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Product listing: SETD2 (D5T1Q) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9BYW2 #23486 to SP1 (D4C3) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P08047 #9389

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SET domain-containing protein 2 (SETD2 or SET2), also known as lysine N-methyltransferase 3 A (KMT3A), huntingtin yeast partner B (HYBP), and huntingtin-interacting factor (HIF-1), is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein methyltransferase that is responsible for the majority of tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 36 (H3K36Me3) (1-3). SETD2-mediated H3K36Me3 is critical for proper regulation of transcription elongation, RNA splicing and DNA mismatch repair (1). SETD2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that is hyper-phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit Rpb1 (2-4). Upon hyper-phosphorylation of the RNAPII CTD during activation of transcriptional elongation, SETD2 is recruited and facilitates tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 36 in the body of transcriptionally active genes (2-4). H3K36Me3 then acts to recruit the transcription elongation factor FACT, which modulates nucleosome dynamics to facilitate transcription elongation and prevent cryptic transcriptional initiation (5). In addition, H3K36Me3 acts to recruit RNA-splicing proteins and regulate proper splicing of introns concurrent with transcriptional elongation (3, 6-9). In addition to regulating transcription, SETD2-dependent H3K36Me3 regulates DNA mismatch repair by recruiting MutSα (MSH2 and MSH6) to chromatin during G1 and early S phase (10). Loss of SETD2 results in an increase in microsatellite instability and elevated levels of spontaneous mutations (10). SETD2 is often mutated and/or inactivated in multiple types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma, leukemia, melanoma and liver cancer (11-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SIN3 was originally identified as a negative regulator of transcription in budding yeast (1,2). Since then, three isoforms of the SIN3 proteins have been identified in mammalian cells, as products of two different genes, SIN3A and SIN3B (3,4). Both SIN3A and SIN3B are nuclear proteins that function as scaffolding subunits for the multi-subunit SIN3 transcriptional repressor complex, containing SIN3A or SIN3B, HDAC1, HDAC2, SDS3, RBBP4/RBAP48, RBBP7/RBAP46, SAP30, and SAP18 (3,4). SIN3 proteins contain four paired amphipathic alpha-helix (PAH) motifs that function in the recruitment of the SIN3 complex to target genes by binding a multitude of DNA-binding transcriptional repressor proteins, including Mad1, p53, E2F4, HCF-1, AML1, Elk-1, NRSF, CTCF, ERα, and MeCP2 (3,4). In addition, SIN3 proteins contain an HDAC interaction domain (HID), which mediates binding of HDAC1 and HDAC2 via the SDS3 bridging protein, and a highly conserved region (HCR) at the carboxy terminus, which contributes to repressor protein binding (3,4). RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins also bind to SDS3 and contribute to nucleosome binding of the complex. The SIN3 complex functions to repress transcription, in part, by deacetylating histones at target gene promoters (3,4). In addition, recent studies have shown that SIN3 is recruited to the coding regions of repressed and active genes, where it deacetylates histones and suppresses spurious transcription by RNA polymerase II (3,5). In addition to histone deacetylase activity, the SIN3 complex associates with histone methyltransferase (ESET), histone demethylase (JARID1A/RBP2), ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling (SWI/SNF), methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) activities, all of which appear to contribute to the regulation of target genes (5-9). The SIN3 complex is critical for proper regulation of embryonic development, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA methylation (imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response and cell aging (1). SirT3, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, exists in human cells in two forms. The full-length 44 kDa protein localizes to the nucleus, while a processed 28 kDa protein lacking 142 amino terminal residues localizes exclusively to the mitochondria (2-4). The single murine form of SirT3 is equivalent to the processed human SirT3 protein (2). Full-length SirT3 protein is processed in the mitochondrial matrix by the mitochondrial matrix processing peptidase (MMP) (3). Both full-length and processed forms of SirT3 are enzymatically active and de-acetylate histone H3 at Lys9 and histone H4 at Lys16 in vitro (2). SirT3 also de-acetylates Lys642 of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (AceCS2) and activates AceCS2 activity in the mitochondria (5). Restricted caloric intake, which is linked to increased lifespan in multiple organisms, increases SirT3 expression in white and brown adipocytes of obese mice, suggesting a role for SirT3 in aging (6). Two observations implicate SirT3 in the regulation of mitochondrial thermogenesis. First, exposure