Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: CDK12 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9NYV4 #11973 to Ku70 (V540) Antibody, UniProt ID P12956 #4104

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12/CRKRS/CRK7) is composed of a central CTD kinase domain, several proline-rich regions, and several amino-terminal arginine/serine (RS) motifs common to splicing factors (1). CDK12 is ubiquitously expressed and forms a complex with cyclin K that regulates phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (1-4). CDK12 is important for expression of a subset of long genes with high numbers of exons including some regulators of the DNA damage response, such as breast and ovarian cancer type 1 susceptibility protein 1 (BRCA1) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) (3). Depletion of CDK12 results in spontaneous DNA damage and increased sensitivity to DNA damage agents (3). Research studies have shown that CDK12 is recurrently mutated in high-grade ovarian cancer (5,6). In addition, high levels of CDK12 are required to maintain pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is a complex of CDK7 and cyclin H. The complex is involved in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating an activating residue in the T-loop domain of cdks (1). Regulation of CAK activity is mediated by T-loop phosphorylation and by association with MAT1, both of which enhance its kinase activity toward the CTD of RNA polymerase II (2,3) and other substrates such as p53 (4). CAK is an essential component of the transcription complex TFIIH and may interact directly with TFIIH helicases (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian Mediator Complex is a multi-subunit protein complex that couples specific transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the basal transcription machinery. Interactions between distinct Mediator subunits and transcription factors allow for specific gene regulation (reviewed in 1).Mediator complex interactions control various biological processes, including insulin signaling (2), NF-κB-dependent signaling (3), stem cell pluripotency and self renewal (4,5), and proliferation of colon cancer cells (6,7).CDK8/Cyclin C, along with Med12 and Med13, constitute a subcomplex within the Mediator Complex thought to act as a molecular switch, inhibiting Pol II recruitment and transcription initiation (8,9). Expression of CDK8 abrogates E2F-1-dependent inhibition of β-catenin activity in colon cancer cells (9). High levels of CDK8 coincide with high β-catenin-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells, and their proliferation can be inhibited by suppressing CDK8 expression (8).CDK8 can phosphorylate Ser727 on STAT1, which reduces natural killer (NK) cell toxicity (10,11). As such, inhibitors are being pursued as potential therapeutics to enhance NK cell activity and combat a variety of cancer types (12,13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian Mediator Complex is a multi-subunit protein complex that couples specific transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the basal transcription machinery. Interactions between distinct Mediator subunits and transcription factors allow for specific gene regulation (reviewed in 1).Mediator complex interactions control various biological processes, including insulin signaling (2), NF-κB-dependent signaling (3), stem cell pluripotency and self renewal (4,5), and proliferation of colon cancer cells (6,7).CDK8/Cyclin C, along with Med12 and Med13, constitute a subcomplex within the Mediator Complex thought to act as a molecular switch, inhibiting Pol II recruitment and transcription initiation (8,9). Expression of CDK8 abrogates E2F-1-dependent inhibition of β-catenin activity in colon cancer cells (9). High levels of CDK8 coincide with high β-catenin-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells, and their proliferation can be inhibited by suppressing CDK8 expression (8).CDK8 can phosphorylate Ser727 on STAT1, which reduces natural killer (NK) cell toxicity (10,11). As such, inhibitors are being pursued as potential therapeutics to enhance NK cell activity and combat a variety of cancer types (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome, and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of prereplication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The prereplication complex (Pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. The MCM complex is thought to be the replicative helicase, and formation of the pre-RC is referred to as chromatin licensing. Subsequent initiation of DNA replication requires the activation of the S-phase promoting kinases CDK2 and cdc7. Cdc7, which is active only in complex with its regulatory subunit dbf4, phosphorylates MCM proteins bound to chromatin and allows binding of the replication factor cdc45 and DNA polymerase (3,4).Binding of CDT1 to geminin prevents pre-RC formation, and expression and degradation of geminin serve to regulate CDT1 activity (reviewed in 5). The interaction of CDT1 with MCM proteins is important in pre-RC formation and licensing (6,7). Both cdc6 and CDT1 are degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in response to DNA damage associated with rereplication (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E) is a kinesin-like motor protein and mitotic-checkpoint kinase BUB1B binding partner that is essential for establishing and maintaining stable attachments between mitotic chromosomes and spindle microtubules (1). CENP-E plays an important role as a motor protein in the alignment of chromosomes during prometaphase (2). Research studies indicate that CENP-E protein expression peaks in late G2 and M-phases of the cell cycle before the protein is degraded at mitotic exit (3). Additional