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Product listing: ZO-3 (D57G7) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O95049 #3704 to COL1A1 Antibody, UniProt ID P02452 #84336

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$348
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. α-Parvin (D7F9) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of α-Parvin. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Parvin (D7F9) XP® Rabbit mAb #8190.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through heterodimeric integral membrane proteins called integrins. Integrins connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton, and therefore the cell signaling machinery, through protein complexes called focal adhesions (1).The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) complex is composed of three highly conserved proteins recruited to sites of ECM contact as pre-assembled structures. The IPP acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. All three proteins contain multiple protein binding domains allowing them to function as adaptor proteins in the formation of focal adhesions. ILK (integrin-linked kinase) also has a catalytic (protein Ser/Thr kinase) domain, and may or may not function as a kinase in vivo. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).The parvin family consists of 3 members, α-parvin/actopaxin, β-parvin/affixin, and γ-parvin. α-parvin and β-parvin are expressed ubiquitously, while expression of γ-parvin is restricted to hematopoietic cells (4). α-parvin binds to f-actin both directly and via interaction with the focal adhesion protein paxillin (5). α-parvin regulates cell spreading and motility through interactions with the cofilin kinase TESK1 (6), and with the GTPase activating protein CdGAP (7). Phosphorylation of α-parvin during mitosis may have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics during the cell cycle (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure of secreted macromolecules surrounding mammalian organs and tissues. Controlled interactions between cells and the ECM are important in proliferation, migration, survival, polarity, and differentiation. Cells contact the ECM primarily through heterodimeric integral membrane proteins called integrins. Integrins connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton, and therefore the cell signaling machinery, through protein complexes called focal adhesions (1).The ILK/PINCH/Parvin (IPP) complex is composed of three highly conserved proteins recruited to sites of ECM contact as pre-assembled structures. The IPP acts at the interface of the integrin/actin connection to regulate formation of focal adhesions and integrin signaling. All three proteins contain multiple protein binding domains allowing them to function as adaptor proteins in the formation of focal adhesions. ILK (integrin-linked kinase) also has a catalytic (protein Ser/Thr kinase) domain, and may or may not function as a kinase in vivo. Roles for IPP proteins outside of the IPP complex have been proposed, including regulation of gene expression (2,3).The parvin family consists of 3 members, α-parvin/actopaxin, β-parvin/affixin, and γ-parvin. α-parvin and β-parvin are expressed ubiquitously, while expression of γ-parvin is restricted to hematopoietic cells (4). α-parvin binds to f-actin both directly and via interaction with the focal adhesion protein paxillin (5). α-parvin regulates cell spreading and motility through interactions with the cofilin kinase TESK1 (6), and with the GTPase activating protein CdGAP (7). Phosphorylation of α-parvin during mitosis may have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics during the cell cycle (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: βIG-H3 (TGFBI/RGD-CAP/Kerato-epithelin) is a 683-amino acid secretory protein induced by TGF-β that plays a role in cell adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis (1-4). βIG-H3 contains an internal cysteine-rich EMI domain followed by four fasciclin-1 domains and a carboxy terminal RGD domain (1,2). It contributes to cell adhesion through interactions with integrins as well as a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin (5-7). ECM βIG-H3 is found in a wide variety of tissues (8-12). Mutations in the βIG-H3 gene as well as elevated protein levels are most notably associated with corneal dystrophies (13).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Also known as plakoglobin, γ-catenin is a member of the Armadillo family of signaling molecules, which includes β-catenin and the Drosophila protein armadillo (1). This family of proteins is involved in Wnt signaling, which is important in embryonic development and in tumorigenesis (2-3). Although the two vertebrate proteins β- and γ-catenin display sequence homology, γ-catenin likely plays a role distinct from that of β-catenin (1, 4-6). γ-catenin localizes to desmosomes and adherens junctions, both sites of intercellular adhesion, and interacts with the cytoplasmic domains of classical and desmosomal cadherins. Interaction of γ- or β-catenin with α-catenin, desmoplakin and other junction proteins provides a link between intercellular junctions and the actin and intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Maintenance and/or modification of this link is vital for control of cell adhesion and migration (1). γ-catenin is modified by phosphorylation, affecting both adhesion and β-catenin dependent transcription (7), and by and O-glycosylation, affecting adhesion (8). Recent evidence suggests that γ-catenin regulates desmosomal adhesion in response to growth factor stimulation (9).