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Product listing: BAF Complex Antibody Sampler Kit II, UniProt ID O14497 #58214 to SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit #95176

The BAF Complex Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means of detecting levels of various BAF complex components. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.
$65
1 ml
$296
5 x 1ml
5 ml
The SimpleChIP® Universal qPCR Master Mix is an optimized 2X reaction mix for real-time qPCR detection and quantitation of target DNA sequences using the SYBR/FAM channel of most real-time qPCR instruments. It contains Hot Start Taq DNA Polymerase and has been formulated with a unique passive reference dye that is compatible across a variety of instrument platforms (including those that require a high or low ROX reference signal). It also features dUTP for carryover prevention and a non-fluorescent, visible dye to monitor reaction setup. This dye does not spectrally overlap with fluorescent dyes used for qPCR and will not interfere with real-time detection.This product is provided in 1 ml volumes sufficient for preparation of 100 qPCR reactions, and is compatible with both enzymatic and sonication-fragmented DNA samples from SimpleChIP® enzymatic and sonication ChIP kits. This master mix formulation is supplied at 2X concentration and contains all PCR components required for amplification and quantitation of DNA, except primers and a DNA template.
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Background: Dye-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) uses real-time fluorescence of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dye, most commonly SYBR® Green I, to measure DNA amplification as it occurs during each cycle of PCR. At a point where the fluorescence signal is confidently detected over the background fluorescence, a quantification cycle, or CT value, can be determined. CT values can be used to evaluate relative target abundance between two or more samples, or to calculate absolute target quantities in reference to an appropriate standard curve, derived from a series of known dilutions. qPCR is commonly used to detect and quantify target genes in genomic DNA that is enriched by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP).

Molecular Weight:302.4 g/mol

Background: Trichostatin A is an antifungal antibiotic derived from Streptomyces that inhibits mammalian histone deacetylases (1,2). When used at nanomolar concentrations, trichostatin A causes the accumulation of acetylated histones in a quite specific and reversible manner (2,3). Trichostatin A has also been shown to inhibit both G1- and G2-phases of the mammalian cell cycle and has been tested for use as a potential anticancer agent (2-5).