studies show that the loss of CENP-E function results in cell cycle arrest in mitosis. Mutations in the corresponding CENPE gene can result in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly-13, a developmental disorder characterized by small head circumference, dysmorphic facial features, short stature, and delayed psychomotor development (4). Since CENP-E is essential for mitotic progression and is required for cellular proliferation, it has become an interesting target for cancer therapy (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly, and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4).CENP-A is regarded as the epigenetic mark of the centromere that persists through cell generations (5). Although its presence is necessary, it is not sufficient for formation of functional kinetochores (6). CENP-T, in complex with CENP-W, has recently been shown to form a histone fold, a structure that is capable of association with DNA, and target DNA to the kinetochore (7). Kinetochore attachment is mediated by a long flexible N-terminal region that has been shown to interact with outer proteins of the kinetochore complex (reviewed in 8). Moreover, the CENP-T-W complex has also been shown to interact with the CENP-S-X dimer, to form a heterotetrameric complex that has structural and potentially functional similarity to canonical histones (8). Since CENP-S-X are conserved kinetochore localized proteins, this new complex has been suggested to be a novel centromeric histone.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Checkpoint with forkhead and RING finger domains protein (CHFR) is an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase that regulates cell cycle progression. In response to microtubule stress, CHFR delays the transition into mitosis by excluding cyclin B1 from the nucleus prior to chromosome condensation (1). Marked reduction of CHFR expression was detected in primary tumors and decreased CHFR expression was linked to promoter hypermethylation (1-4). Restoration of CHFR expression by treatment with the microtubule stress agent nocodazole and the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine has been reported (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CK2 (formerly called Casein Kinase II) is a highly conserved protein kinase with more than 300 substrates regulating cell growth, cell death, and cell survival. CK2 has been implicated in the response to UV irradiation-induced DNA damage, targeting XRCC1 (1) and BRCA1 (2) as well as regulating p53 tumor suppressor protein functions (3). Furthermore, CK2 plays a key role in NF-κB activation (4). UV irradiation stimulates CK2-mediated phosphorylation of several carboxy-terminal residues within IκBα, resulting in IκBα proteasomal degradation and the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB. CK2 is also dysregulated in many cancers (5) and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases (6). Structurally, CK2 is a multimeric protein complex consisting of two catalytic subunits (α or α') and two regulatory β subunits (7). CK2 is distributed ubiquitously and is apparently constitutively active (7). While cell cycle-dependent Ser-Pro phosphorylation sites have been identified on CK2α and CK2β, Tyr255 phosphorylation by the Src-related kinase c-Fgr seems to have the greatest effect on CK2α activity (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Originally identified in Xenopus (1), and later in human cells (2), claspin is a mediator of Chk1 signal transduction at the replication checkpoint and in response to DNA damage. Expression of claspin is cell cycle-regulated, with protein levels peaking at the S/G2 phase (2). Expression is negatively regulated by both proteosome- and caspase-mediated degradation (3), and stabilized by activation of Chk1 (4). Claspin is a chromatin-bound protein, and has been shown to interact with the PNCA complex in the absence of DNA damage (5). Following checkpoint activation it remains chromatin-bound but is released from the PCNA complex and is phosphorylated in an ATR-dependent manner. Phosphorylated claspin interacts with several components of the DNA damage response including BRCA1 (6) and Chk1 (7), leading to ATR-dependent phosphorylation on each of these proteins. Phosphorylated Rad17 has also been shown to bind to and regulate the phosphorylation of claspin (8). It has been proposed that claspin behaves as a tumor suppressor in come cases since down-regulation promotes apoptosis following genotoxic stress (2). Conversely, claspin seems to behave as an oncogene in other instances since overexpression promotes cellular proliferation (6). Upregulated claspin has been suggested to be a sensitive marker of abnormally proliferating cells (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The centrosome is an organelle that plays an important role in the mammalian cell cycle. Prior to the onset of mitosis, the single interphase centrosome duplicates only once, creating a pair of daughter centrosomes that will form the two spindle poles after breakdown of the nuclear envelope. Failure to duplicate or overduplication of the centrosome can result in polyploidy and genomic instability (reviewed in 1). Centrosomal protein of 110 kDa (CP110) is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) substrate that plays a critical role in promoting the duplication of centrosomes and correct spindle formation (2). In addition, CP110 has been shown to interact with calmodulin (CaM) and centrin to regulate the progression through cytokinesis (3), and with Cep97 and Cep290 to regulate the formation of primary cilia (4,5). CP110 expression is induced in G1/S with peak expression during S-phase. Degradation of CP110 is mediated by cyclin F in G2-phase and is required for normal progression into M-phase (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CUE domain-containing 2 (CUEDC2) protein is involved in regulating many cellular events including cell cycle regulation (1) and inflammation (2). Research studies have shown that CUEDC2 is highly expressed in many types of tumors, suggesting this protein may play a role in tumorigenesis (1,3). CUEDC2 is activated in early mitosis when it is phosphorylated by Cdk1 at Ser110. Phosphorylated CUEDC2 binds to Cdc20, which leads to the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) from checkpoint inhibition, initiating anaphase. CUEDC2 is then dephosphorylated when cells exit mitosis (1). CUEDC2 is also an inhibitor of IKKα and IKKβ activation (2) as well as Jak1/Stat3 signaling (4). Research indicates that inappropriate regulation of CUEDC2 may contribute to tumor development by causing chromosome instability (1). Multiple studies have reported that CUEDC2 plays a role in the downregulation of progesterone receptor and estrogen receptor α, impairing the effects of progesterone on breast cancer cell growth. Conversely, research studies have shown that CUEDC2 and HER2 expression have a significant positive correlation in breast cancers, leading investigators to suggest that CUEDC2 could be an important target for breast cancer therapy (3,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation, by the abundance of their cyclin partners (the D-type cyclins), and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of cyclin D/CDK4 and p27 Kip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27 concomitant with a rise in cyclin D levels to affect progression through the restriction point and Rb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of cyclin D/CDK4 targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). Levels of cyclin D protein drop upon withdrawal of growth factors through downregulation of protein expression and phosphorylation-dependent degradation (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 can associate with and activate CDK2 (1). Upon DNA damage, upregulation/activation of the CDK inhibitors p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1 prevent cyclin E/CDK2 activation, resulting in G1/S arrest. When conditions are favorable for cell cycle progression, cyclin D/CDK4/6 phosphorylates Rb and is thought to reduce the activity of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1, allowing subsequent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 (1,2). Cyclin E/CDK2 further phosphorylates Rb to allow progression into S-phase, where cyclin E/CDK2 is thought to phosphorylate and activate multiple proteins involved in DNA synthesis (2,3). Turnover of cyclin E is largely controlled by phosphorylation that results in SCFFbw7-mediated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation (4,5). Cyclin E1 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo including Thr62, Ser88, Ser72, Thr380 and Ser384, and is controlled by at least two kinases, CDK2 and GSK-3 (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin H belongs to a conserved cyclin family that plays a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle dependent kinases (CDKs) necessary for cell cycle progression (1,2). In general, the activity of CDKs requires the binding of appropriate cyclins as well as phosphorylation driven by Cdk-activating kinase (CAK). Cyclin H is part of the CAK complex that includes the kinase CDK7, and an assembly factor p36/Mat1, which enhances binding between cyclin H and CDK7 and increases activity (3,4). CAK regulates progression through the cell cycle by activating cdc2, CDK2, and CDK4 kinases through phosphorylation of a critical threonine residue in the T-loop of the CDK-cyclin complexes (5,6). The CAK complex can exist either in its free form or in association with transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) which can affect its substrate specificity (7,8,9). When bound to TFIIH, CAK preferentially phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (9), providing a link between cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The E2F transcription factors are essential for regulation of the cell cycle (1,2). Physiological E2F is a heterodimer composed of an E2F subunit together with a DP subunit (3, 4). Six members of the E2F family have been identified, and each E2F subunit has a DNA binding and a dimerization domain. E2F-1 to -5 activate transcription. E2F-1 to -3 bind pRb, and E2F-4 and -5 bind p107 or p130, and these interactions are under cell cycle control (5-8). E2F-1 has oncogenic properties in vivo and in vitro. E2F-1 can induce apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E2F-1 is stress-responsive, and is regulated by a PI3-kinase-like kinase family such as the ATM/ATR kinases (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eg5 (also called kinesin-like protein 11 or Kif11) belongs to the kinesin-like family of motor proteins important in chromosome positioning, centrosome separation, and mitotic spindle formation. Phosphorylation of Eg5 by mitotic kinases regulates its activity by modulating its association with microtubules (1,2). Because anti-mitotic chemotherapeutic drugs, such as taxanes, target microtubules and have pleiotropic and sometimes toxic effects, drugs that target microtubule-associated proteins such as Eg5 are currently in development (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitotic control is important for normal growth, development, and maintenance of all eukaryotic cells. Research studies have demonstrated that inappropriate control of mitosis can lead to genomic instability and cancer (reviewed in 1,2). A regulator of mitosis, Greatwall kinase (Gwl), was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (3). Subsequent studies showed that, based