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total EpCAM Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of EpCAM protein. An EpCAM rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, the EpCAM proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, an EpCAM mouse detection mAb is added to detect captured EpCAM proteins. Anti-mouse, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of EpCAM protein.Antibodies in the kit are custom formulations specific to the kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total MUC1 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of MUC1 protein. A MUC1 mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, the MUC1 proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a MUC1 rabbit detection mAb is added to detect captured MUC proteins. Anti-rabbit, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of MUC1 protein.Antibodies in the kit are custom formulations specific to the kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Mucins represent a family of glycoproteins characterized by repeat domains and dense O-glycosylation (1). MUC1 (or mucin 1) is aberrantly overexpressed in most human carcinomas. Increased expression of MUC1 in carcinomas reduces cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. MUC1 is cleaved proteolytically, and the large ectodomain can remain associated with the small 25 kDa carboxy-terminal domain that contains a transmembrane segment and a 72-residue cytoplasmic tail (1). MUC1 interacts with ErbB family receptors and potentiates ERK1/2 activation (2). MUC1 also interacts with β-catenin, which is regulated by GSK-3β, PKCγ, and Src through phosphorylation at Ser44, Thr41, and Tyr46 of the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail (3-5). Overexpression of MUC1 potentiates transformation (6) and attenuates stress-induced apoptosis through the Akt or p53 pathways (7,8).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Total PSA/KLK3 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of PSA/KLK3. A PSA/KLK3 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, PSA/KLK3 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a PSA/KLK3 Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured PSA/KLK3 protein. A HRP-linked, anti-mouse antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total PSA/KLK3.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and a metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influence cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins, such as cytokines and growth factors. This process influences cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion and ECM remodeling. Conserved domains found in most ADAM family proteins include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a carboxy-terminal cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The ADAM metallopeptidase domain 10 (ADAM10) is a plasma membrane proteinase that cleaves membrane-bound proteins targeted for regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). The ADAM10 prodomain acts as a chaperone that stabilizes mature ADAM protein folding, and prevents target-protein shedding through inhibition of ADAM10 proteinase activity (3,4). Mature ADAM10 is the major α-secretase responsible for cleavage of Notch, APP, cadherins, and prion protein (5-7). The ADAM10 protein cleaves receptor tyrosine kinases and their associated ligands and displays a wide range of regulatory functions across related signaling pathways (8). Research studies using knockout mice demonstrate that loss of ADAM10 results in defects in cortex formation, lymphocyte development, and cardiovascular development (9-11). Increased ADAM10 protein expression correlates with progression of many types of cancer (i.e. gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and brain glioma), due to increased cancer cell migration, metastasis, and invasion (12-14). Mutations in the corresponding ADAM10 gene result in a rare, autosomal dominant pigmentation disorder known as reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ADAM (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influences cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins such as cytokines and growth factors, by influencing cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by directly remodeling the ECM. Conserved domains in ADAM family members include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The prodomain is thought to aid in protein folding. Disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains mediate adhesion, at least in part, through binding to integrins. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail as well as its interaction with other signaling proteins may influence intra- and extracellular signaling (1). ADAM9 is widely distributed and has been shown to affect migration in skin keratinocytes (3,4). Research studies have shown that ADAM9 is overexpressed in prostate cancer (5), pancreatic cancer (6), gastric cancer (7), and has been linked to invasion and metastasis in small cell lung cancer (8). Research has also shown that an alternatively spliced short (50 kDa) form of ADAM9 containing protease activity is involved in tumor cell invasion (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ajuba belongs to the Zyxin/Ajuba family, members of which include LIMD1, LPP, Trip6 and Zyxin. Three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus characterize this family of proteins. Zyxin/Ajuba family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton, are components of both cell-cell junction adhesive complex and integrin-mediated adhesive complex, and