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Product listing: Phospho-Zyxin (Ser142/143) (D1E8) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q15942 #8467 to YKL-40 (E2L1M) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P36222 #47066

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The zyxin family of proteins includes LIMD1, ajuba, trip6 and zyxin, each of which contains three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus. Zyxin family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton and are components of both the cell-cell junction adhesive complex and the integrin-mediated adhesive complex. They shuttle in and out of the nucleus where they may function in transcriptional activation (1).Zyxin is involved in the regulation of mechanical force-induced actin polymerization at focal adhesions (2), and in regulation of adhesion and migration, possibly through recruitment of Ena/VASP proteins to focal adhesions (3). Zyxin interacts with and may regulate the function of the tumor suppressor myopodin, which inhibits tumor growth and metastasis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through focal adhesion complexes, which contain integrins, as well as multiple adaptor and signaling proteins (1). The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) adaptor complex acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).PINCH, also known as LIMS1, has been shown to function as a specific regulator of gene expression in glomerular podocytes in response to TGF-β1 (4). Researchers have shown that PINCH is highly expressed in some human tumors, and that PINCH can promote resistance to ionizing radiation through activation of Akt (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Plectin is a large, widely expressed protein that crosslinks the intermediate filament and actin cytoskeleton, mechanically stabilizing cells and tissues. Plectin also plays a role in the regulation of actin dynamics and acts as a scaffold for signaling molecules (1). Plectin is important in the stabilization of hemidesmosomes, crosslinking them to the intermediate filament network. Research studies have shown that mutations in plectin and other genes coding for hemidesmosomal proteins can cause epidermolysis bullosa, a condition manifested by fragile skin and frequent blistering (1,2). Plectin modulates signals to PKC through binding and sequestration of RACK1, the receptor for activated C kinase 1 (3,4). Plectin is also involved in the regulation of cytokeratin architecture and cell stress response (4), signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (5) and regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and signaling in mouse myotubes (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PSA/KLK3 (D6B1) XP® Rabbit mAb #5365.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTP-PEST is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase with multiple proline-rich regions that appear to be the docking sites for PTP-PEST binding partners or substrates (1). PTP-PEST regulates fibroblast adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis through its association with and dephosphorylation of p130 Cas, paxillin, PSTPIP1, WASP, and other adhesion molecules (1-5). By modulating phosphorylation states of Shc, Pyk2, Fak, and WASP, PTP-PEST negatively regulates lymphocyte activation (1,6). In mammary epithelial cells, EGF facilitates the dephosphorylation of Jak2 by PTP-PEST, thereby interfering with lactogenic hormone PRL signaling (7). PTP-PEST dephosphorylates c-Abl as well, which affects the phosphorylation states of PTP-PEST substrates such as paxillin, p130 Cas, Crk, and PSTPIP1 (8).PTP-PEST regulates adhesion and motility of cultured epithelial cells through modulation of Rho GTPase activity (9), and is required for integrin-mediated endothelial cell adhesion and migration (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTP-PEST is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase with multiple proline-rich regions that appear to be the docking sites for PTP-PEST binding partners or substrates (1). PTP-PEST regulates fibroblast adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis through its association with and dephosphorylation of p130 Cas, paxillin, PSTPIP1, WASP, and other adhesion molecules (1-5). By modulating phosphorylation states of Shc, Pyk2, Fak, and WASP, PTP-PEST negatively regulates lymphocyte activation (1,6). In mammary epithelial cells, EGF facilitates the dephosphorylation of Jak2 by PTP-PEST, thereby interfering with lactogenic hormone PRL signaling (7). PTP-PEST dephosphorylates c-Abl as well, which affects the phosphorylation states of PTP-PEST substrates such as paxillin, p130 Cas, Crk, and PSTPIP1 (8).PTP-PEST regulates adhesion and motility of cultured epithelial cells through modulation of Rho GTPase activity (9), and is required for integrin-mediated endothelial cell adhesion and migration (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motif) is a GPI-anchored membrane glycoprotein that negatively regulates members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family and functions as a suppressor of transformation (1,2). Its function in MMP inhibition makes RECK a crucial factor in the regulation of extracellular matrix formation and stability during development (2-4). RECK has also been linked to the regulation of other extracellar matrix proteases such as ADAM10 and CD13 and functions in modulating target protein endocytosis and Notch signaling (5,6). RECK is widely expressed in normal tissue and decreased expression of RECK due to promoter methylation has been correlated with tumor transformation, angiogenesis and metastasis (1,7-9). Therefore, loss of RECK expression serves as a prognostic hallmark for cancer malignancy (10,11)