on sequence homology and function, microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) is the human ortholog of Gwl (4). Regulation of MASTL/Gwl activation has been shown to be critical for the correct timing of mitosis. Research studies have shown that Gwl is activated by hyperphosphorylation (5). The phosphorylation of human Gwl at Thr194 and Thr207 by active cyclin B1-cdc2 leads to possible autophosphorylation at Ser875 (Ser883 in Xenopus), which stabilizes the kinase. Activated Gwl phosphorylates α-Endosulfine (ENSA) and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) at Ser67 and Ser62, respectively. Phosphorylated ENSA and ARPP19 inhibit the activity of the B55 subunit-associated form of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55), allowing for complete phosphorylation of mitotic substrates by cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic entry. When Gwl is inactivated, PP2A-B55 reactivates, which leads to dephosphorylation of cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic exit (5,6, reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) is a structure-specific nuclease with multiple functions in DNA processing pathways (1,2). The replication and DNA repair activities of FEN-1 are critical for genomic stability in the eukaryotic cell. Through interaction with proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), FEN-1 helps coordinate Okazaki fragment maturation by removing RNA-DNA primers (3). FEN-1 is also required for non-homologous end joining of double stranded DNA breaks in long patch base excision repair (4,5). The multi-functional activities of FEN-1 are regulated by various mechanisms, including protein partner interactions (6,7), post-translational modifications (8,9), and subcellular re-localization in response to cell cycle or DNA damage (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. Once this complex is formed, the origin is “licensed” for initiation of DNA replication. In order to ensure that replication occurs only once per cell cycle, geminin binds to and inhibits CDT1 during the S, G2 and M phases. This prevents the recruitment of the MCM complex to the origins of replication, which blocks the premature reformation of the Pre-RC. At the metaphase/anaphase transition, geminin is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) allowing for the formation of new pre-RC (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) enzymes HR6A and HR6B are the mammalian orthologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad6 gene products (1). In S. cerevisiae, Rad6 facilitates cell cycle progression and ubiquitinates histone H2B (2,3). In vivo phosphorylation of HR6A Ser120 by cyclin-dependent kinases is thought to be important for the coordination and timing of ubiquitination events involved in cell cycle progression (4). In response to DNA damage, HR6A is known to interact physically with p53 and p14ARF, but knockout mice lacking HR6A or HR6B exhibit normal DNA damage responses (5,6). HR6B knockout males exhibit defective spermatogenesis, while HR6A knockout females fail to produce viable offspring (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: INCENP (inner centromere protein antigens 135 kDa, 155 kDa) is a chromosomal passenger protein crucial for multiple events that mediate chromosome separation during mitosis (1). At prophase INCENP is associated with chromatin whereas during prometaphase and metaphase it translocates to the inner centromere (1). Depletion of INCENP results in aberrant chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, incomplete chromosome separation, and disruption of proper spindle formation and cytokinesis (2). INCENP is part of the chromosomal passenger complex that also contains Aurora B, borealin and survivin (2). Aurora B and INCENP are mutually dependent on each other for proper localization (3), and in Drosophila cells and C.elegans embryos that lack INCENP or survivin, Aurora B cannot organize the kinetochores and the midbody (4,5). Phosphorylation on INCENP by CDK1 on Thr59 and Thr388 leads to the association of INCENP with Plk1, another important regulator of mitotic entry and exit (6). Interaction of INCENP with Plk1 is necessary for recruitment of Plk1 to the kinetochores, and the metaphase to anaphase transition (6). Interactions have also been reported between INCENP and heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1) (7) and β-tubulin (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: INCENP (inner centromere protein antigens 135 kDa, 155 kDa) is a chromosomal passenger protein crucial for multiple events that mediate chromosome separation during mitosis (1). At prophase INCENP is associated with chromatin whereas during prometaphase and metaphase it translocates to the inner centromere (1). Depletion of INCENP results in aberrant chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, incomplete chromosome separation, and disruption of proper spindle formation and cytokinesis (2). INCENP is part of the chromosomal passenger complex that also contains Aurora B, borealin and survivin (2). Aurora B and INCENP are mutually dependent on each other for proper localization (3), and in Drosophila cells and C.elegans embryos that lack INCENP or survivin, Aurora B cannot organize the kinetochores and the midbody (4,5). Phosphorylation on INCENP by CDK1 on Thr59 and Thr388 leads to the association of INCENP with Plk1, another important regulator of mitotic entry and exit (6). Interaction of INCENP with Plk1 is necessary for recruitment of Plk1 to the kinetochores, and the metaphase to anaphase transition (6). Interactions have also been reported between INCENP and heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1) (7) and β-tubulin (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.