shuttle in and out of the nucleus (1). Ajuba is involved in Rac activation during cell migration and activates Aurora A in order to commit to mitosis (2-3). Ajuba and its family members also have an amino-terminal proline-rich pre-LIM region, and Ajuba augments ERK activation in a Ras-dependent manner (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Angiotensinogen (AGT) is the primary precursor of angiotensins, peptide hormones that play a central role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (1-3). AGT is a secreted protein synthesized primarily by the liver and secreted into circulation. Upon binding to renin, the amino terminal fragment of AGT is cleaved and released as a decapeptide hormone termed angiotensin 1 (Ang I). Ang I is subsequently processed by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate angiotensin II (Ang II), which acts on AT1 and AT2 receptors in the central nervous system to increase production of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), while promoting vasoconstriction in the peripheral circulation (4). Aberrant upregulation of Ang II has been associated with numerous clinical conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, myocardial hypertrophy, and obesity (5-7). Alternative cleavage products of Ang I (e.g., Ang 1-7) can also be generated by ACE2 cleavage, some of which display biological functions that are distinct from Ang II (8). Treatments that target the RAS (e.g., ACE inhibitors) are consequently of significant importance in the treatment of hypertensive and hypertensive-related disorders(5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bone sialoprotein II (BSP II) exists as a secreted protein in extracellular matrix of the skeleton (1-2). BSP II is part of the small integrin binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family and its role is crucial for cell to matrix adhesion as well as between two active protein complexes (3). Flexible binding capacity of BSP II also allows it to rapidly associate with various proteins, calcium, and mineralized phases of developing bone (3-5). BSP II plays a central role in the initiation of hydroxyapatite microcalcification of breast cancer cells that contributes to the pathogenesis of bone metastasis (4,6,7). Recent evidence suggests that the downregulation of BSP II may lead to the reduced formation of metastatic lesions and bone metastasis in a human breast cancer model (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Catenin δ-1 (p120 catenin) has an amino-terminal coiled-coil domain followed by a regulatory domain containing multiple phosphorylation sites and a central Armadillo repeat domain of ten linked 42-amino acid repeats. The carboxy-terminal tail has no known function (1). Catenin δ-1 fulfills critical roles in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion as it regulates E-cadherin turnover at the cell surface to determine the level of E-cadherin available for cell-cell adhesion (2). Catenin δ-1 has both positive and negative effects on cadherin-mediated adhesion (3). Actin dynamics are also regulated by catenin δ-1, which modulates RhoA, Rac, and cdc42 proteins (1). Analogous to β-catenin, catenin δ-1 translocates to the nucleus, although its role at this location is unclear. Many studies show that catenin δ-1 is expressed irregularly or is absent in various types of tumor cells, suggesting that catenin δ-1 may function as a tumor suppressor (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin D is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal aspartyl protease involved in the normal degradation of proteins (1). It is synthesized as an inactive 43 kDa preprocathepsin D that is cleaved and glycosylated to form a 46 kDa procathepsin D and then further cleaved to produce 28 kDa and 15 kDa subunits (heavy and light chains, respectively) (2). Cathepsin D may also be secreted into the cytosol during apoptosis and contribute to cleavage of substrates implicated in the apoptotic pathway (3). Numerous studies have suggested that cathepsin D plays a role in neuronal degradation and malignant transformation, particularily in breast cancer (4-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCN3, also named NOV (Nephroblastoma overexressed), belongs to the CCN (Cyr61, Ctgf, NOV) family of proteins. It is a cystine-rich secretory protein that associates with components of the extracellular matrix. Like other CCN family members, CCN3 is capable of mediating diverse biological functions through its four distinct domains, which enable binding to numerous protein partners (1-5).CCN3 modulates bone turnover through various mechanisms and is implicated in the progression of primary bone cancers such as osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma (6-8). Research has shown that CCN3 is also involved in the bone metastasis of melanoma, breast cancer, and prostate cancers (9-11). Recently, CCN3 was reported to play an important role in stem cell renewal (12). CCN3 is normally expressed in both embryonic and adult tissues (13,14). The activity of CCN3 is influenced by post translational modifications and proteolytic cleavage (15,16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CD151 (PETA-3, SFA-1) is a member of the evolutionarily conserved tetraspanin family of multipass glycoproteins (TM4SF), highlighted by four transmembrane domains, two extracellular loops, and N/C-termini that reside within the cytoplasm. Identified as the first member of the tetraspanin family to be implicated in tumorigenesis, research studies have demonstrated that CD151 participates in tumor neovascularization (1), tumor cell cell