20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Product listing: PKCβ (D3E7O) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P05771 #46809 to β2-Adrenergic Receptor (D6H2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P07550 #8513

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PKCθ (E1I7Y) Rabbit mAb #13643.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Pig

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Protein kinase D2 (PKD2) is one of three members of the protein kinase D family, including PKD1/PKCμ and PKD3/PKCν, that belong to the calcium/calmodulin superfamily of serine/threonine protein kinases (1,2). PKDs contain a conserved, carboxy-terminal catalytic domain, an amino-terminal regulatory region hallmarked by a PH domain that coordinates subcellular localization, and two zinc-finger/C1 lipid-binding domains that mediate activation of the enzyme in response to diacylglycerol (DAG) or phorbol ester (2,3). In addition to lipid-mediated activation, PKD catalytic activity can also be stimulated via phosphorylation of critical serine residues within the activation loop of the enzyme (4-8). Novel PKCs, such as PKCη and PKCε, have been shown to phosphorylate PKD1 at Ser744 and Ser748 (Ser706 and Ser710 in human PKD2), resulting in alleviation of autoinhibition of the enzyme mediated by PH domain interactions with the catalytic domain (5). Phosphorylation and activation of PKD isoforms has also been described for other upstream kinases. For example, casein kinase 2 (CK2) has been shown to phosphorylate PKD2 at Ser244, which promotes nuclear accumulation of PKD2, phosphorylation of HDAC7, and expression of Nur77 (9). Although only a handfull of PKD2 effectors have been identified, PKD2 has been implicated in regulating an array of cellular events, including cell survival, development, growth, migration, and transformation (10-14). PKD2-mediated phosphorylation of at least one known substrate, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type IIIβ (PI4KIIIβ), also implicates PKD2 in the formation and regulation of exocytotic transport vesicles from the trans Golgi network (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PKCν, also known as PKD3, is a member of the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases that play critical roles in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation. PKCν is composed of 890 amino acid residues and has 77.3% similarity to human PKCμ (PKCμ) and 77. 4% similarity to mouse PKD (the mouse homolog of PKCμ) (1). The PKCν mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. PKCν has two putative diacylglycerol binding C1 domains, suggesting that it may participate in a novel diacylglycerol-mediated signaling pathway (2). PKCν is translocated to the plasma membrane and activated by the diacylglycerol mimic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. PKCν is an important physiologic target of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and exhibits robust activation after BCR engagement (2). GPCR agonists induce a rapid activation of PKCν by a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway that leads to the phosphorylation of the activation loop of PKCν. PKCν is present both in the nucleus and cytoplasm and this distribution of PKCν results from its continuous shuttling between both compartments by a mechanism that requires a nuclear import receptor and a competent CRM1-nuclear export pathway (3). Cell stimulation with the GPCR agonist neurotensin induces a rapid and reversible plasma membrane translocation of PKCν that is PKC-dependent.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PLCc1 (D9H10) XP® Rabbit mAb #5690.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). The PLD2 isoform is highly expressed in many cancers, such as colorectal and breast cancers (2,3). PLD2 also acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rac2 independent of its phospholipase activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). The PLD2 isoform is highly expressed in many cancers, such as colorectal and breast cancers (2,3). PLD2 also acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rac2 independent of its phospholipase activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Pig

