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Product listing: ERCC1 (D6G6) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P07992 #12345 to MCM3 (D47B6) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P25205 #4003

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Melanoma associated antigen (mutated) 1 (MUM1, EXPAND1) is a PWWP-domain containing chromatin binding protein involved in maintaining chromatin architecture of interphase chromosomes. In response to DNA damage, EXPAND1/MUM1 accumulates at sites of DNA double strand breaks through direct interaction with DNA repair factor 53BP1 (1). Accumulation of EXPAND1/MUM1 at damaged DNA sites is thought to modify the structure of the chromatin and allow access to other DNA repair factors (2). 53BP1 activates the checkpoint kinase ATM and promotes DNA double strand break repair via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that results in chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). The ubiquitously expressed FA complementation group A protein (FANCA, FAA) is a component of the FA nuclear complex that also contains FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCL, and FANCM. In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2 and FANCN/PALB2 are then recruited to sites of DNA damage along with other DNA repair proteins. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).DNA-damage-dependent localization and stability of FANCA protein regulates FA complex function and localization. Interaction between FANCA protein and the Hsp90 chaperone protein regulates FANCA protein stability and turnover, and may play a role in controlling the FA DNA damage pathway (4). Mutations in the corresponding FANCA gene are responsible for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in symptoms that include chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). FANCB is an X-linked member of the Fanconi Anemia nuclear complex (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCM). In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2 and FANCN/PALB2 are then recruited to sites of DNA damage along with other DNA repair proteins. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).Studies of FANCB knockout embryonic stem cells suggest a role for FANCB in the formation of Rad51 and FANCD2 foci at chromosomal sites of DNA damage (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in symptoms that include chromosomal breakage, bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C), and a predisposition to cancer (1). In response to DNA damage, the FA nuclear complex (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCM) induces mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI (2).Monoubiquitination of FANCD2 induces localization of FANCD2 to sites of DNA damage, where it interacts with BRCA1 (4). FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCD1/BRCA2, and FANCN/PALB2 are also recruited to sites of DNA damage. FA signaling is important in maintenance of chromosome stability and control of mitosis (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FoxM1 (D3F2B) Rabbit mAb #20459.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GADD45 α, β and γ are an evolutionarily conserved, homologous family of nuclear proteins that function as stress sensors for cellular physiological and environmental damage. GADD45 proteins are required for the activation of the G2/M checkpoint induced by UV radiation or alkylating agents (1). GADD45-induced G2/M checkpoint is regulated through inactivation of Cdc2-cyclin B1 kinase (2). GADD45 forms a complex with p21 and Cdc2, and may serve as core for interaction with other cell cycle regulators (3,4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. Once this complex is formed, the origin is “licensed” for initiation of DNA replication. In order to ensure that replication occurs only once per cell cycle, geminin binds to and inhibits CDT1 during the S, G2 and M phases. This prevents the recruitment of the MCM complex to the origins of replication, which blocks the premature reformation of the Pre-RC. At the metaphase/anaphase transition, geminin is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) allowing for the formation of new pre-RC (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are toxic DNA lesions caused by environmental agents as well as some chemotherapeutic drugs. These lesions are repaired via multiple DNA repair pathways. HELQ (also known as HEL308) is a 3’-5’ DNA helicase that colocalizes with stalled DNA replication forks in response to DNA damage, and contributes to the repair of ICL lesions through ATR signaling (1,2). HELQ interacts with various DNA repair proteins, including FANCD2, RAD51, RAD51 paralogs, and ATR (1-3). HELQ-deficient mice exhibit reduced fertility as well as interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair defects, and are prone to tumors (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CENP-A is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin. The inherited localization of the centromere is specified by CENP-A (1). CENP-A deposition to the correct chromosomal location in early G1 phase is regulated by the Mis18 complex, which recruits the CENP-A assembly factor/chaperone protein HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) (2-3).Dimerization of HJURP is required for its activity (4), and phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinases is required for temporal regulation of HJURP recruitment (5).Overexpression of HJURP causes chromosome loss in yeast and mitotic defects in mammalian cells (6). Further, downregulation of HJURP expression has been associated with replicative senescence in human cells (7).Research studies indicate that HJURP may have prognostic value in human breast cancer and high grade gliomas (8-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage resulting from genotoxic stress activates cellular checkpoints that prevent or delay cell division until damaged DNA is repaired or the cell follows an apoptotic pathway. The Rad9 homolog A (Rad9A, Rad9) protein is part of a checkpoint protein complex that acts as an early sensor of DNA damage. Together with the HUS1 and Rad1 