20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Product listing: NRBF-2 (D8G1) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q96F24 #8633 to Androgen Receptor Antibody (Carboxy-terminal Antigen), UniProt ID P10275 #54653

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nuclear Receptor Binding Factor-2 (NRBF-2), also referred to as Comodulator of PPAR and RXRα-2 (COPR-2), has been shown to interact with the AF-2 region of several nuclear hormone receptors with varying affinities such as PPARα, RARα, RARγ, and RXRα (1,2). NRBF-2 contains a LLYLL motif, which matches the LXXLL NR box consensus and is required for functional NRBF-2/nuclear receptor complex formation and repression of receptor function. NRBF-2 also contains a unique autonomous activation domain and, thus, does not completely abrogate nuclear receptor function, suggesting that NRBF-2 might serve as a molecular rheostat to fine-tune the transcriptional activity of liganded nuclear receptors (1,2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Nur77 (D63C5) XP® Rabbit mAb #3960.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Nur77, also known as TR3 and NGFI-B, is an immediate-early response gene and an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily (1-3). Nur77 is composed of an amino-terminal transactivation domain, a central DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. Expression of Nur77 is rapidly induced by a variety of stimuli, including apoptotic, mitogenic and stress signals (1-6). It has been proposed to have many functions related to cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Nur77 has been extensively studied in T cells where it has been implicated in the process of negative selection and TCR-mediated apoptosis (5,6). Nur77 binds to specific DNA elements leading to the regulation of target genes (7). As a possible mechanism for regulating apoptosis, Nur77 can induce the expression of apoptotic genes such as FasL and TRAIL (8,9). Nur77 is heavily phosphorylated by multiple kinases, which may affect its transactivation activity as well as its subcellular localization (4,10,11). Translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria can regulate its association with Bcl-2 and control the release of cytochrome c, thereby triggering apoptosis (12,13).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nur77, also known as TR3 and NGFI-B, is an immediate-early response gene and an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily (1-3). Nur77 is composed of an amino-terminal transactivation domain, a central DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. Expression of Nur77 is rapidly induced by a variety of stimuli, including apoptotic, mitogenic and stress signals (1-6). It has been proposed to have many functions related to cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Nur77 has been extensively studied in T cells where it has been implicated in the process of negative selection and TCR-mediated apoptosis (5,6). Nur77 binds to specific DNA elements leading to the regulation of target genes (7). As a possible mechanism for regulating apoptosis, Nur77 can induce the expression of apoptotic genes such as FasL and TRAIL (8,9). Nur77 is heavily phosphorylated by multiple kinases, which may affect its transactivation activity as well as its subcellular localization (4,10,11). Translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria can regulate its association with Bcl-2 and control the release of cytochrome c, thereby triggering apoptosis (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The prohibitins PHB1 and PHB2 are highly conserved, multifunctional proteins present in eukaryotic nuclear and mitochondrial compartments (1). Prohibitin-2 (PHB2, REA) was originally identified as an estrogen receptor-specific coregulator. PHB2 directly interacts with hormone-bound estrogen receptor and represses its transcriptional activity through competitive inhibition of Src-1 coactivation of the estrogen receptor (2,3). Together with COUP transcription factors, PHB2 interacts with histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC5 to mediate transcriptional regulation by the estrogen receptor through coupling the deacetylase to the transcription activation complex (4). Prohibitin PHB1/PHB2 heterodimers form large ring complexes on the mitochondrial membrane (5) and act as chaperones to stabilize mitochondrial proteins, such as OPA1 and Hax1, to support mitochondrial morphogenesis and protect against apoptosis (6-8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, contains highly conserved DNA binding and ligand binding domains (1). Through its estrogen-independent and estrogen-dependent activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2, respectively), ERα regulates transcription by recruiting coactivator proteins and interacting with general transcriptional machinery (2). Phosphorylation at multiple sites provides an important mechanism to regulate ERα activity (3-5). Ser104, 106, 118, and 167 are located in the amino-terminal transcription activation function domain AF-1, and phosphorylation of these serine residues plays an important role in regulating ERα activity. Ser118 may be the substrate of the transcription regulatory kinase CDK7 (5). Ser167 may be phosphorylated by p90RSK and Akt (4,6). According to the research