$714
24 assays
1 Kit
Next generation sequencing (NG-seq) is a high throughput method that can be used downstream of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to identify and quantify target DNA enrichment across the entire genome. The SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq DNA Library Prep Kit for Illumina® contains all of the enzymes and buffers necessary to generate high quality DNA sequencing libraries from ChIP DNA for next-generation sequencing on the Illumina® platform. The fast, user-friendly workflow minimizes hands-on time needed for generation and purification of DNA libraries. This product must be used in combination with SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Single Index Primers) #29580 or SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Dual Index Primers) #47538.This product provides sufficient amounts of reagents for 24 reactions and is compatible with both enzymatic- and sonication-fragmented, ChIP-enriched DNA. This product is compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003, SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9005, and SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication Chromatin IP Kit #56383. This product is not compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9002 and SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9004 because agarose beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which will contaminate DNA library preps and NG-seq.
REACTIVITY
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Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$561
96 assays
1 Kit
Next generation sequencing (NG-seq) is a high throughput method that can be used downstream of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to identify and quantify target DNA enrichment across the entire genome. SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Dual Index Primers) contains adaptors and primers that are ideally suited for multiplex sample preparation for NG-seq on the Illumina® platform. This kit can be used to generate up to 96 distinct, barcoded ChIP-seq DNA libraries that can be combined into a single sequencing reaction. This product provides enough reagents to support up to 96 DNA sequencing libraries, and must be used in combination with SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq DNA Library Prep Kit for Illumina® #56795.This product is compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic ChIP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003, SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic ChIP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9005, and SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication ChIP kit #56383. This product is not compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9002 and SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9004 because agarose beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which will contaminate DNA library preps and NG-seq.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$184
24 assays
1 Kit
Next generation sequencing (NG-seq) is a high throughput method that can be used downstream of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to identify and quantify target DNA enrichment across the entire genome. SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq Multiplex Oligos for Illumina® (Single Index Primers) contains adaptors and primers that are ideally suited for multiplex sample preparation for NG-seq on the Illumina® platform. This kit can be used to generate up to 12 distinct, barcoded ChIP-seq DNA libraries that can be combined into a single sequencing reaction.This product provides enough reagents to support up to 24 DNA sequencing libraries, and must be used in combination with the SimpleChIP® ChIP-seq DNA Library Prep Kit for Illumina® #56795.This product is compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic ChIP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003, SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic ChIP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9005, and SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication ChIP kit #56383. This product is not compatible with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9002 and SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9004 because agarose beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which will contaminate DNA library preps and NG-seq.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$76
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
This product is offered to conveniently provide additional ChIP buffer reagents for preparing, immunoprecipitating, washing, and eluting chromatin using our SimpleChIP® (#9002, #9003) and SimpleChIP® Plus (#9004, #9005) Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits, as well as our SimpleChIP® Sonication Chromatin IP kit (#56383). These SimpleChIP® kits provide all the reagents required for performing the recommended of chromatin preparations (or optimizations) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, however there are instances where extra ChIP Buffer, ChIP Elution buffer, and NaCl are desired.
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$107
36 DNA Purifications
1 Kit
This product is offered to conveniently provide additional ChIP buffer reagents for preparing, immunoprecipitating, washing, and eluting chromatin using our SimpleChIP® (#9002, #9003) and SimpleChIP® Plus (#9004, #9005) Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits, as well as our SimpleChIP® Sonication Chromatin IP kit (#56383). These SimpleChIP® kits provide all the reagents required for performing the recommended of chromatin preparations (or optimizations) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, however there are instances where extra ChIP Buffer, ChIP Elution buffer, and NaCl are desired.The DNA purification columns combine the convenience of spin-column technology with the selective binding properties of a uniquely designed silica membrane that allows for efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. After DNA purification, the enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods.
$76
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
This product is offered to conveniently provide additional Buffer A and Buffer B reagents for harvesting cells and tissues and preparing chromatin using our SimpleChIP® (#9002, #9003) and SimpleChIP® Plus (#9004, #9005) Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits. These kits provide all the reagents required for performing 6 chromatin preparations (or optimizations) and 30 chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, however there are instances where extra Buffer A and Buffer B reagents are desired.
$490
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9002 contains the buffers and reagents necessary to perform up to 6 chromatin preparations and 30 chromatin immunoprecipitations and is optimized for 4 X 107 cells per experiment. A complete assay can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or fewer cells.Cells are fixed with formaldehyde and lysed, and chromatin is fragmented by partial digestion with Micrococcal Nuclease to obtain chromatin fragments of 1 to 5 nucleosomes. Enzymatic fragmentation of chromatin is much milder than sonication and eliminates problems resulting from variability in sonication power and emulsification of chromatin during sonication, which can result in incomplete fragmentation of chromatin or loss of antibody epitopes due to protein denaturation and degradation. Chromatin immunoprecipitations are performed using ChIP-validated antibodies and ChIP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads. After reversal of protein-DNA cross-links, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns, allowing for easy and efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences during immunoprecipitation can be analyzed by a variety of methods, including standard PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. Please note that this kit is not compatible with ChIP-seq because the ChIP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which interferes with downstream sequencing.The SimpleChIP® Kit also provides important controls to ensure a successful ChIP experiment. The kit contains a positive control Histone H3 Antibody, a negative control Normal Rabbit IgG Antibody and primer sets for PCR detection of the human and mouse ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30) genes. Histone H3 is a core component of chromatin and is bound to most DNA sequences throughout the genome, including the RPL30 locus. Thus, the Histone H3 Antibody provides a universal positive control that should enrich for almost any locus examined.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$504
