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Product listing: Synapsin Antibody, UniProt ID P17600 #2312 to TrkA Blocking Peptide, UniProt ID P04629 #1435

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Synaptophysin (SYP) is a neuronal synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that is expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms (1). Synaptophysin contains four transmembrane domains that form a hexameric channel or gap junction-like pore (2). Synaptophysin binds to the SNARE protein synaptobrevin/VAMP, which prevents the inclusion of synaptobrevin in the synaptic vesicle fusion complex and creates a pool of synaptobrevin for exocytosis when synapse activity increases (3). Synaptophysin is also responsible for targeting synaptobrevin 2/VAMP2 to synaptic vesicles, a critical component of the fusion complex (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is an integral membrane protein found in synaptic vesicles thought to play a role in vesicle trafficking and exocytosis (1). Individual SYT1 proteins are composed of an amino-terminal transmembrane region, a central linker region and a pair of carboxy-terminal C2 domains responsible for binding Ca2+ (2). The C2 domains appear to be functionally distinct, with the C2A domain responsible for regulating synaptic vesicle fusion in a calcium-dependent manner during exocytosis while the C2B domain allows for interaction between adjacent SYT1 proteins (3). Because synaptotagmin 1 binds calcium and is found in synaptic vesicles, this integral membrane protein is thought to act as a calcium sensor in fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Evidence suggests possible roles in vesicle-mediated endocytosis and glucose-induced insulin secretion as well (4,5). SYT1 binds several different SNARE proteins during calcium-mediated vesicle endocytosis and an association between SYT1 and the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is thought to be a key element in vesicle-mediated exocytosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SynGAP is a synaptic GTPase-activating protein selectively expressed in the brain and found at higher concentrations specifically at excitatory synapses in the mammalian forebrain. SynGAP has a PH domain, a C2 domain, and a highly conserved RasGAP domain, which negatively regulates both Ras activity and its downstream signaling pathways. SynGAP interacts with the PDZ domains of SAP102, as well as PSD95, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein that couples SynGAP to NMDA receptors (1). SynGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) at Ser765 and Ser1123, among other sites (2,3). Phosphorylation of SynGAP results in stimulation of the GTPase activity of Ras, and PSD95 dependent CaMKII phosphorylation of SynGAP increases after transient brain ischemia (1,4). SynGAP is implicated in NMDAR- and CaMKII-dependent regulation of AMPAR trafficking and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity (3,5). SynGAP is critical during neuronal development as mice lacking SynGAP protein die postnatally. Furthermore, SynGAP mutant mice have reduced long-term potentiation (LTP) and perform poorly in spatial memory tasks (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Synaptogyrin, or SYNGR, are a family of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including neuronal SYNGR1 and SYNGR3 that are found in synaptic vesicles and contribute to the proper synapse function. Synaptogyrin-2 (SYNGR2) expresses ubiquitously and it is not only associated with synaptic vesicles, but also plays an important role in exocytosis processes (1,3). In addition, it has been shown that SYNGRs modulate calcium currents in excitable cells during potassium chloride-dependent exocytosis (3). SYNGR3 and SYNGR1 specifically localize in synaptic vesicles. SYNGR1 modulates synaptic vesicle function similar to SYNGR3 (2,3). SYNGR1 and SYNGR3 contribute to the neurotransmitter release in neurons by interactions with the GABA and VGLUT transporters in primary neurons and in C. elegans (4-6). SYNGRs are associated with disease including Schizophrenia (7,8) and Alzheimer's disease (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Synaptogyrin, or SYNGR, are a family of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including neuronal SYNGR1 and SYNGR3 that are found in synaptic vesicles and contribute to the proper synapse function. Synaptogyrin-2 (SYNGR2) expresses ubiquitously and it is not only associated with synaptic vesicles, but also plays an important role in exocytosis processes (1,3). In addition, it has been shown that SYNGRs modulate calcium currents in excitable cells during potassium chloride-dependent exocytosis (3). SYNGR3 and SYNGR1 specifically localize in synaptic vesicles. SYNGR1 modulates synaptic vesicle function similar to SYNGR3 (2,3). SYNGR1 and SYNGR3 contribute to the neurotransmitter release in neurons by interactions with the GABA and VGLUT transporters in primary neurons and in C. elegans (4-6). SYNGRs are associated with disease including Schizophrenia (7,8) and Alzheimer's disease (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFAM (Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial; aka TCF6) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins because it contains two HMG boxes. TFAM is a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and enhances mtDNA transcription in a promoter-specific fashion in the presence of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor B (1). Because the majority of ATP production depends on the mitochondrial respiratory chain, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is critical for normal health. TFAM plays an essential role in the maintenance of mtDNA and thus, ATP production (2). TFAM binds to mtDNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner. It is known to have a dual effect on mtDNA: protection of mtDNA and initiation of transcription from mtDNA (3). TFAM attenuates age-dependent impairment of the brain by preventing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in microglia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TMP21, a type I transmembrane protein, is a member of the p24 cargo protein family, which is highly enriched in the ER, the Golgi and coat protein (COP) I and II transport vesicles (1,2). TMP21 is involved in protein transport and vesicular targeting. In particular, TMP21 influences APP trafficking by stabilizing nascent APP. The absence of TMP21 leads to enhanced maturation and cell surface accumulation of APP (3). In addition, TMP21 is a non-essential component of the γ-secretase complex with the potential to modulate γ-secretase mediated cleavage and Aβ production without having an effect on ε-secretase activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vesicle-associated membrane protein 1 (VAMP1), also called synaptobrevin 1, is part of the R-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex (1). The SNARE complex is involved in calcium regulated vesicular transport and membrane fusion (2). While related protein VAMP2 exhibits a wider distribution and is more abundant in the brain, VAMP1 is the main isoform in specific brain regions including the subthalamus nucleus zona incerta (1), the ostral periolivary region, and the retina (3). In addition, VAMP1 is involved in neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction (4) and in the release of bioactive peptides from cardiac myocytes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proteins in the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex are integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle transport and membrane fusion by pairing of vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) with cognate target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) (reviewed in 1,2). Vesicle associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3), also known as cellubrevin, has a broad tissue distribution and localizes to endosomal compartments (3). VAMP3 interacts with the t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP23, and SNAP25 (4,5). Research studies indicate that VAMP3 is involved in transferrin receptor recycling to the plasma membrane (6) and in T-cell receptor recycling to immunological synapses (7). Inhibition of VAMP3 with tetanus toxin impairs membrane trafficking during cell migration (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® BIN1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit BIN1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1, AMPHL) is an adaptor protein and putative tumor suppressor expressed as multiple isoforms due to alternative splicing. The BIN1 protein was originally identified as a Myc box-interacting protein with structural similarity to the synaptic vesicle protein amphiphysin (1). BIN1 protein structure contains an amino-terminal amphipathic helix and a BAR domain that is involved in sensing membrane curvature. The protein also includes a Myc-binding domain and a SH3 domain, which are implicated in protein-protein interactions (1). Multiple BIN1 isoforms range in size from approximately 45 to 65 kDa, with the nuclear BIN1 isoform found mostly in skeletal muscle and the cytoplasmic IIA isoform expressed in axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier of the brain (2,3). Corresponding BIN1 gene mutations and incorrect splicing can lead to impaired BIN1 membrane-tabulating and protein binding activities, resulting in development of autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy and myotonic dystrophy (4,5). Genome-wide association studies link the BIN1 gene with late onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and increased BIN1 mRNA expression is seen in AD brains (6,7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CREB siRNA from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CREB expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CREB siRNA I (Mouse Specific) from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CREB expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CREB siRNA from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CREB expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® CREB siRNA II (Mouse Specific) from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit CREB expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Merlin siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Merlin expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant, inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas, and other nervous system tumors. Both the familial tumors of NF2 and equivalent sporadic tumors found in the general population are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. Merlin (moesin, ezrin, and radixin-like protein) is the NF2 gene product, displaying striking similarity to ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins. Regulation of merlin (also called schwannomin) and ERM proteins involves intramolecular and intermolecular head-to-tail associations between family members (1). Merlin and ERM proteins act as linkers between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, affecting cell morphology, polarity, and signal transduction (2). Merlin is phosphorylated by the Rac/Cdc42 effector p21-activated kinase (PAK) at Ser518, negatively regulating Rac (3,4).