literature, phosphorylation at Ser167 may confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nur77, also known as TR3 and NGFI-B, is an immediate-early response gene and an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily (1-3). Nur77 is composed of an amino-terminal transactivation domain, a central DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. Expression of Nur77 is rapidly induced by a variety of stimuli, including apoptotic, mitogenic and stress signals (1-6). It has been proposed to have many functions related to cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Nur77 has been extensively studied in T cells where it has been implicated in the process of negative selection and TCR-mediated apoptosis (5,6). Nur77 binds to specific DNA elements leading to the regulation of target genes (7). As a possible mechanism for regulating apoptosis, Nur77 can induce the expression of apoptotic genes such as FasL and TRAIL (8,9). Nur77 is heavily phosphorylated by multiple kinases, which may affect its transactivation activity as well as its subcellular localization (4,10,11). Translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria can regulate its association with Bcl-2 and control the release of cytochrome c, thereby triggering apoptosis (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a transcriptional activator (1). PPARγ is preferentially expressed in adipocytes as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophage (2). Besides its role in mediating adipogenesis and lipid metabolism (2), PPARγ also modulates insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and inflammation (3). PPARγ transcriptional activity is inhibited by MAP kinase phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser84 (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a transcriptional activator (1). PPARγ is preferentially expressed in adipocytes as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophage (2). Besides its role in mediating adipogenesis and lipid metabolism (2), PPARγ also modulates insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and inflammation (3). PPARγ transcriptional activity is inhibited by MAP kinase phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser84 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a transcriptional activator (1). PPARγ is preferentially expressed in adipocytes as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophage (2). Besides its role in mediating adipogenesis and lipid metabolism (2), PPARγ also modulates insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and inflammation (3). PPARγ transcriptional activity is inhibited by MAP kinase phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser84 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Progesterone Receptor A/B (D8Q2J) XP® Rabbit mAb #8757.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Progesterone Receptor A/B (D8Q2J) XP® Rabbit mAb #8757.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Progesterone Receptor A/B (D8Q2J) XP® Rabbit mAb #8757.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Retinoids (vitamin A and its active retinoic acid derivatives) are non-steroid hormones that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, -beta and -gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRalpha, -beta and -gamma) are nuclear receptors that function as RAR-RXR heterodimers or RXR homodimers (1-2). In response to retinoid binding, these dimers control gene expression by binding to specific retinoic acid response elements, by recruiting cofactors and the transcriptional machinery, and by indirectly regulating chromatin structure. Finally, ligand binding and phosphorylation of RARalpha by JNK at Thr181, Ser445 and Ser461 controls the stability of RAR-RXR through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (3-4). At least four distinct genetic lesions affect RARalpha and result in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The t(15;17) translocation that results in the PML-RARalpha fusion protein is responsible for more than 99% of APL cases, and the fusion protein inhibits PML-dependent apoptotic pathways in a dominant negative fashion. In addition PML-RARalpha inhibits transcription of retinoic acid target genes by recruiting co-repressors, attenuating myeloid differentiation (5-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs) consist of three subtypes encoded by separate genes: α (NR1B1), β (NR1B2), and γ (NR1B3). For each subtype, there are at least two isoforms, which are generated by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing and differ only in their N-terminal regions. Retinoids, which are metabolites of vitamin A, serve as ligands for RARs (1). RARs function as ligand-dependent transcriptional regulators and are found to be heterodimerized with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). These transcriptionally active dimers regulate the expression of genes involved in cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis (2,3). Consequently, RARs play critical roles in a variety of biological processes, including development, reproduction, immunity, and organogenesis (4-6). RAR mutations, fusion proteins, altered expression levels, or aberrant post-translational modifications result in multiple diseases due to altered RAR function and disruption