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Product listing: MMP-9 (D6O3H) XP® Rabbit mAb (PE Conjugate), UniProt ID P14780 #27647 to Phospho-Scribble (Ser1220) (D8A2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q14160 #12316

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MMP-9 (D6O3H) XP® Rabbit mAb #13667.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are a group of zinc-dependent enzymes that target extracellular proteins, including growth factors, cell surface receptors, adhesion molecules, and other proteases (1). Matrix metalloproteinases can be broadly categorized based on function and cellular localization, and include six distinct membrane-type (MT) metalloproteinases that share a transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmic tail (2). Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP14) is involved in regulating development, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and tumor progression (3-6). MT1-MMP and other metalloproteinases promote tumor cell invasion by accumulating in specialized structures known as invadopodia, which remodel the ECM and allow tumor cells to breach the basement membrane (7). The abundance and presence of MT1-MMP at the cell surface is controlled by targeted endocytosis, which may be regulated by the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic domain (8). MT1-MMP protease activity can be further regulated through homodimer formation, autocatalytic processing, domain shedding and the interaction with inhibitory proteins. Activation of the MT1-MMP proenzyme results from cleavage of full-length MT1-MMP by furin in the trans-Golgi network, which removes the inhibitory propeptide domain (9). At the cell surface, MT1-MMP can be found in a protein complex with the soluble metalloproteinase MMP2 and the MMP inhibitor TIMP2. MT1-MMP mediated cleavage and activation of MMP2 generates the active MMP2 collagenase, which plays important roles in ECM remodeling and tumor invasion (10). MT1-MMP interacts with a large number of substrates in addition to MMP2, including interstitial collagens, adhesive glycoproteins (i.e. laminin), and cell surface receptors (11).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated MUC1 (D9O8K) XP® Rabbit mAb #14161.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Mucins are a family of macromolecules that line and protect the respiratory epithelium from microbes and pollutants in the local environment. Of the family members that are known to date, some are produced in a cell type and tissue-specific manner, suggesting distinct biological roles for members. Some members polymerize after secretion to form gel-like substances that coat the epithelial layer. MUC5AC and MUC5B are members of the family that polymerize in this manner. Others do not polymerize, and others yet, have a transmembrane domain and remain physically attached to the epithelia (1). While it is known that mucins are protective to the respiratory epithelium, it has been reported that changes in expression of mucins are associated with several forms of lung disease such as cystic fibrosis, COPD, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and others (2,3,4,1). Multiple epithelial malignancies have been described to show changes in expression, localization, and glycosylation of MUC5AC. This wide association with multiple malignancy types has led to the emergence of MUC5AC as both a prognostic and therapeutic target for cancer (5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated N-Cadherin (D4R1H) XP® Rabbit mAb #13116.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated N-Cadherin (D4R1H) XP® Rabbit mAb #13116.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
200 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule, CD56) is an adhesion glycoprotein with five extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III repeats. Structural diversity is introduced by alternative splicing resulting in different cytoplasmic domains (1). NCAM mediates neuronal attachment, neurite extension and cell-cell interactions through homo and heterophilic interactions. PSA (polysialic acid) post-translationally modifies NCAM and increases the metastatic potential of small cell lung carcinoma, Wilms+ tumor, neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma (2). CD56 and CD16 are commonly used to identify NK cells although some cells with the T cell markers CD3 and CD4 also express CD56 (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Olfactomedin-4 (OLFM4, hGC-1) is a member of the Olfactomedin family, a small group of extracellular proteins defined by the presence of a conserved "Olfactomedin domain" that is thought to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). OLFM4 is a secreted glycoprotein, which forms disulfide bond-mediated oligomers, and is thought to mediate cell adhesion through its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins such as lectins (2). Human OLFM4 was first cloned from myeloid cells (3) and is expressed in a distinct subset of neutrophils, though the functional significance of this differential expression pattern remains unclear (4). Among normal tissues, the expression of OLFM4 protein is most abundant in intestinal crypts (5), where it has garnered attention as a possible marker of intestinal stem cells (6). Notably, OLFM4 expression is markedly increased in several tumor types, including colorectal, gastric, pancreas, lung, and breast (reviewed in [1]). Furthermore, research studies show that the expression levels of OLFM4 vary