furin-like pro-protein convertases (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serine racemase, also called SRR, is an enzyme that is highly expressed in the brain and converts L-serine to D-serine (1,2). D-serine is a co-agonist of the NMDA receptor. NMDA receptor activation requires the binding of glutamate to its GluN2 subunit and the concomitant binding of either glycine or D-serine to its glycine binding site on the GluN1 subunit (3). Decreased activation of NMDA receptors is a typical feature of impaired synaptic plasticity in age-related memory deficits. Therefore, D-serine availability makes serine racemase an important therapeutic target for memory deficit associated with nonpathological aging (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The SHANK family proteins, also known as proline-rich synapse-associated proteins, consist of SHANK1, SHANK2, and SHANK3. SHANK proteins act as scaffolds at the neuronal post-synaptic density (PSD) (1), where they play a critical role in PSD assembly of excitatory synapses during development (2). While recruitment of SHANK proteins to the synapse is independent of their interaction with Homer (3), proper synaptic targeting of SHANK1 is mediated by interactions between its PDZ domain and PSD proteins (4). At the synapse, SHANK proteins interact with NMDA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor complexes (5). Research studies have proposed the involvement of SHANK proteins in autism and neurodegenerative diseases (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone that forms raft-like microdomains on the ER, where it interacts with mitochondria at the mitochondria-associated ER membrane domain (MAM). At MAM, SIGMAR1 maintains proper ER-mitochondrion Ca2+ signaling, regulates mitochondria function, and enhances cellular survival upon ER stress (1-4). When activated, SIGMAR1 translocates to ER and plasma membrane, where it interacts with a plethora of membrane proteins, including ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, and kinases. SIGMAR1 also modulates a variety of neuronal functions, such as neuronal excitability, neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, and neurorestoration (5-7). SIGMAR1 binds to many anti-psychotic drugs and it is implicated in addiction, pain, neurodegenerative diseases, and depression (8-11). Recently, mutations in the SIGMAR1 gene have been reported to be associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (12,13). Besides its important roles in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, SIGMAR1 also enhances cancer cell migration and invasion (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone that forms raft-like microdomains on the ER, where it interacts with mitochondria at the mitochondria-associated ER membrane domain (MAM). At MAM, SIGMAR1 maintains proper ER-mitochondrion Ca2+ signaling, regulates mitochondria function, and enhances cellular survival upon ER stress (1-4). When activated, SIGMAR1 translocates to ER and plasma membrane, where it interacts with a plethora of membrane proteins, including ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, and kinases. SIGMAR1 also modulates a variety of neuronal functions, such as neuronal excitability, neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, and neurorestoration (5-7). SIGMAR1 binds to many anti-psychotic drugs and it is implicated in addiction, pain, neurodegenerative diseases, and depression (8-11). Recently, mutations in the SIGMAR1 gene have been reported to be associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (12,13). Besides its important roles in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, SIGMAR1 also enhances cancer cell migration and invasion (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SLIT2 is an extracellular matrix-associated SLIT family member that functions as a ligand for roundabout (ROBO) family receptors (1). Activation of ROBO receptors by SLIT2 regulates various biological processes, including promoting cellular senescence via WNT inhibition (2), suppressing migration by enhanced β-catenin/E-cadherin association, regulating actin polymerization (4, 5), and suppressing cell proliferation induced by SDF1 and MCP1 (6, 7). In development, the SLIT-ROBO pathways play important roles in neuronal axon guidance, angiogenesis, and both kidney and mammary gland organogenesis. SLIT2 expression has been reported to suppress cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, suggesting that modulation of SLIT2-ROBO signaling may have therapeutic potential in cancer biology (8, 9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2 and also known as STOML2) is a lipid-anchored mitochondrial protein that is part of a large protein complex that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Proteomic studies identified SLP-2 as a widely expressed mitochondria-enriched protein (1). As a member of both the stomatin family and stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HfLC/K (SPFH) superfamily of proteins, SLP-2 forms large hetero-oligomeric complexes with other mitochondrial proteins, including prohibtin, mitofusin 2, and cardiolipin (2, 3). SLP-2 contains a highly conserved