of homeostasis.In contrast to the ubiquitously expressed RARα subtype, RARγ displays a complex tissue-specific expression pattern (7). The hematopoietic system expresses significant levels of RARγ, and a recent study identified a role for RARγ in hematopoietic stem cell maintenance (8). RARγ is the predominant subtype in human and mouse epidermis, representing 90% of the RARs in this tissue (9-11). Given the high level of RARγ expression in the skin, it has been suggested that this nuclear receptor participates in a transcriptional program that governs maintenance and differentiation of normal epidermis and skin appendages. The transcriptional activity of RARγ is under stringent control, in part, through retinoic acid-induced phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Reverse orientation c-erbA gene α (Rev-erbα, EAR-1, or NR1D1) is a widely expressed member of the orphan nuclear receptor family of proteins (1). Rev-erbα is highly expressed in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, brain and liver, and regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation. Expression increases during differentiation in adipocytes and ectopic expression of Rev-erbα potentiates the adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells (2). In addition, expression oscillates with circadian rhythm in liver cells and Rev-erbα regulates expression of BMAL1, ApoA-I and ApoC-III, all key regulators of circadian rhythm (3-7). Phosphorylation of Rev-erbα Ser55 and Ser59 by GSK-3β appears to stabilize Rev-erbα protein levels and is important for synchronizing and maintaining the circadian clock (8). Rev-erbα also regulates inflammation by targeting the NF-κB responsive genes IL-6 and COX-2 (9). Rev-erbα lacks the activation function 2 domain required for ligand-dependent activation of transcription by other members of the nuclear receptor family; thus it behaves as a constitutive repressor protein, recruiting the nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR)/HDAC3 complex to target genes to repress transcription (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are encoded by three distinct genes (RXRα, RXRβ, and RXRγ) and bind selectively and with high affinity to the vitamin A derivative, 9-cis-retinoic acid. RXRs are type-II nuclear hormone receptors that are largely localized to the nuclear compartment independent of ligand binding. Nuclear RXRs form heterodimers with nuclear hormone receptor subfamily 1 proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor, retinoic acid receptors, vitamin D receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver X receptors, and farnesoid X receptor (1). Since RXRs heterodimerize with multiple nuclear hormone receptors, they play a central role in transcriptional control of numerous hormonal signaling pathways by binding to cis-acting response elements in the promoter/enhancer region of target genes (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: There are three members of the steroid receptor co-activator (SRC) family of proteins: SRC-1 (NCoA-1), SRC-2 (TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2), and SRC-3 (ACTR/pCIP/RAC3/TRAM-1/AIB1). All SRC family members share significant structural homology and function to stimulate transcription mediated by nuclear hormone receptors and other transcriptional activators such as Stat3, NF-κB, E2F1, and p53 (1-4). Two SRC proteins, SRC-1 and SRC-3, function as histone acetyltransferases (5,6). In addition, all three family members can recruit other histone acetyltransferases (CBP/p300, PCAF) and histone methyltransferases (PRMT1, CARM1) to target promoters and cooperate to enhance expression of many genes (5-8). The SRC proteins play important roles in multiple physiological processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, somatic cell growth, mammary gland development, female reproductive function, and vasoprotection (9). SRC-1 and SRC-3 are conduits for kinase-mediated growth factor signaling to the estrogen receptor and other transcriptional activators. Seven SRC-1 phosphorylation sites and six SRC-3 phosphorylation sites have been identified, which are induced by steroids, cytokines, and growth factors and involve multiple kinase signaling pathways (9-11). Research has shown that all three SRC family members are associated with increased activity of nuclear receptors in breast, prostate, and ovarian carcinomas. According to the literature, SRC-3 is frequently amplified or overexpressed in a number of cancers (12), and SRC-1/PAX3 and SRC-2/MYST3 translocations are found associated with rhabdomyosarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively (13,14).