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Product listing: HMGA1 (D6A4) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P17096 #7777 to LSD1 (C69G12) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O60341 #2184

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HMGA1, formerly known as HMG-I/Y, belongs to a family of high mobility group proteins that contain an AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA1 is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in embryonic stem cells, but not in fully differentiated adult tissues (2-4). Research studies have shown that HMGA1 is over-expressed in rapidly dividing neoplastic cells and a wide variety of aggressive cancers, including thyroid, colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate (2-4). Investigators have shown that forced expression of HMGA1 induces cellular transformation and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), while inhibition of HMGA1 expression blocks anchorage-independent cell growth and proliferation of cancer cells, suggesting that HMGA1 contributes to carcinogenesis by inducing and maintaining a de-differentiated, highly proliferative cell state (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HMGA2 belongs to the family of high mobility group with AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA2 is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed and plays a crucial role during embryonic development (3). HMGA2 promotes stem cell self-renewal and research studies have shown that decreased HMGA2 expression is associated with stem cell aging (4-7). Investigators have shown that expression levels of HMGA2 are very low in normal adult tissues, while either overexpression or rearrangement is associated with many types of cancer (8-11).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HMGB1 (D3E5) Rabbit mAb #6893.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B2 (HMGB2) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but it is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 and HMGB2 facilitate the binding of Hox proteins, Oct proteins, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). Furthermore, HMGB2 interacts with RAG1 to facilitate RAG complex binding to the recombinant signal sequence (RSS) and stimulate DNA-bending and subsequent VDJ cleavage at antigen receptor genes (5,6). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation. HMGB2 is secreted by myeloid cells and promotes proliferation and migration of endothelial cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) (7). Research studies have shown that HMGB2 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival time (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$270
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) is a member of the hnRNP A/B family of related RNA binding proteins that bind pre-mRNA and are involved in the processing, metabolism and transport of nuclear pre-mRNA transcripts (1). Alternative splicing produces transcripts that encode two homologous hnRNP proteins, hnRNPA2 and hnRNPB1, from a single gene sequence (2). Studies demonstrate hnRNP A2/B1 splicing repression across multiple targets (3,4) and that both proteins can bind and protect telomere repeat sequences from DNase digestion (5,6). Altered expression of hnRNP B1 is seen in several forms of cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and various forms of lung cancer (7). Over expression of hnRNP B1 may be associated with inhibition of DNA-PK activity and impaired DNA repair during early stages of cancer development (8). Autoantigens to hnRNP A2/B1 (termed RA33) are associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythromatosus and mixed connective tissue disease (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HOXB13 is a member of the HOXB cluster which, along with the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters, governs embryonic patterning along the cranio-caudal axis (1,2). HOXB13 plays a key role in the development of the ventral prostate, where it is expressed highly from the embryonic stage through adulthood (3,4). Research studies have shown that both overexpression and RNA interference can inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. HOXB13 can function as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating growth through repression of TCF4 and androgen receptor (AR) signaling (4,5). However, HOXB13 has also been shown to be overexpressed in more invasive prostate cancers, breast and ovarian cancers, and hepatocellular carcinomas (6-9). A common germline mutation G84E in the HOXB13 protein has recently been found to be associated with significant increased risk of prostate cancer (10). Currently, HOXB13 is being evaluated as a marker for metastatic lesions of prostate origin (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) belong to a family of zipcode-binding proteins (1,2). Three members of this family, IMP1, IMP2, and IMP3, have been identified (1,2). They contain two RNA recognition motifs, four K homology domains, and were found to function in mRNA localization, turnover, and translation control (1,2). Research studies have implicated these proteins in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as growth and development (3), testicular neoplasia (4), and melanocytic neoplasia (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1) is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of tumor suppressor proteins and transcription regulators (1,2). Differential mRNA splicing generates several ING1 isoforms, with the widely expressed ING1b (p33) isoform playing key roles in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and senescence (2-5). All ING family proteins contain a plant homeodomain (PHD) that is thought to recognize and bind methylated lysine residues on histone proteins (6,7). The ING1 protein regulates expression of genes through its association with histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes. The PHD of ING1 may facilitate the recruitment of these chromatin-modifying enzymes to targets genes that are regulated by various transcription factors, such as p53 (2, 8-10). Consistent with its role as a tumor suppressor, alterations in ING1 expression levels and cytoplasm localization have been observed in several cancers but mutations in the corresponding ING1 gene in cancers are uncommon (11-14).