to cold temperatures increases SirT3 expression in brown adipocytes, while elevated temperatures reduce SirT3 expression (6). Second, over-expression of SirT3 results in increased levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) (6). SirT3 protein levels are also elevated in certain breast cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response and cell aging (1). SirT3, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, exists in human cells in two forms. The full-length 44 kDa protein localizes to the nucleus, while a processed 28 kDa protein lacking 142 amino terminal residues localizes exclusively to the mitochondria (2-4). The single murine form of SirT3 is equivalent to the processed human SirT3 protein (2). Full-length SirT3 protein is processed in the mitochondrial matrix by the mitochondrial matrix processing peptidase (MMP) (3). Both full-length and processed forms of SirT3 are enzymatically active and de-acetylate histone H3 at Lys9 and histone H4 at Lys16 in vitro (2). SirT3 also de-acetylates Lys642 of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (AceCS2) and activates AceCS2 activity in the mitochondria (5). Restricted caloric intake, which is linked to increased lifespan in multiple organisms, increases SirT3 expression in white and brown adipocytes of obese mice, suggesting a role for SirT3 in aging (6). Two observations implicate SirT3 in the regulation of mitochondrial thermogenesis. First, exposure to cold temperatures increases SirT3 expression in brown adipocytes, while elevated temperatures reduce SirT3 expression (6). Second, over-expression of SirT3 results in increased levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) (6). SirT3 protein levels are also elevated in certain breast cancers (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT5, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized to the mitochondria and has been implicated in the regulation of cell metabolism (2,3). SirT5 deacetylates carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) in the mitochondrial matrix and increases its activity in response to fasting, allowing for adaptation to increased amino acid catabolism (4). SirT5 has also been shown to deacetylate cytochrome c in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (5). In addition to its deacetylase activity, SirT5 contains lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity (6,7). Succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine modifications occur in a variety of organisms and these post-translational modifications are found on many metabolic enzymes (6-8). Like phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues, lysine succinylation and malonylation induces a change of two negative charges from a +1 to a -1 charge at physiological pH, and are thought to serve similar functions in the regulation of protein activity, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability. SirT5 knockout mice show increased levels of succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine protein modifications in the liver, including increased succinylation of CPS1, a known target of SirT5, suggesting that SirT5 functions to regulate metabolic enzymes through its deacetylase, desuccinylase, and demalonylase activities (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT5, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized to the mitochondria and has been implicated in the regulation of cell metabolism (2,3). SirT5 deacetylates carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) in the mitochondrial matrix and increases its activity in response to fasting, allowing for adaptation to increased amino acid catabolism (4). SirT5 has also been shown to deacetylate cytochrome c in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (5). In addition to its deacetylase activity, SirT5 contains lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity (6,7). Succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine modifications occur in a variety of organisms and these post-translational modifications are found on many metabolic enzymes (6-8). Like phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues, lysine succinylation and malonylation induces a change of two negative charges from a +1 to a -1 charge at physiological pH, and are thought to serve similar functions in the regulation of protein activity, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability. SirT5 knockout mice show increased levels of succinyl-lysine and malonyl-lysine protein modifications in the liver, including increased succinylation of CPS1, a known target of SirT5, suggesting that SirT5 functions to regulate metabolic enzymes through its deacetylase, desuccinylase, and demalonylase activities (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT7, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized primarily in the nucleolus and is most prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells, especially myeloid progenitor cells (2). SirT7 is recruited to chromatin by sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors such as Elk-4, where it functions to deacetylate Lys18 of histone H3 at gene promoters and facilitate transcriptional repression (3). Interestingly, overexpression of SirT7 induces a global decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation levels, a phenotype that has been associated with poor prognosis in prostate, lung, kidney, and pancreatic cancers in the research literature (3-5). Furthermore, studies have also shown that SirT7 is required for the maintenance of several transformed phenotypes of cancer cells, including anchorage-independent cell growth, growth in low serum conditions, and tumor formation in xenograft assays (3). SirT7 is also required for the E1A-induced decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation, induction of cell-cycle entry, and escape from contact inhibition (3). Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that SirT7 is an important regulator of cellular transformation. Research has shown that the SirT7 gene is located on chromosome 17q25.3, a region that is frequently altered in acute leukemia and lymphoma (2), and SirT7 overexpression and amplification have been detected in multiple types of cancer (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SMARCA1 (SNF2L) is one of the two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). The ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes were first identified in Drosophila and have been shown to remodel and alter nucleosome spacing in vitro (2). SMARCA1 is the catalytic subunit of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) and CECR2-containing remodeling factor (CERF) complexes (3-5). The NURF complex plays an important role in neuronal physiology by promoting neurite outgrowth and regulation of Engrailed homeotic genes that are involved in neuronal development in the mid-hindbrain (3). NURF is also thought to be involved in the maturation of T cells from thymocytes by regulating chromatin structure and expression of genes important for T cell development (6). The largest subunit of the NURF complex, BPTF, is required for proper development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, suggesting a role for SMARCA1 in the development of the germ layers in mouse embryo (7). Disruption of the CERF complex by deletion of CECR2, an interacting partner of SMARCA1, is associated with the neural tube defect exencephaly, linking the CERF complex with regulation of neurulation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SMARCAL1 was first identified as a ubiquitously expressed member of the SNF2 family with homology to the E. coli protein HepA (1). Mutations in the gene encoding SMARCAL1 were subsequently shown to be the cause of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by phenotypes in multiple systems, including spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and impaired neurological function (2). Researchers have also associated SMARCAL1 deficiency with predisposition to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (3). The array of phenotypes associated with SMARCAL1 is likely due to its role as an annealing helicase in the DNA damage response. During DNA replication stress, SMARCAL1 is phosphorylated by DNA repair kinases (ATM, ATR, DNA-PK) (4). SMARCAL1 deficiency sensitizes cells to replication stress agents, and appears to increase the frequency of replication fork breakdown (4,5). SMARCAL1 is also required for efficient DNA double strand break repair via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway (6). Researchers have suggested that inhibitors targeting SMARCAL1 may be effective in sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents (reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as transcription and DNA replication and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits and contains a single molecule of either BRM or BRG1 as the ATPase catalytic subunit. The activity of the ATPase subunit disrupts histone-DNA contacts and changes the accessibility of crucial regulatory elements to the chromatin. The additional core and accessory subunits play a scaffolding role to maintain stability and provide surfaces for interaction with various transcription factors and chromatin (2-5). The interactions between SWI/SNF subunits and transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, Rb, BRCA1, and MyoD, facilitate recruitment of the complex to target genes for regulation of gene activation, cell growth, cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The most well characterized nuclear receptor corepressors are NCoR1 (nuclear receptor corepressor) and its close paralog NCoR2, also know as SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors) (1,2). NCoR1 and SMRT function to transcriptionally silence various unliganded, DNA bound non-steroidal nuclear receptors by serving as a large molecular scaffold that bridges the receptors with multiple chromatin remodeling factors that repress nuclear receptor-mediated gene transcription, in part, through deacetylation of core histones surrounding target promoters. Indeed, the N-terminal portion of NCoR1 and SMRT possess multiple distinct transcriptional repression domains (RDs) responsible for