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The orphan nuclear receptor, steroidogenic factor 1 (STF-1, also called Ad4BP), is encoded by the NR5A1 gene and plays an instrumental role in directing the transcriptional control of steroidogenesis (1). Initially identified as a tissue-specific transcriptional regulator of cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, research studies of both global (2) and tissue-specific knockout mice (3-6) have demonstrated that STF-1 is required for the development of adrenal glands, gonads, ventromedial hypothalamus, and for the proper functioning of pituitary gonadotropes. Indeed, humans with mutations that render STF-1 transcriptionally inactive can present with testicular failure, ovarian failure, and adrenal insufficiency (7,8). Furthermore, dysregulation of STF-1 has been linked to diseases such as endometriosis (9) and adrenocortical carcinoma (10).Like other nuclear hormone receptors, STF-1 has a modular domain structure composed of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, a carboxy-terminal AF-2 activation domain, and a hinge region with AF-1-like activation activity. STF-1 also contains a fushi tarazu factor 1 box, which functions as an accessory DNA binding domain (11). STF-1 is primarily phosphorylated at Ser203, which is thought to enhance its transcriptional activity by promoting complex formation with transcriptional cofactors (12). In addition to phosphorylation at Ser203, STF-1 is subject to SUMO conjugation and acetylation at ε-amino groups of target lysine residues. Whereas SUMOylation represses STF-1 function (13,14), acetylation enhances its transcriptional activity (15).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Although originally identified based on their roles in calcium and bone homeostasis, the vitamin D3 receptor (VDR/NR1I1) and its ligand 1-α, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1α, 25(OH)2D3] are now recognized to exert biological effects in almost every tissue of the human body. Targets for vitamin D signaling include the central nervous system, skin, immune system, endocrine glands, kidney, and colon. At the cellular level, vitamin D signaling affects proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of both normal and transformed cells. Within the steroid receptor gene family, VDR belongs to the NR1I subfamily that also includes NR1I2/PXR and NR1I3/CAR. The human VDR gene is composed of 11 exons that encode six domains (A-F) of the full length VDR protein, which includes an N-terminal dual zinc finger DNA binding domain, a C-terminal ligand-binding activity domain, and an extensive unstructured region that links the two functional domains together (1). Upon 1α, 25(OH)2D3 binding to the hormone ligand-binding domain, VDR is stabilized by the phosphorylation of Ser51 in the DNA-binding domain by PKC (2), and Ser208 in the hinge region by casein kinase II (3). VDR associates with the retinoic acid receptor (RXR) through dimerization domains. The 1α, 25(OH)2D3-VDR-RXR complex binds to the vitamin D response elements (VDREs) in the promoters of target genes through the DNA-binding domain. Ligand-induced conformation changes in VDR results in the dissociation of the co-repressor, silencing-mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), and allows interaction of the VDR activation function (AF2) transactivation domain with transcriptional coactivators (1).Studies have shown that variable VDR expression is associated with different forms or stages of cancer and likely results from tissue-type variation in 1α, 25(OH)2D3 signaling. In the case of colon cancer, research indicates that VDR expression is relatively higher in hyperplastic colon polyps and during early tumorigenesis but diminishes in later stage, poorly differentiated tumors. Multiple studies suggest that 1α, 25(OH)2D3 may be an attractive target for development as a therapeutic anticancer agent (4,5) .

The Nuclear Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the presence and status of nuclear receptors. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Androgen Receptor Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of total androgen receptor protein. An Androgen Receptor Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, androgen receptor protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, an Androgen Receptor Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured androgen receptor protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of total androgen receptor protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Estrogen Receptor α Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of estrogen receptor α protein. An Estrogen Receptor α Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-estrogen receptor α proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, an Estrogen Receptor α Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect captured estrogen receptor α proteins. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of estrogen receptor α protein.Antibodies in the kit are custom formulations specific to the kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, contains highly conserved DNA binding and ligand binding domains (1). Through its estrogen-independent and estrogen-dependent activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2, respectively), ERα regulates transcription by recruiting coactivator proteins and interacting with general transcriptional machinery (2). Phosphorylation at multiple sites provides an important mechanism to regulate ERα activity (3-5). Ser104, 106, 118, and 167 are located in the amino-terminal transcription activation function domain AF-1, and phosphorylation of these serine residues plays an important role in regulating ERα activity. Ser118 may be the substrate of the transcription regulatory kinase CDK7 (5). Ser167 may be phosphorylated by p90RSK and Akt (4,6). According to the research literature, phosphorylation at Ser167 may confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).