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9003 contains the buffers and reagents necessary to perform up to 6 chromatin preparations and 30 chromatin immunoprecipitations and is optimized for 4 X 107 cells per experiment. A complete assay can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or fewer cells.Cells are fixed with formaldehyde and lysed, and chromatin is fragmented by partial digestion with Micrococcal Nuclease to obtain chromatin fragments of 1 to 5 nucleosomes. Enzymatic fragmentation of chromatin is much milder than sonication and eliminates problems resulting from variability in sonication power and emulsification of chromatin during sonication, which can result in incomplete fragmentation of chromatin or loss of antibody epitopes due to protein denaturation and degradation. Chromatin immunoprecipitations are performed using ChIP-validated antibodies and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After reversal of protein-DNA cross-links, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns, allowing for easy and efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences during immunoprecipitation can be analyzed by a variety of methods, including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or amplification for ChIP on chip, sequencing or cloning techniques. This kit is compatible with ChIP-seq.The SimpleChIP® Kit also provides important controls to ensure a successful ChIP experiment. The kit contains a positive control Histone H3 Antibody, a negative control Normal Rabbit IgG Antibody and primer sets for PCR detection of the human and mouse ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30) genes. Histone H3 is a core component of chromatin and is bound to most DNA sequences throughout the genome, including the RPL30 locus. Thus, the Histone H3 Antibody provides a universal positive control that should enrich for almost any locus examined.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$545
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Agarose Beads) #9004 contains the buffers and reagents necessary to perform up to 30 chromatin immunoprecipitations from cells or tissue samples, and is optimized for 4 X 106 cells or 25 mg of tissue per immunoprecipitation. A complete assay can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells or tissue sample.Cells or tissue are fixed with formaldehyde and lysed, and chromatin is fragmented by partial digestion with Micrococcal Nuclease to obtain chromatin fragments of 1 to 5 nucleosomes. Enzymatic fragmentation of chromatin is much milder than sonication and eliminates problems resulting from variability in sonication power and emulsification of chromatin during sonication, which can result in incomplete fragmentation of chromatin or loss of antibody epitopes due to protein denaturation and degradation. Chromatin immunoprecipitations are performed using ChIP-validated antibodies and ChIP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads. After reversal of protein-DNA cross-links, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns, allowing for easy and efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences during immunoprecipitation can be analyzed by a variety of methods, including standard PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. Please note that this kit is not compatible with ChIP-seq because the ChIP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads are blocked with sonicated salmon sperm DNA, which interferes with downstream sequencing.The SimpleChIP® Plus Kit also provides important controls to ensure a successful ChIP experiment. The kit contains a positive control Histone H3 Antibody, a negative control Normal Rabbit IgG Antibody and primer sets for PCR detection of the human and mouse ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30) genes. Histone H3 is a core component of chromatin and is bound to most DNA sequences throughout the genome, including the RPL30 locus. Thus, the Histone H3 Antibody provides a universal positive control that should enrich for almost any locus examined.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$561
30 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleChIP® Plus Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kit (Magnetic Beads) #9005 contains the buffers and reagents necessary to perform up to 30 chromatin immunoprecipitations from cells or tissue samples, and is optimized for 4 X 106 cells or 25 mg of tissue per immunoprecipitation. A complete assay can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells or tissue sample. This kit is compatable with ChIP-seq.Cells or tissue are fixed with formaldehyde and lysed, and chromatin is fragmented by partial digestion with Micrococcal Nuclease to obtain chromatin fragments of 1 to 5 nucleosomes. Enzymatic fragmentation of chromatin is much milder than sonication and eliminates problems resulting from variability in sonication power and emulsification of chromatin during sonication, which can result in incomplete fragmentation of chromatin or loss of antibody epitopes due to protein denaturation and degradation. Chromatin immunoprecipitations are performed using ChIP-validated antibodies and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After reversal of protein-DNA cross-links, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns, allowing for easy and efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences during immunoprecipitation can be analyzed by a variety of methods, including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or amplification for ChIP on chip, sequencing or cloning techniques. This kit is compatible with ChIP-seq.The SimpleChIP® Plus Kit also provides important controls to ensure a successful ChIP experiment. The kit contains a positive control Histone H3 Antibody, a negative control Normal Rabbit IgG Antibody and primer sets for PCR detection of the human and mouse ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30) genes. Histone H3 is a core component of chromatin and is bound to most DNA sequences throughout the genome, including the RPL30 locus. Thus, the Histone H3 Antibody provides a universal positive control that should enrich for almost any locus examined.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$478
24 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication Chromatin IP Kit contains the buffers and reagents necessary to perform up to 24 chromatin immunoprecipitations from cells or tissue samples, and is optimized for 4 X 106 cells or 25 mg of tissue per immunoprecipitation. A complete assay can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells or tissue sample. This kit is compatible with both ChIP-qPCR and ChIP-seq.Cells or tissue are fixed with formaldehyde and lysed, and chromatin is fragmented by sonication to obtain chromatin fragments ranging from 200 to 1000 bp. Sonication-based fragmentation is the more traditional method for fragmenting chromatin; however, sonication should be optimized such that the desired fragment size is achieved with the minimal amount of sonication required, as over-sonication can result in a decrease in immunoprecipitation, specifically for transcription factors and cofactors. The cell and nuclear lysis buffers for this kit have been optimized to maximize enrichment of histones, transcription factors and cofactors. Chromatin immunoprecipitations are performed using ChIP-validated antibodies and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After reversal of protein-DNA cross-links, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns, allowing for easy and efficient recovery of DNA and removal of protein contaminants without the need for phenol/chloroform extractions and ethanol precipitations. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences during immunoprecipitation can be analyzed by a variety of methods, including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or amplification for ChIP on chip, sequencing or cloning techniques.The SimpleChIP® Plus Kit also provides important controls to ensure a successful ChIP experiment. The kit contains a positive control Histone H3 Antibody, a negative control Normal Rabbit IgG Antibody, and primer sets for PCR detection of the human and mouse ribosomal protein L30 (RPL30) genes. Histone H3 is a core component of chromatin and is bound to most DNA sequences throughout the genome, including the RPL30 locus. Thus, the Histone H3 Antibody provides a universal positive control that should enrich for almost any locus examined.