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein kinase C-related kinases (PRKs) are a subfamily of Ser/Thr-specific kinases with a catalytic domain highly homologous to the PKC family (1-3). They are effectors of Rho family GTPases (4-6) and are activated by fatty acids and phospholipids in vitro (7,8). Activation in vitro and in vivo involves the activation loop phosphorylation of PRK1 (Thr774)/PRK2 (Thr816) by PDK1 (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large (>500 kDa), intracellular calcium channels found in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are responsible for the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in excitable cells, such as muscle and neurons. RyRs exist as three mammalian isoforms (RyR1-3), all of which form homotetramers regulated by phosphorylation and/or direct or indirect interaction with a variety of proteins (L-type calcium channels, PKA, FKBP12/12.6, CaMKII, calmodulin, calsequestrin, junctin, and triadin) and ions (Mg2+ and Ca2+). Regulation of the RyR channel by protein modulators occurs within the large cytoplasmic domain, whereas the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein forms the ion-binding and conducting pore (1,2). RyR1 and RyR2 are predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively, where they localize exclusively to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and facilitate calcium-mediated communication between transverse-tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Contraction of skeletal muscle is triggered by release of calcium ions from the SR following depolarization of T-tubules. Research studies have shown that defects in RyR1 are the cause of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 1 (MHS1), central core disease of muscle (CCD), multiminicore disease with external ophthalmoplegia, and congenital myopathy with fiber-type disproportion (CFTD), each of which is manifested by defects in muscle function, metabolism, and development (2). Investigators have shown that defects in RyR2 are the cause of familial arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia type 2 (ARVD2) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 (CPVT1), both of which are implicated in sudden death syndromes as a result of electrical instability and degeneration of the ventricular myocardium or stress-induced ventricular tachycardia (2). Despite low levels of expression in skeletal and smooth muscle, RyR3 is the dominant isoform in neuronal cells (hippocampal neurons, thalamus, Purkinje cells) and has been implicated in synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine remodeling, and spatial memory formation (3). The role of RyR3 in neuronal function has been substantiated by mice lacking RyR3, which demonstrate normal motor function, but possess numerous behavioral and social defects (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sphingosine kinases (SPHKs) catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator with both intra- and extracellular functions. Together with other sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, SPHKs regulate the balance of the lipid mediators, ceramide, sphingosine, and S1P (1-4). Two distinct SPHK isoforms, SPHK1 and SPHK2, have been cloned and characterized (5,6). SPHK1 and SPHK2 are highly conserved and diversely expressed (7,8). The SPHKs are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, immunoglobulin receptors, cytokines, and other stimuli (9-12). The molecular mechanisms by which SPHK1 and SPHK2 are specifically regulated are complex and only partially understood.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sphingosine kinases (SPHKs) catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator with both intra- and extracellular functions. Together with other sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, SPHKs regulate the balance of the lipid mediators, ceramide, sphingosine, and S1P (1-4). Two distinct SPHK isoforms, SPHK1 and SPHK2, have been cloned and characterized (5,6). SPHK1 and SPHK2 are highly conserved and diversely expressed (7,8). The SPHKs are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, immunoglobulin receptors, cytokines, and other stimuli (9-12). The molecular mechanisms by which SPHK1 and SPHK2 are specifically regulated are complex and only partially understood.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ca2+ is a key second messenger in many intracellular signaling pathways. Ca2+ signals control many cellular functions ranging from short-term responses such as contraction and secretion to longer-term regulation of cell growth and proliferation (1,2). Stromal interaction molecules (STIMs) function as Ca2+ sensors that detect changes in Ca2+ content in intracellular Ca2+ stores (3). STIM1 is conserved, ubiquitously expressed, and functions as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor that migrates from the ER Ca2+ store to the plasma membrane where it activates calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels when the ER Ca2+ store is low (4). STIM1 is a potential tumor suppressor; defects in STIM1 may cause rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdoid tumors (5). STIM1 can either homodimerize or form heterodimers with STIM2. STIM2 possesses a high sequence identity to STIM1 and can function as an inhibitor of STIM1-mediated plasma membrane store-operated Ca2+ entry (6). However, further investigation is required to elucidate the true physiological function of STIM2.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) is a calcium-dependent enzyme that cross-links both cytosolic and extracellular matrix proteins by catalyzing the formation of bonds between lysine and glutamine residues (1). This bifunctional enzyme also has intrinsic GTPase activity, and it has been suggested that regulation of the transamidase activity might be regulated through a G-protein coupled receptor-signaling pathway (2). In cross-linking peptides, TGM2 helps to regulate cytoskeletal structure, cell migration, apoptosis and cell-matrix adhesion. In addition, the enzyme plays an important role in wound healing and the immune response (3). TGM2 has exhibited kinase activity in vitro, with insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) as one possible substrate (4). This widely expressed protein is localized to the cytosol and nucleus, but has also been isolated from the cell surface and extracellular matrix (reviewed in 5). Because of its interaction with a number of different substrates, and its role in the response to injury, TGM2 has been associated with the pathology of a number of human disorders. It has long been recognized as the major autoantigen in celiac disease (6); altered TGM2 expression or activity may be associated with Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease, arteriosclerosis, diabetes, and numerous forms of cancer (reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18 kDa mitochondrial drug- and cholesterol-transporting protein involved in steroid hormone synthesis and mitochondrial homeostasis in a variety of cell types (1,2). Originally thought to play a role exclusively in steroid synthesis in steroidogenic cells, subsequent research studies have implicated TSPO in a variety of pathologies in a broad range of tissues including progression of breast cancer, neuroinflammation, and neurological disorders (1,3-5). TSPO was first identified by its ability to bind benzodiazepines in peripheral tissues and glial cells, hence its alternate name Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR).TSPO has been shown to modulate an array of cellular functions; it is critical for steroidogenesis, modulates mitochondrial function and metabolism, and plays a role in both cell proliferation and apoptosis (6-8). TSPO is found in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it coordinates with Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Factor (StAR) to transport cholesterol into the mitochondria and is critical for steroidogenesis and tumor progression (9,10). This is illustrated by studies that show the non-aggressive, hormone-dependent cell line, MCF7, expresses low levels of TSPO whereas the more aggressive, metastatic, and hormone-independent cell line, MDA-MB-231, expresses high levels of TSPO (10). This study, and others, suggest that TSPO may be an important regulator of hormone-dependent tumor progression. Numerous investigations have concluded that due to its high affinity for pharmacological compounds and up-regulation in disease, TSPO is an attractive target for diagnosis and treatment of tumor progression, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurological/psychiatric disorders (11-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: There are four major Adrenergic Receptor (AR) subtypes (α1, α2, β1, β2). Each of the subtypes has been classified by their unique responses to agonists and antagonists. Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of guanine nucleotide-binding, regulatory protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which transverse the plasma membrane seven times. The transmembrane regions are hydrophobic and are interconnected by hydrophilic loops (1). β2-Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR) is the most studied receptor of the catecholamine system. β2AR stimulation occurs through the catecholamines epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) acting as neuromodulators in the central nervous system and as hormones in the vascular system. β2AR activation results in coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins and activation of the second messengers cAMP and phosphatidylinositol, ultimately leading to changes in cellular physiology. GPCR kinases (GRKs) terminate β2AR signaling through phosphorylation of the GPCR and by recruiting β-arrestin. β-arrestin binding uncouples the receptor from the G protein, thereby terminating G protein–mediated signaling (desensitization), and initiating clathrin-mediated endocytosis (internalization) of β2AR (2). β-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are drugs that block catecholamines from binding to βAR and are prescribed for cardiac arrhythmias, cardioprotection after myocardial infarction (heart attack), and hypertension (3).