in relation to the severity and/or differentiation status of multiple tumor types (1, 6-8), leading to the suggestion that OLFM4 may have utility as a prognostic marker in some cancer patients (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Olfactomedin-4 (OLFM4, hGC-1) is a member of the Olfactomedin family, a small group of extracellular proteins defined by the presence of a conserved "Olfactomedin domain" that is thought to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). OLFM4 is a secreted glycoprotein, which forms disulfide bond-mediated oligomers, and is thought to mediate cell adhesion through its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins such as lectins (2). Human OLFM4 was first cloned from myeloid cells (3) and is expressed in a distinct subset of neutrophils, though the functional significance of this differential expression pattern remains unclear (4). Among normal tissues, the expression of OLFM4 protein is most abundant in intestinal crypts (5), where it has garnered attention as a possible marker of intestinal stem cells (6). Notably, OLFM4 expression is markedly increased in several tumor types, including colorectal, gastric, pancreas, lung, and breast (reviewed in [1]). Furthermore, research studies show that the expression levels of OLFM4 vary in relation to the severity and/or differentiation status of multiple tumor types (1, 6-8), leading to the suggestion that OLFM4 may have utility as a prognostic marker in some cancer patients (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p130 Cas (Crk-associated substrate) is a docking protein containing multiple protein-protein interaction domains. The amino-terminal SH3 domain may function as a molecular switch regulating CAS tyrosine phosphorylation, as it interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1) and the FAK-related kinase PYK2 (2), as well as the tyrosine phosphatases PTP-1B (3) and PTP-PEST (4). The carboxy-terminal Src binding domain (SBD) contains a proline-rich motif that mediates interaction with the SH3 domains of Src-family kinases (SFKs) and a tyrosine phosphorylation site (Tyr668 and/or Tyr670) that can promote interaction with the SH2 domain of SFKs (5). The p130 Cas central substrate domain, the major region of tyrosine phosphorylation, is characterized by 15 tyrosines present in Tyr-X-X-Pro (YXXP) motifs, including Tyr165, 249, and 410. When phosphorylated, most YXXP motifs are able to serve as docking sites for proteins with SH2 or PTB domains including adaptors, C-Crk, Nck, and inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) (6). The tyrosine phosphorylation of p130 Cas has been implicated as a key signaling step in integrin control of normal cellular behaviors including motility, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant Cas tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to cell transformation by certain oncoproteins (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p130 Cas (Crk-associated substrate) is a docking protein containing multiple protein-protein interaction domains. The amino-terminal SH3 domain may function as a molecular switch regulating CAS tyrosine phosphorylation, as it interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1) and the FAK-related kinase PYK2 (2), as well as the tyrosine phosphatases PTP-1B (3) and PTP-PEST (4). The carboxy-terminal Src binding domain (SBD) contains a proline-rich motif that mediates interaction with the SH3 domains of Src-family kinases (SFKs) and a tyrosine phosphorylation site (Tyr668 and/or Tyr670) that can promote interaction with the SH2 domain of SFKs (5). The p130 Cas central substrate domain, the major region of tyrosine phosphorylation, is characterized by 15 tyrosines present in Tyr-X-X-Pro (YXXP) motifs, including Tyr165, 249, and 410. When phosphorylated, most YXXP motifs are able to serve as docking sites for proteins with SH2 or PTB domains including adaptors, C-Crk, Nck, and inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) (6). The tyrosine phosphorylation of p130 Cas has been implicated as a key signaling step in integrin control of normal cellular behaviors including motility, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant Cas tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to cell transformation by certain oncoproteins (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PAI-1 is a secreted protein that belongs to the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. It inhibits urokinase and tissue plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA) and thus, reduces the conversion of inactive plasminogen to plasmin (1). PAI-1 regulates fibrinolysis and plays an important role in vessel patency and tissue remodeling. Secreted PAI-1 interacts with the extracellular matrix (ECM) component vitronectin, thereby modulating cell-ECM interactions (2,3). PAI-1 is expressed in a variety of tissues with higher expression in liver, vascular endothelial cells, platelets, macrophages, and adipose tissue (1). Increased levels of PAI-1 are associated with deep vein thrombosis (4). Defects in PAI-1 cause plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1D), which is characterized by increased bleeding after injury or surgery (5). Research studies have shown that high levels of PAI-1 are associated with obesity, aging, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (6-8). PAI-1 is transcriptionally regulated by TGF-β and mediates TGF-β-induced inhibition of cell migration and invasion in cancer cells (9). Studies have shown