The Silent Synapses Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) using phospho-specific and control antibodies. AMPARs expression can be compared to other synaptic components including NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluN1 and the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD95. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: AMPA- (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), kainate-, and NMDA- (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are the three main families of ionotropic glutamate-gated ion channels. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are composed of four subunits (GluA1-4), which assemble as homo- or hetero-tetramers to mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmissions in the central nervous system. AMPARs are implicated in synapse formation, stabilization, and plasticity (1). In contrast to GluA2-containing AMPARs, AMPARs that lack GluA2 are permeable to calcium (2). Post-transcriptional modifications (alternative splicing, nuclear RNA editing) and post-translational modifications (glycosylation, phosphorylation) result in a very large number of permutations, fine-tuning the kinetic properties and surface expression of AMPARs representing key pathways to mediate synaptic plasticity (3). During development and mature states, some synapses exhibit “silent synapses” that lack functional AMPAR-mediated transmission. Synapses become “unsilenced” by post-translational modification of GluAs, particularly GluA1, which alters its kinetic properties and/or surface expression while other synaptic components, such as other glutamate receptors like NMDARs and postsynaptic scaffolding proteins like PSD95, remain unaltered. Conversely, reducing the AMPAR kinetic properties and surface expression can silence synapses. Key post-translational modifications implicated in regulating these processes include phosphorylation of GluA1 at Ser831 and Ser845 (4). Research studies have implicated activity-dependent changes in AMPARs in a variety of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, and epilepsy (1).

The TrkA and TrkB Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the Trk family of tyrosine kinase receptors. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform four Western blots with each antibody.

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

This peptide is used to block TrkA (14G6) Rabbit mAb #2508 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).