the recruitment of additional components of the corepressor complex such as HDACs, mSin3, GPS2, and TBL1/TBLR1. In between the RDs lies a pair of potent repressor motifs known as SANT motifs (SWI3, ADA2, N-CoR, and TFIIIB), which recruit HDAC3 and histones to the repressor complex in order to enhance HDAC3 activity (3). The C-terminal portion of NCoR1 and SMRT contain multiple nuclear receptor interaction domains (NDs), each of which contains a conserved CoRNR box (or L/I-X-X-I/V-I) motif that allow for binding to various unliganded nuclear hormone receptors such as thyroid hormone (THR) and retinoic acid (RAR) receptors (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SET and MYND domain-containing protein 2 (SMYD2), also known as lysine methyltransferase protein 3C (KMT3C), is a member of the SMYD family of protein methyltransferases (1). All five members of this family (SMYD1, SMYD2, SMYD3, SMYD4, and SMYD5) contain a conserved catalytic SET domain, originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. This domain is split by the MYN domain/zinc finger motif believed to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). SMYD2 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, and is highly expressed in the adult mouse heart, brain, liver, kidney, thymus, and ovary, as well as in the developing mouse embryo (1). SMYD2 functions to repress transcription by interacting with the Sin3A repressor complex and methylating Lys36 of histone H3 (1). SMYD2 also interacts with HSP90α and methylates Lys4 of histone H3, a mark associated with transcriptional activation (2). In addition to histones as methyl substrates, SMYD2 methylates p53 at Lys370 to repress p53-mediated transcriptional activation and apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a member of the SET domain-containing family of protein methyltransferases and is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm (1-3). Several histone substrates have been identified for SMYD3; however, the data is controversial. In one study, SMYD3 has been shown to methylate histone H3 Lys4 (both di- and tri-methylation) and interact with RNA polymerase II to activate transcription (1). A second study has shown that SMYD3 preferentially methylates histone H4 Lys20 and interacts with nuclear receptor corepressor complex (NCOR) to repress transcription (2). A third study has shown that SMYD3 preferentially methylates histone H4 Lys5 (mono-, di-, and tri-methylation) (3). In addition, SMYD3 has been shown to methylate the endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) on Lys831 and stimulate its kinase activity (4). Regardless of the preferred protein substrates, it is clear that SMYD3 functions as an oncogene. Research studies have shown SMYD3 is highly over-expressed in liver, breast, and rectal carcinomas. Over-expression of SMYD3 in multiple cell lines enhances proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while reduced expression results in significant suppression of cell growth (1,5-10). In addition, multiple cancer cell lines express both full length SMYD3 and a cleaved form of SMYD3 lacking the N-terminal 34 amino acids, and the cleaved form shows increased methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sucrose nonfermenting 2 homolog (SNF2H, SMARCA5) is one of two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). SNF2H is part of the SNF2 family of chromatin remodeling factors that use ATP hydrolysis to catalyze biochemical reactions in several mammalian chromatin-remodeling complexes, including ACF1, RSF1, CHRAC, NoRC, WSTF, and WCRF180 (2). Research studies show that SNF2H is crucial for chromatin organization, DNA damage response, and differentiation (1-7). The SNF2H helicase facilitates DNA damage repair by actively moving nucleosomes for DNA damage response (DDR) proteins to effectively associate with damaged regions (3). Additional studies show that repair of double stranded breaks (DSBs) significantly decreases in the absence of SNF2H (3), and these cells become highly sensitive to DNA damage caused by x-rays and chemical treatments inducing DSBs (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated SP1 (D4C3) Rabbit mAb #9389.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Specificity protein 1 (SP1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor belonging to the family of C2H2-type zinc finger containing DNA-binding proteins. SP1 binds GC-rich motifs with high affinity and regulates the expression of numerous mammalian genes (1,2). It interacts with many other transcription factors, such as c-Myc, EGR1, and Stat1, and with basal transcription machinery components. SP1 interacts with chromatin-modifying factors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 in chromatin remodeling. Transcriptional activity and stability of SP1 are regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and glycosylation (3). Glycosylation of SP1 following insulin treatment leads to increased nuclear localization, while glucagon treatment increases cytoplasmic SP1 levels (4-6). Investigators have found high levels of SP1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (7).