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome, or the opposite, to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). It can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells or tissues are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. The chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing, or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8).

$61
24 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
This product is offered to conveniently provide additional Sonication Cell Lysis and Nuclear Lysis Buffers for harvesting cells and tissues and preparing chromatin using our SimpleChIP® Plus Sonication Chromatin IP Kit (#56383). This kit provides all the reagents required for performing up to 20 chromatin preparations (or optimizations) and up to 24 chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, however there are instances where extra cell and nuclear lysis buffers are required.
The Class I HDAC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting Class I HDAC proteins using control antibodies against HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

The Class II HDAC Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting Class II HDAC proteins using control antibodies against HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, and HDAC7. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

This peptide is used to block Di-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys4) (C64G9) Rabbit mAb #9725 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Di-Methyl-Histone H3 Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating methylation sites on histone H3. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The DNA Cytosine Modification Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the levels of cytosine modifications in DNA by dot blot using antibodies against 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine.

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and mammalian development (1,2). 5-methylcytosine is a repressive epigenetic mark established de novo by two enzymes, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, and is maintained by DNMT1 (3, 4). 5-methylcytosine was originally thought to be passively depleted during DNA replication. However, subsequent studies have shown that Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins TET1, TET2, and TET3 can catalyze the oxidation of methylated cytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (5). Additionally, TET proteins can further oxidize 5-hmC to form 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC), both of which are excised by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), effectively linking cytosine oxidation to the base excision repair pathway and supporting active cytosine demethylation (6,7).

$499
96 assays
1 Kit
The FastScan™ Phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10) ELISA Kit is a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of histone H3 when phosphorylated at Ser10. To perform the assay, sample is incubated with a capture antibody conjugated with a proprietary tag and a second detection antibody linked to HRP, forming a sandwich with phospho-histone H3 (Ser10) in solution. This entire complex is immobilized to the plate via an anti-tag antibody. The wells are then washed to remove unbound material. TMB is then added. The magnitude of observed signal is proportional to the quantity of phospho-histone H3 (Ser10). Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

The Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate the endogenous levels of HDACs. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

This peptide is used to block HP1α Antibody #2616 and HP1α (C7F11) Rabbit mAb #2623 reactivity in dot blot protocols.

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

The Jumonji Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total levels of Jumonji family proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.
The Lysine Acetyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several lysine acetyltrasferases, including: Acetyl-CBP, CBP, GCN5L2, and PCAF. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Lysine Methyltransferase Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means to evaluate endogenous levels of lysine methyltransferases. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
$380
10 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit provides enough reagents to perform up to 10 genomic DNA preparations and 10 IPs from mammalian cells and is optimized for 1 μg of genomic DNA per IP. The SimpleDIP™ protocol can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells. Cells are first lysed and genomic DNA is extracted and sonicated into small fragments (200-500 bp). DNA IPs are performed using 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (HMC31) Mouse mAb and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After elution from the beads, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns provided in the kit. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or next-generation sequencing. The SimpleDIP™ 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine DNA IP Kit provides a highly validated 5-hmC monoclonal antibody to ensure specific and robust signal. The kit also includes DNA that contains exclusively 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, which can be spiked-in to the IPs as a control. Thus, spiked-in DNA will be immunoprecipitated with 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC1) Mouse mAb, but not with the Mouse (G3A1) mAb IgG1 Isotype Control (DIP Formulated). The relative enrichment can then be quantified using the SimpleDIP Hydroxymethyl Control Primers.

Background: DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) is a technique that uses antibodies to immunoenrich for regions of the genome containing modified nucleotides. This assay was first used with a 5-methylcytosine antibody to identify differentially methylated sites within normal and transformed cells (1). Investigators can use the DIP assay to look at specific genomic loci or look across the entire genome by utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS) (2). When performing the DIP assay, cells are first lysed and the nucleic acids are recovered using phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA is then removed by RNase A digestion, and genomic DNA is isolated by a second round of phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The resulting genomic DNA is then fragmented by either restriction enzyme digestion or sonication and subjected to immunoprecipitation (IP) using antibodies specific to the modified nucleotide. Any sequences containing the modified nucleotide will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After IP, the DNA is purified and Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence. Alternatively, the DIP assay can be combined with NGS to provide genome-wide analysis of a specific DNA modification.