invasion (2), and cell adhesion (3). Furthermore, a positive correlation exists between CD151 expression levels and poor prognosis for tumors of the lung (4), kidney (5), and prostate (6). CD151 is localized predominantly to the plasma membrane and research studies have demonstrated that CD151 exerts its pro-tumorigenic effects, in part, through the modulation of laminin-binding integrins (7-9) and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Met (10,11) and EGFR (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CD248, also known as Endosialin and TEM1, is a stromal cell marker expressed on activated mesenchymal cells including fibroblasts and pericytes. Not normally detectable in most adult tissues, it is highly expressed in lymphoid tissues during development, and in disease states where increased stromal cell proliferation and migration are evident (1-3). CD248 is known to be upregulated in breast cancer, brain tumors (4-6), and other malignancies including sarcoma (12), and it has been implicated in sprouting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis (7). It is thought that the CD248 gene is upregulated in response to hypoxic conditions in the tumor environment through HIF2 activation (8). Interestingly, CD248 is found to be highly expressed in activated fibroblasts. In liver fibrosis for example, CD248 marks the Hepatic Stellate Cells, the activated cells responsible for matrix production (9,10). In kidney fibrosis, CD248 marks the key effector cells within the fibrotic stroma including pericytes, myofibroblasts, and stromal fibroblasts (11), and in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, CD248 may be a marker for severity of disease (12). CD248 has become a target of interest for pharmaceutical intervention in a wide scope of diseases (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD54 or ICAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) of adhesion molecules. CD54 is expressed at low levels in diverse cell types, and is induced by cytokines (TNF-α, interleukin-1) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (1). Apical localization of CD54 on endothelial cells (or basolateral localization on epithelial cells) is a prerequisite for leukocyte trafficking through the endothelial (or epithelial) barrier (1). Apical expression of CD54 on epithelial cells mediates pathogen invasion as well as host defense, a pattern also observed in tumors (1). CD54 also functions as a co-stimulator on antigen presenting cells, binding to its receptor LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen-1) on the surface of T cells during antigen presentation (2). Cross-linking of CD54 or binding to its ligand triggers activation of Src family kinases and the Rho/ROCK pathway (3-7). Phosphorylation on Tyr485 of CD54 is required for its association with SHP-2 (5). SHP-2 seems essential for CD54-induced Src activation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CUB domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1, SIMA135) is a putative stem cell marker shown in research studies to be highly expressed in some human cancer cells and in both typical and atypical (cancerous) colons (1). Expression of CDCP1 may be epigenetically regulated, as methylation of promoter CpG sequences results in decreased CDCP1 expression (2). The corresponding CDCP1 gene encodes a glycoprotein that acts as a complex, multidomain transmembrane antigen. CDCP1 has three extracellular CUB domains that may be involved in cell adhesion or extracellular matrix interactions (1,3). Src-family kinases may phosphorylate CDCP1 at five tyrosine residues within its cytoplasmic domain to provide a potential binding site for SH2 domain-containing proteins (3). CDCP1 is a putative hematopoietic stem cell marker (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Extracellular Matrix (ECM) is a complex network of macromolecules that provides structural tissue support to cells in the basement membrane and interstitial matrix. It is composed of many molecules including proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and polysaccharides (1,2). One of the major proteins that comprises the ECM, and the human body, is collagen. Collagens are a large family of proteins. They are trimeric molecules comprised of three alpha polypeptide chains that form a triple helix structure that is characteristic of all collagens (3). The large family of collagens is divided into three sub groups: the fibrillar collagens, the non-fibril forming collagens, and the fibril-associated collagens. These sub groups differ in their structure and supramolecular assembly (3).Collagen11A1 (COL11A1) is a minor fibrillar collagen that is not normally expressed at high levels in most normal tissues with the exception of cartilage where it is expressed in high levels, and some other tissues/ organs, where it is expressed at a lower level (4). However, it has been reported that the expression of this molecule is correlated with advanced tumorigenic disease through meta analysis of data from multiple cancers, including ovarian, colon, breast, and lung (5). Additionally, it has also been associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis (6,7). Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are typically the most abundant cell type in the stroma of many solid tumors. They are thought to contribute to ECM stiffness, which is ultimately thought to contribute to tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapeutic intervention. COL11A1 has been found to be elevated in CAFs and may contribute to chemotherapy resistance (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).