SPFH domain that mediates its ability to associate with the mitochondrial inner membrane and form specialized membrane microdomains. As an inner membrane organizer of other mitochondrial proteins, SLP-2 performs multiple mitochondrial functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, energy/calcium homeostasis, translation, and mitochondrial-mediated cellular stress responses (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Enhanced SLP-2 expression is also associated with several human cancers, including gallbladder, rectal, and gastric cancer (9, 10, 11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2 and also known as STOML2) is a lipid-anchored mitochondrial protein that is part of a large protein complex that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Proteomic studies identified SLP-2 as a widely expressed mitochondria-enriched protein (1). As a member of both the stomatin family and stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HfLC/K (SPFH) superfamily of proteins, SLP-2 forms large hetero-oligomeric complexes with other mitochondrial proteins, including prohibtin, mitofusin 2, and cardiolipin (2, 3). SLP-2 contains a highly conserved SPFH domain that mediates its ability to associate with the mitochondrial inner membrane and form specialized membrane microdomains. As an inner membrane organizer of other mitochondrial proteins, SLP-2 performs multiple mitochondrial functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, energy/calcium homeostasis, translation, and mitochondrial-mediated cellular stress responses (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Enhanced SLP-2 expression is also associated with several human cancers, including gallbladder, rectal, and gastric cancer (9, 10, 11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SOD1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, is a major antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen (1). SOD1 is ubiquitously expressed and is localized in the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondrial intermembrane space. The SOD1 gene locus is on chromosome 21 in a region affected in Down Syndrome (2). In addition, over 100 distinct SOD1 inherited mutations have been identified in the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease of motor neurons (3-5). Despite the fact that SOD1 helps to eliminate toxic reactive species, its mutations in ALS have been described as gain-of-function (5). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1 induces the neurodegeneration observed in ALS is still unclear. Mutant SOD1 proteins become misfolded and consequently oligomerize into high molecular weight species that aggregate and end up in proteinaceous inclusions (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: SORL1, also called SorLA, is a 250 kDa type-1 membrane protein found in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system (1). SORL1 is related to the yeast transporter Vps10p (2). While its exact function is unknown, because it shuttles between the Golgi apparatus and endolysosomal compartments, and given its structural similarity with Vps10p, it has been suggested that SORL1 acts in intracellular trafficking (3). Interestingly, SORL1 expression has been shown to be decreased in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (4), and research studies have demonstrated a role for SORL1 as a neuronal sorting receptor that binds APP and regulates its trafficking and proteolytic processing, thus regulating the production of amyloid-beta peptides (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Spinophilin is an 815 amino acid protein composed of a PDZ domain, 2 actin-binding domains, a receptor- and PP1-binding domain, three coiled-coiled domains, a potential leucine/isoleucine zipper motif, and three potential SH3 domains (1). Spinophilin interacts with a large number of proteins including ion channel components and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Spinophilin also interacts with actin filaments; phosphorylation of spinophilin at Ser94 and Ser177 disrupts this interaction (2). Spinophilin has been shown to affect GPCR function through two different mechanisms: spinophilin acts as a functional inhibitor of α-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated arrestin signaling by competing with GRK2 binding to the adrenergic receptor (3) and spinophilin facilitates μ-opioid receptor desensitization by promoting receptor endocytosis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Stargazin is a four-pass transmembrane protein related to VDCC (voltage dependent calcium channel) γ subunits and part of the TARP (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein) family of proteins. TARP proteins can form a complex with AMPA receptors (GluR1-4) and serve as integral auxiliary subunits (1-6).Interactions between stargazin and AMPA receptors are implicated in regulation of receptor surface expression, synaptic clustering and recycling, as well as increased receptor responsiveness to glutamate (1,2,5,6). Stargazin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of AMPAR-mediated inflammatory pain by taking part in signaling pathways that relay pain in the