checkpoint proteins, Rad9 forms a heterotrimeric 9-1-1 complex with a ring structure similar to the processivity factor PCNA. The 9-1-1 complex induces multiple signaling pathways, including the ATM- and ATR-activated DNA repair pathways (1,2). A functional 9-1-1 complex is required for ATR-dependent S phase checkpoint signaling (3).The 9-1-1 complex interacts with DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) in response to DNA damage, activating ATR and causing signal amplification through further recruitment of TopBP1 (4). The 9-1-1 complex interacts with DNA mismatch repair proteins MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6 to play a role in mismatch repair (5). During an error-free DNA damage tolerance process, the 9-1-1 complex cooperates with polyubiquitinated PCNA and Exo1 nuclease to support switching of the replicative polymerase to the undamaged template (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human and rat cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Large tumor suppressor (LATS) proteins (LATS1, LATS2) are serine/threonine kinases that belong to the NDR family (1). The Drosophila homolog (warts) was first identified as a tumor suppressor protein that plays a role in the maintenance of ploidy. Human LATS1 was shown to localize to the centrosome and the mitotic spindle and control G2/M transition by negatively regulating cdc2 kinase activity (2,3). LATS1 is also reported to play a role in the G1 tetraploidy checkpoint, via control of p53 expression (4). LATS1 affects cytokinesis by regulating actin polymerization through negative modulation of LIMK1 (5). LATS1 also binds the phosphorylated form of zyxin, a regulator of actin filament assembly. This interaction promotes localization of zyxin to the mitotic spindle, suggesting a role for actin regulatory proteins during mitosis (6). Decreased expression of LATS1 is associated with breast tumor aggressiveness (7), and mutations perturbing LATS1 have been associated with human sarcomas and ovarian sarcomas (8,9). LATS1 knockout mice develop soft-tissue sarcomas, ovarian stromal cell tumor, and display a high sensitivity to carcinogenic treatments (10). LATS1 and LATS2 have also been identified as key members of the Hippo signaling pathway, a conserved kinase cascade that functions to regulate cell growth and apoptosis (11). Phosphorylation of LATS by Mammalian Sterile-20-like proteins (e.g., MST1) results in LATS-mediated phosphorylation of the transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ (12, 13). LATS-mediated phosphorylation of YAP and TAZ promotes their cytoplasmic sequestration and association with 14-3-3 proteins, and subsequent proteasomal degradation, leading to downregulation of YAP/TAZ target genes that promote cell growth (11, 14).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Large tumor suppressor kinase 2 (LATS2) is an AGC kinase of the NDR family of kinases. It is a LATS family tumor suppressor that plays a critical role in centrosome duplication, maintenance of mitotic fidelity, and genomic stability (1). LATS2 inhibits cell growth at the G1/S transition by down-regulating cyclin E/CDK2 kinase activity (2). It also plays an important role in regulation of the Hippo pathway, which is important in controlling organ size and tumor progression by regulating cellular proliferation and promoting apoptosis (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Correct segregation of sister chromatids prior to the onset of cell division is essential to the maintenance of genetic integrity and the avoidance of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability, characteristics of many cancer cells. The mitotic checkpoint, also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, monitors accurate attachment of kinetochores to the spindle, inhibits mitosis and delays the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are aligned at the metaphase plate (1). MAD2L1 is an essential participant in the mitotic checkpoint (2). It exists in two conformations, including the open and inactive O-MAD2 form and the closed, active C-MAD2 form. Prior to mitosis, MAD2L1 is localized to the cytosol and exists largely in the closed, inactive form. During the mitotic checkpoint, MAD2L1 switches to the open, active conformation (3). Together with other checkpoint proteins, MAD2L1 binds to and deactivates Cdc20, thereby inhibiting the anaphase promoting complex (4). When the kinetochores are correctly attached to the spindle, MAD2L1 releases Cdc20, which allows activation of the anaphase promoting complex and subsequent degradation of key mitotic substrates and the initiation of metaphase-anaphase transition (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitotic control is important for normal growth, development, and maintenance of all eukaryotic cells. Research studies have demonstrated that inappropriate control of mitosis can lead to genomic instability and cancer (reviewed in 1,2). A regulator of mitosis, Greatwall kinase (Gwl), was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (3). Subsequent studies showed that, based on sequence homology and function, microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) is the human ortholog of Gwl (4). Regulation of MASTL/Gwl activation has been shown to be critical for the correct timing of mitosis. Research studies have shown that Gwl is activated by hyperphosphorylation (5). The phosphorylation of human Gwl at Thr194 and Thr207 by active cyclin B1-cdc2 leads to possible autophosphorylation at Ser875 (Ser883 in Xenopus), which stabilizes the kinase. Activated Gwl phosphorylates α-Endosulfine (ENSA) and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) at Ser67 and Ser62, respectively. Phosphorylated ENSA and ARPP19 inhibit the activity of the B55 subunit-associated form of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55), allowing for complete phosphorylation of mitotic substrates by cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic entry. When Gwl is inactivated, PP2A-B55 reactivates, which leads to dephosphorylation of cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic exit (5,6, reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).