PAI-1 to be also involved in fibrosis (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The pannexin family (pannexin-1, -2, and -3; PANX1-3) of gap junction proteins has homology to the invertebrate innexins and display distinct expression patterns (1). Pannexin-1 is widely expressed, with highest expression in the heart, brain, skeletal muscle, testis, and ovary (1,2). Pannexin-2 is predominately expressed in the brain (1,2) and pannexin-3 is found within the skin and connective tissues (1,3). Connexin family gap junction proteins form hemichannels that align adjacent cells, creating functional intercellular channels that are permeable to ions and small molecules. In contrast, pannexin proteins may not function as gap junction proteins since pannexins on adjacent cells may not align to form complete channels (3). These pannexin “hemichannels” may play a role in inflammation, apoptosis, and neuronal signaling by allowing permeability of ions, ATP, and potentially other small molecules into the extracellular space (4-6). Pannexin-1 can be activated by effector caspases (caspase-3 and -7), which leads to release of signal molecules that promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paxillin is a multidomain protein that localizes primarily to focal adhesion sites in the extracellular matrix (1). Paxillin is one of the key components of integrin signaling, and tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is required for integrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization (2). Paxillin is phosphorylated by another focal adhesion component, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), at Tyr118 (3,4). Phospho-Paxillin (Tyr118) may provide a docking site for recruitment of other signaling molecules to focal adhesions. It has been shown that the SH2 domain of Crk binds to the phosphorylated Tyr118 of paxillin (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CUB domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1, SIMA135) is a putative stem cell marker shown in research studies to be highly expressed in some human cancer cells and in both typical and atypical (cancerous) colons (1). Expression of CDCP1 may be epigenetically regulated, as methylation of promoter CpG sequences results in decreased CDCP1 expression (2). The corresponding CDCP1 gene encodes a glycoprotein that acts as a complex, multidomain transmembrane antigen. CDCP1 has three extracellular CUB domains that may be involved in cell adhesion or extracellular matrix interactions (1,3). Src-family kinases may phosphorylate CDCP1 at five tyrosine residues within its cytoplasmic domain to provide a potential binding site for SH2 domain-containing proteins (3). CDCP1 is a putative hematopoietic stem cell marker (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a member of the large family of gap junction proteins. Connexins assemble as a hexamer and are transported to the plasma membrane to create a hemichannel that can associate with hemichannels on nearby cells to create cell-to-cell channels. Clusters of these channels assemble to make gap junctions. Gap junction communication is important in development and regulation of cell growth. Phosphorylation of Cx43 is important in regulating assembly and function of gap junctions (1,2). Ser368 of Cx43 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) after activation by phorbol esters, which decreases cell-to-cell communication (3). Src can interact with and phosphorylate Cx43 to alter gap junction communication (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are highly conserved, ubiquitous scaffold proteins involved in localized signaling to help regulate focal contact assembly and cytoskeletal dynamics. GIT proteins contain multiple interaction domains that allow interaction with small GTPases (including ARF, Rac, and cdc42), kinases (such as PAK and MEK), the Rho family GEF Pix, and the focal adhesion protein paxillin (reviewed in 1). GIT1 and GIT2 share many of the same properties, but with at least ten distinct, tissue-specific splice variants. GIT2 has been shown to play an important role inhibiting focal adhesion turnover and membrane protrusion (2,3). Focal adhesion localization and paxillin binding of GIT2 is regulated through phosphorylation at one or more tyrosine sites (Tyr286, Tyr392, Tyr592) by FAK and/or Src (4,5,reviewed in 6). Once at the focal adhesion, GIT2 is thought to play a key role in cell polarity and migration, making it a protein of interest in the investigation of oncogenic signaling pathways (3,5,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Scribble (Scrib) was originally identified in a genetic screen in Drosophila along with cell polarity determinants Discs Large (Dlg) and Lethal giant larvae (Lgl). Drosophila mutants homozygous for these genes share similar phenotypes, including the loss of apicobasal cell polarity and neoplastic tissue overgrowth. These phenotypic similarities suggest that these three proteins function in a common pathway important for establishing and maintaining apicobasal polarity in epithelial cells (1,2). Scribble contains many leucine-rich repeats and PDZ domains important for localizing scribble to adherens junctions and basolateral regions of mammalian epithelial cells (3). Scribble reportedly binds β-catenin, APC, E-cadherin and the E6 protein from high-risk virus type of HPV through a short motif important for E6-induced cell transformation (4-8). Overexpression of scribble inhibits transformation of rodent epithelial cells by HPV E6/7 proteins (8).