spinal cord (5). Because the protein also modulates the pharmacology of AMPA receptors, it enhances the effects of AMPAR potentiators that have therapeutic potential for a number of mental and neurodegenerative diseases (6).The carboxy terminus of the stargazin protein interacts with the PDZ domains of PSD95 and other membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family members, and together traffic AMPA receptors to the cell surface membrane, anchoring them to the postsynaptic site (1,7). Phosphorylation of stargazin by PKA on Thr321 inhibits this binding (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP, also known as PTPN5), is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in dopaminoceptive neurons of the central nervous system (1). Alternative splicing produces the cytosolic STEP46 and the membrane-associated STEP61 isoforms of STEP. Dopamine activates D1 receptors and PKA, which in turn phosphorylate both isoforms of STEP. Phosphorylation of STEP61 occurs at Ser160 and Ser221, while STEP46 is phosphorylated at Ser49 (equivalent to Ser221 of STEP61) (2). NMDA-mediated activation of STEP is an important mechanism for regulation of Erk activity in neurons (3). Furthermore, STEP is involved in the regulation of both NMDAR and AMPAR trafficking (4,5). Due to its importance in cognitive function, STEP may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP, also known as PTPN5), is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in dopaminoceptive neurons of the central nervous system (1). Alternative splicing produces the cytosolic STEP46 and the membrane-associated STEP61 isoforms of STEP. Dopamine activates D1 receptors and PKA, which in turn phosphorylate both isoforms of STEP. Phosphorylation of STEP61 occurs at Ser160 and Ser221, while STEP46 is phosphorylated at Ser49 (equivalent to Ser221 of STEP61) (2). NMDA-mediated activation of STEP is an important mechanism for regulation of Erk activity in neurons (3). Furthermore, STEP is involved in the regulation of both NMDAR and AMPAR trafficking (4,5). Due to its importance in cognitive function, STEP may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP, also known as PTPN5), is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in dopaminoceptive neurons of the central nervous system (1). Alternative splicing produces the cytosolic STEP46 and the membrane-associated STEP61 isoforms of STEP. Dopamine activates D1 receptors and PKA, which in turn phosphorylate both isoforms of STEP. Phosphorylation of STEP61 occurs at Ser160 and Ser221, while STEP46 is phosphorylated at Ser49 (equivalent to Ser221 of STEP61) (2). NMDA-mediated activation of STEP is an important mechanism for regulation of Erk activity in neurons (3). Furthermore, STEP is involved in the regulation of both NMDAR and AMPAR trafficking (4,5). Due to its importance in cognitive function, STEP may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide (STOP) is a microtubule-associated protein, and its microtubule-stabilizing activity is regulated by calmodulin (1-2). STOPs have several tissue- and developmental-specific isoforms that are encoded by a single gene. Neurons express N-STOP (exons 1-4) and E-STOP (exons 1-3), fibroblasts express F-STOP (exons 1-2), oligodendrocytes express O-STOP, and astrocytes A-STOP (3). STOPs are the major contributors stabilizing microtubules that resist depolymerization due to cold or depolymerizing drugs. STOP knock-out mice display impaired synaptic plasticity associated with severe behavioral disorders in contrast to the anticipated neuronal development and brain anatomy defects (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SV2s are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins expressed in both neurons and endocrine cells. SV2s function in the regulation of synaptic vesicle traffic, cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels in the nerve terminal during repetitive stimulation and the facilitation of synaptic transmission. There are three isoforms of SV2: SV2A, SV2B and SV2C. Each of these isoforms are structured similarly but expressed varyingly. SV2C, a minor isoform of SV2, expressed in a small subset of neurons located within the basal forebrain, midbrain and brainstem. SV2B, a major isoform of SV2 is expressed more abundantly, although rarely without the coexpression of SV2A. SV2A, the other major isoform of SV2 is the most widely expressed. SV2A is located in the presynaptic nerve terminals of almost every neuron throughout the nervous system. In addition, it is also located in most neuroendocrine secretory granules (1). SV2A has been identified as a critical protein for proper function of the central nervous system and has been linked to the physiopathology of epilepsy (2). In addition to the epileptic affects of this protein, mutations in it have also been seen to result in schizophrenia (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross reactivity as the unconjugated Synapsin-1 (D12G5) XP® Rabbit mAb #5297
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse and rat tissues. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Synapsin-1 (D12G5) XP® Rabbit mAb #5297.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).