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Jumonji/ARID domain-containing protein 2 (JARID2) is a founding member of the JmjC-domain-containing protein family that is involved in regulation of histone methyltransferase activity (1,2). While many proteins in this family are protein demethylases, JARID2 lacks several conserved residues in the catalytic domain and does not exhibit protein demethylase activity (1,2). Research studies indicate that JARID2 is a nuclear protein that is highly expressed in poorly differentiated and actively dividing cells, with expression decreasing upon cellular differentiation (3,4). Expression of JARID2 protein is essential for embryonic development as the protein plays an important role in regulation of heart and liver development, neural tube fusion, and hematopoiesis (4). JARID2 is an accessory component of the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2), which represses target gene expression through methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 by EZH2 methyltransferase (5-10). JARID2 recruits the PRC2 complex to target genes and increases EZH2 methyltransferase activity by binding to nucleosomes and DNA (5-10). Additional studies show that loss of JARID2 expression results in decreased recruitment of PRC2, decreased methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 at target genes, and delayed and incomplete differentiation of embryonic stem cells (5-10). Experimental knockdown of JARID2 in Xenopus laevis impairs the induction of gastrulation genes in blastula embryos and results in differentiation failure (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain of several proteins has been shown to catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into seven separate families (3). The JMJD1 (Jumonji domain-containing protein 1) family, also known as JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 2) family, contains four members: hairless (HR), JMJD1A/JHDM2A, JMJD1B/JHDM2B, and JMJD1C/JHDM2C. Hairless is expressed in the skin and brain and acts as a co-repressor of the thyroid hormone receptor (4-6). Mutations in the hairless gene cause alopecia in both mice and humans (4,5). JMJD1A is expressed in meiotic and post-meiotic male germ cells, contributes to androgen receptor-mediated gene regulation, and is required for spermatogenesis (7-9). It has also been identified as a downstream target of OCT4 and STAT3 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (10,11). JMJD1B is a more widely expressed family member and is frequently deleted in myeloid leukemia (12). JMJD1C (also known as TRIP8) is a co-factor of both the androgen and thyroid receptors and has a potential link to autism (13-15). Members of the JMJD1/JHDM2 family have been shown to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 (Lys9) (3,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain of several proteins has been shown to catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into seven separate families (3). The JMJD1 (Jumonji domain-containing protein 1) family, also known as JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 2) family, contains four members: hairless (HR), JMJD1A/JHDM2A, JMJD1B/JHDM2B, and JMJD1C/JHDM2C. Hairless is expressed in the skin and brain and acts as a co-repressor of the thyroid hormone receptor (4-6). Mutations in the hairless gene cause alopecia in both mice and humans (4,5). JMJD1A is expressed in meiotic and post-meiotic male germ cells, contributes to androgen receptor-mediated gene regulation, and is required for spermatogenesis (7-9). It has also been identified as a downstream target of OCT4 and STAT3 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (10,11). JMJD1B is a more widely expressed family member and is frequently deleted in myeloid leukemia (12). JMJD1C (also known as TRIP8) is a co-factor of both the androgen and thyroid receptors and has a potential link to autism (13-15). Members of the JMJD1/JHDM2 family have been shown to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 (Lys9) (3,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain of several proteins has been shown to catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into seven separate families (3). The JMJD1 (Jumonji domain-containing protein 1) family, also known as JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 2) family, contains four members: hairless (HR), JMJD1A/JHDM2A, JMJD1B/JHDM2B, and JMJD1C/JHDM2C. Hairless is expressed in the skin and brain and acts as a co-repressor of the thyroid hormone receptor (4-6). Mutations in the hairless gene cause alopecia in both mice and humans (4,5). JMJD1A is expressed in meiotic and post-meiotic male germ cells, contributes to androgen receptor-mediated gene regulation, and is required for spermatogenesis (7-9). It has also been identified as a downstream target of OCT4 and STAT3 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (10,11). JMJD1B is a more widely expressed family member and is frequently deleted in myeloid leukemia (12). JMJD1C (also known as TRIP8) is a co-factor of both the androgen and thyroid receptors and has a potential link to autism (13-15). Members of the JMJD1/JHDM2 family have been shown to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 (Lys9) (3,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The jumonji domain-containing protein 2 (JMJD2) family, also known as the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 3 (JHDM3) family, contains four members: JMJD2A/JHDM3A, JMJD2B/JHDM3B, JMJD2C/JHDM3C, and JMJD2D/JHDM3D. In addition to the JmjC domain, these proteins also contain JmjN, PHD, and tudor domains, the latter of which has been shown to bind to methylated histone H3 at Lys4 and Lys9, and methylated histone H4 at Lys20 (4,5). JMJD2 proteins have been shown to demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and Lys36 and function as both activators and repressors of transcription (6-11). JMJD2A, JMJD2C, and JMJD2D function as coactivators of the androgen receptor in prostate tumor cells (7). In contrast, JMJD2A