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: SHP-substrate 1 (SHPS1, SIRPα) is a single-pass membrane protein and member of both the immunoglobulin superfamily and the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) family. Following growth hormone stimulation or integrin binding, SHPS1 is phosphorylated at several tyrosine residues within its cytoplasmic tail. These phosphorylation events promote association between SHPS1 and multiple signaling proteins, including SHP-1, SHP-2, Grb2 and Shc via their SH2 domains (1-4). Recruitment of SHP-1 and SHP-2 results in SHPS1 dephosphorylation and suppression of tyrosine kinase signaling (1-3,5). The tyrosine kinase JAK2 associates with SHPS1 via its carboxy terminus and phosphorylates SHPS1 in response to extracellular stimuli (5). Research studies show that Src associates with and may phosphorylate SHPS1 in response to insulin (4). In macrophages, SHPS1 can form a complex with the Src pathway adaptor protein SKAP2, Fyn-binding protein FYB, and the tyrosine kinase PYK2 (6). The SHPS1 extracellular domain contains at least three IgG-like domains that interact with CD47, a ubiquitously expressed, integrin-associated protein that acts as a repressive cue in both immune and neuronal cells (7,8). The interaction between CD47 and SHPS1 on opposing cells can inhibit cellular migration (9), promote "tethering" between macrophages and target cells during engulfment (10), facilitate self versus non-self recognition (11), and maintain immune homeostasis (12). SHPS1 plays a critical role in modulating the immune response and inflammation, and may play a role in neuronal development (13,14). The interaction between SHPS1 and CD47 may be an exploitable target in cancer therapy (15-17).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Syndecan 1 (D4Y7H) Rabbit mAb #12922.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TROP2 is a transmembrane glycoprotein encoded by gene TACSTD2 (tumor associated calcium signal transducer 2). TROP2 was first discovered as a biomarker of invasive trophoblast cells and later reported in many types of cancer cells as well as in various organs during development, and adult stem cells during homeostasis (1, 2). TROP2 has an extracellular domain with EGF thyroglobulin type-1 repeats, a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail with a HIKE domain containing a PIP2 binding site and PKC phosphoryaltion site (Ser303) (1-4). TROP2 functions by regulating multiple signaling pathways including-interaction of extracellular domain with integrin beta1 to regulate FAK signaling, association of its transmembrane domain with claudin1 and claudin7 for tight junction formation, as well as regulation of intracellular calcium release by its PIP2 binding and activation of the ERK/MAPK pathway (1,2, 5-8). All of these functions are important for its role in tumor proliferation, metastasis and invasion (1,2). PKC can phosphorylate TROP2 at Ser303; the phosphorylation changes the cytoplasmic tail conformation and further promotes its signaling (9). TROP2 can be activated through intramembrane proteolysis first by TACE, followed further cleavage by presenilin 1 and presenilin2. The proteolysis process is required for its role in tumor cell proliferation (10,11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesions connect the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex structure of secreted macromolecules that surrounds mammalian organs and tissues. Integrins clustered on the extracellular side of focal adhesions signal from the ECM to intracellular protein complexes, which in turn signal to the actin cytoskeleton to regulate the tension needed for cell motility. Internal signals also converge on focal adhesions to regulate integrin affinity and avidity. Signaling through focal adhesions regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression, and impacts cellular processes such as development, wound healing, immune response, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis (reviewed in 1-3). Talin is a large, multidomain focal adhesion protein that interacts with the intracellular domains of integrins and other focal adhesion proteins. Talin is involved in the formation of focal adhesions and in linking focal adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton (4). The interaction between talin and integrins increases the affinity between integrin and both insoluble and soluble ECM proteins (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adhesive glycoprotein thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, TSP1) localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mediates interactions between cells and the ECM and among cells. Thrombospondin-1 is a multi-domain, glycosylated protein that interacts with a wide variety of extracellular targets, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), collagens, cell receptors, growth factors, and cytokines (1). The protein structure of THBS1 includes an amino-terminal laminin G-like domain, a von Willebrand factor-binding domain, and multiple thrombospondin (TSP) repeated sequences designated as type I, type II, or type III repeats. Each thrombospondin domain interacts with a distinct type of cell surface ligands or protein targets. The amino-terminal domain interacts with aggrecan, heparin, and integrin proteins. Type I TSP repeats interact with MMPs and CD36, while carboxy-terminal repeats bind the thrombospondin receptor CD47 (1). Through these interactions, THBS1 exerts