also associates with Rb and NCoR corepressor complexes and is necessary for transcriptional repression of target genes (8,9). JMJD2B antagonizes histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation at pericentric heterochromatin (10). JMJD2C, also known as GASC1, is amplified in squamous cell carcinomas and metastatic lung carcinoma and inhibition of JMJD2C expression decreases cell proliferation (11,12). JMJD2C has also been identified as a downstream target of Oct-4 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The jumonji domain-containing protein 2 (JMJD2) family, also known as the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 3 (JHDM3) family, contains four members: JMJD2A/JHDM3A, JMJD2B/JHDM3B, JMJD2C/JHDM3C, and JMJD2D/JHDM3D. In addition to the JmjC domain, these proteins also contain JmjN, PHD, and tudor domains, the latter of which has been shown to bind to methylated histone H3 at Lys4 and Lys9, and methylated histone H4 at Lys20 (4,5). JMJD2 proteins have been shown to demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and Lys36 and function as both activators and repressors of transcription (6-11). JMJD2A, JMJD2C, and JMJD2D function as coactivators of the androgen receptor in prostate tumor cells (7). In contrast, JMJD2A also associates with Rb and NCoR corepressor complexes and is necessary for transcriptional repression of target genes (8,9). JMJD2B antagonizes histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation at pericentric heterochromatin (10). JMJD2C, also known as GASC1, is amplified in squamous cell carcinomas and metastatic lung carcinoma and inhibition of JMJD2C expression decreases cell proliferation (11,12). JMJD2C has also been identified as a downstream target of Oct-4 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The jumonji domain-containing protein 2 (JMJD2) family, also known as the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 3 (JHDM3) family, contains four members: JMJD2A/JHDM3A, JMJD2B/JHDM3B, JMJD2C/JHDM3C, and JMJD2D/JHDM3D. In addition to the JmjC domain, these proteins also contain JmjN, PHD, and tudor domains, the latter of which has been shown to bind to methylated histone H3 at Lys4 and Lys9, and methylated histone H4 at Lys20 (4,5). JMJD2 proteins have been shown to demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and Lys36 and function as both activators and repressors of transcription (6-11). JMJD2A, JMJD2C, and JMJD2D function as coactivators of the androgen receptor in prostate tumor cells (7). In contrast, JMJD2A also associates with Rb and NCoR corepressor complexes and is necessary for transcriptional repression of target genes (8,9). JMJD2B antagonizes histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation at pericentric heterochromatin (10). JMJD2C, also known as GASC1, is amplified in squamous cell carcinomas and metastatic lung carcinoma and inhibition of JMJD2C expression decreases cell proliferation (11,12). JMJD2C has also been identified as a downstream target of Oct-4 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) is a bifunctional metalloenzyme belonging to the large family of JmjC domain-containing proteins. These proteins are ferrous iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes (Fe2+/2OG) that catalyze hydroxylation and demethylation reactions on a wide variety of protein and nucleic acid substrates (1). JMJD6 is thought to act as both a lysyl-hydroxylase and an arginine demethylase, although the latter activity remains controversial. Specifically, JMJD6 has been shown to catalyze 5-hydroxylation of Lys15 and Lys276 residues on the protein U2AF2 / U2AF65 in vivo, affecting pre-mRNA splicing activity (2). It has also been reported that JMJD6 hydroxylates the Lys382 residue of p53, preventing acetylation and promoting association of p53 with MDMX, resulting in inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity (3). In addition to hydroxylase activity, JMJD6 also acts as an arginine demethylase by targeting histone H3 at Arg2 (H3R2me) and histone H4 at Arg3 (H4R3me). Unlike other members of the JmjC family, JMJD6 appears to have no lysine demethylase activity (4). Studies have shown that JMJD6 colocalizes with BRD4 at a subset of enhancers to demethylate H3R2me2 repressor marks (5). It has also been reported to demethylate non-histone substrates, such as estrogen receptor (ERα) (6), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) (7), RNA helicase A (8), and the TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase following activation of toll-like receptors (9).Although mutations in the sequence of JMJD6 have not been observed in cancer, its overexpression is identified in various cancers and is associated with aggressive disease progression and poor prognosis (10). This holds true for certain types of colon (3), lung (11), and breast cancers (12, 13). Based on these findings, JMJD6 has drawn interest as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker for certain cancer types.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The LEDGF (lens epithelium-derived growth factor) gene encodes splice variants P75 and P52 (1). LEDGF (C57G11) Rabbit mAb detects the 75 kDA LEDGF splice form. Both LEDGF variants have transcriptional coactivator functions that may regulate gene transcription and mRNA splicing of a variety of proteins that are essential for cell growth and survival. (2,3). LEDGF has also been identified as a factor that can, in serum free media, stimulate the growth and survival of lens epithelial cells and other cell types such as retinal photoreceptor cells, COS7 cells, skin fibroblasts, and keratinocytes (2). In addition to its function as a transcriptional coactivator, LEDGF has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (4) and in the activity of HIV1 integrase. LEDGF binds chromatin throughout the cell cycle, and may act as a chromatin docking factor for HIV integrase and other lentiviral pre-integration complexes. It protects HIV integrase from degradation, and influences the pattern of viral integration into the cell genome (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated LSD1 (C69G12) Rabbit mAb #2184.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).