diverse effects on different signaling pathways, such as VEGF receptor/NO signaling, TGFβ signaling, and the NF-κB pathway (2-5). Thrombospondin-1 is an important regulator of many biological processes, including cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular function, and cancer development (2-5). The activity of thrombospondin-1 is mainly regulated by extracellular proteases. The metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 cleaves thrombospondin, resulting in the release of peptides with anti-angiogenic properties. Elastase and plasmin proteases degrade the THBS1 protein and down regulate its activity (6). As THBS1 is an important protein inhibitor of angiogenesis, the development of thrombospondin-based compounds and their use in therapeutic studies may provide a beneficial approach to the treatment of cancer (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that includes TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding to their catalytic zinc cofactor and resultant inhibition of proteinase function (1,2). In addition to MMP inhibition, TIMPs have also been shown to interact with various membrane receptors on the cell surface. Some of these interactions include: TIMP1 with CD63, TIMP2 with α3β1 integrin, and TIMP3 with VEGFR2, all of which result in distinct cellular effects (3). TIMPs are involved in a wide variety of biological functions, such as tumor angiogenesis and progression (4,5), wound healing, and vascular remodeling (6,7). Mutations in TIMP3 are associated with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that includes TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding to their catalytic zinc cofactor and resultant inhibition of proteinase function (1,2). In addition to MMP inhibition, TIMPs have also been shown to interact with various membrane receptors on the cell surface. Some of these interactions include: TIMP1 with CD63, TIMP2 with α3β1 integrin, and TIMP3 with VEGFR2, all of which result in distinct cellular effects (3). TIMPs are involved in a wide variety of biological functions, such as tumor angiogenesis and progression (4,5), wound healing, and vascular remodeling (6,7). Mutations in TIMP3 are associated with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that includes TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding to their catalytic zinc cofactor and resultant inhibition of proteinase function (1,2). In addition to MMP inhibition, TIMPs have also been shown to interact with various membrane receptors on the cell surface. Some of these interactions include: TIMP1 with CD63, TIMP2 with α3β1 integrin, and TIMP3 with VEGFR2, all of which result in distinct cellular effects (3). TIMPs are involved in a wide variety of biological functions, such as tumor angiogenesis and progression (4,5), wound healing, and vascular remodeling (6,7). Mutations in TIMP3 are associated with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a 55-65 kDa, highly glycosylated, GPI-anchored cell surface receptor (the deglycosylated protein is 35 kDa) (1-3). It is a central player in the plasminogen activation pathway. uPAR binds with high affinity to a serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and converts plasminogen to its active form plasmin in a spatially restricted manner on the cell surface (4). Plasmin further carries out the activation of uPA, which is inhibited by serpins, such as plasminogen activator inhibitors (5). Therefore, uPAR plays a key role in regulating extracellular proteolysis. In addition, uPAR plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation, adhesion and mobility (6,7). Research studies have shown that overexpression of uPAR is found in various cancer cells and tissues (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a 55-65 kDa, highly glycosylated, GPI-anchored cell surface receptor (the deglycosylated protein is 35 kDa) (1-3). It is a central player in the plasminogen activation pathway. uPAR binds with high affinity to a serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and converts plasminogen to its active form plasmin in a spatially restricted manner on the cell surface (4). Plasmin further carries out the activation of uPA, which is inhibited by serpins, such as plasminogen activator inhibitors (5). Therefore, uPAR plays a key role in regulating extracellular proteolysis. In addition, uPAR plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation, adhesion and mobility (6,7). Research studies have shown that overexpression of uPAR is found in various cancer cells and tissues (8,9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated VE-Cadherin (D87F2) XP® Rabbit mAb #2500.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Pig

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vinculin (E1E9V) XP® Rabbit mAb #13901.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: YKL-40, also known as Chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1), is a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the CHI3L1 gene (1,2). Unlike other members of the chitinase-like protein family, YKL-40 is not an active chitinase. It is produced by activated macrophages, chondrocytes, neutrophils, and synovial cells. It is a pro-inflammatory molecule that contributes to the progression of many inflammatory diseases, including fibrosis, neurodegenerative disease, breast, lung, prostate, liver, bladder, colon, and other types of cancers (3,4). Levels of YKL-40 in serum and plasma in patients with various types of tumors have been reported to predict poor prognosis, and in some clinical assays YKL-40 is being used as a predictive biomarker of cancer outcome (4).