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Product listing: Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) Antibody, UniProt ID P68431 #4353 to DMAP1 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9NPF5 #13326

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
C. elegans, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian imitation SWI (ISWI) complexes are characterized by two ATPase subunits: Snf2h and Snf2l (1). Snf2h interacts with ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1 (ACF1) to comprise the ACF chromatin-remodeling complex (1). ACF1 (BAZ1A) has distinct roles in development (2), regulation of chromatin structure (3), and DNA damage response (4,5). Different developmental stages dictate the expression of ACF1 in Drosophila, and alterations in ACF1 expression during Drosophila development leads to deviation from normal chromatin organization (2). ACF1 functions in heterochromatin formation during development and is involved in the initial establishment of diversified chromatin structures. In vivo studies demonstrate that heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 is enhanced by the interaction of ACF1 with chromatin (6). Chromatin-remodeling factors are required during DNA damage in order to allow signaling molecules and damaging enzymes to access the site (4). Depletion of hACF1 increases apoptosis and vulnerability to radiation and compromises G2/M arrest activated in response to X-ray and UV exposure (4). Depletion of ACF1 also sensitizes cells to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and impairs DNA repair (5). Specifically, accumulation of Ku at DSBs sites may depend on the presence of ACF1 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein acetylation is a common modification that occurs both at lysine residues within proteins (ε-amino acetylation) and multiple amino acid residues at the amino terminus of proteins (α-amino acetylation). The N-α-acetyltransferase ARD1 homolog A protein (ARD1A, also known as NAA10) and the highly homologous N-α-acetyltransferase ARD1 homolog B protein (ARD1B, also known as ARD2 or NAA11) are mutually exclusive catalytic subunits of the amino-terminal acetyltransferase complex (NatA) (1-3). This complex, which consists of either ARD1A or ARD1B and the N-α-acetyltransferase 15 (NAA15) auxiliary protein, localizes to ribosomes where it functions to acetylate Ser-, Ala-, Gly-, Thr-, Cys-, Pro-, and Val- amino termini after initiator methionine cleavage during protein translation (1-5). Like ε-amino acetylation, amino-terminal α-amino acetylation functions to regulate protein stability, activity, cellular localization, and protein-protein interactions (4,5). Defects in ARD1A have been shown to cause amino-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency (NATD), which results in severe delays and defects in postnatal growth (6).In addition to functioning as amino-terminal acetyltransferases in the NatA complex, free ARD1A and ARD1B proteins regulate cell growth and differentiation through ε-amino acetylation of lysine residues in multiple target proteins, including the HIF-1α, β-catenin, and AP-1 transcription factors (7-9). ARD1A-mediated acetylation of HIF-1α at Lys532 under normoxic conditions enhances binding of VHL, leading to increased ubiquitination and degradation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of HIF-1α target genes involved in angiogenesis, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, and glucose metabolism (7). Decreased expression of ARD1A under hypoxic conditions contributes to the stabilization of HIF-1α and upregulation of target genes (7). ARD1A also promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by acetylating and activating β-catenin and AP-1 transcription factors, leading to the stimulation of cyclin D1 expression (8,9). Interestingly, the acetyltransferase activity of ARD1A is regulated by autoacetylation at Lys136, which is required for the ability of ARD1A to promote proliferation and tumorigenesis (9). Research studies have shown that ARD1 proteins are over-expressed in multiple cancers, including breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins) are RNA-guided nuclease effectors that are utilized for precise genome editing in mammalian systems (1). Cpf1 (CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella) are members of the Class 2 CRISPR system (2). Class 2 CRISPR systems, such as the well characterized Cas9, rely on single-component effector proteins to mediate DNA interference (3). Cpf1 endonucleases, compared to Cas9 systems, have several unique features that increase the utility of CRISPR-based genome editing techniques: 1) Cpf1-mediated cleavage relies on a single and short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) without the requirement of a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), 2) Cpf1 utilizes T-Rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences rather than a G-Rich PAM, and 3) Cpf1 generates a staggered, rather than a blunt-ended, DNA double-stranded break (2). These features broaden the utility of using CRISPR-Cas systems for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications. Several Cpf1 bacterial orthologs have been characterized for CRISPR-mediated mammalian genome editing (2, 4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ASF1 was first identified in S. cerevisiae based on its ability to de-repress transcriptional silencing when overexpressed (1). While only one gene exists in yeast and Drosophila, mammalian cells contain the two highly homologous ASF1A and ASF1B genes (2). ASF1A and ASF1B function as histone chaperones, delivering histone H3/H4 dimers to CAF-1 or HIRA histone deposition complexes to facilitate replication-coupled and replication-independent nucleosome assembly on DNA (2-5). Both ASF1A and ASF1B bind to CAF-1, but only ASF1A binds to HIRA (5). In addition to playing a role in DNA replication and gene silencing, ASF1 functions in DNA damage repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. Deletion of ASF1 in yeast and Drosophila confers sensitivity to various DNA damaging agents and inhibitors of DNA replication, increases genomic instability and sister chromatid exchange, and activates the DNA damage checkpoint (6-8). Depletion of both ASF1A and ASF1B in mammalian cells results in the accumulation of cells in S phase, increased phosphorylation of H2A.X, centrosome amplification and apoptosis (9,10). ASF1A is required for the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF), with overexpression of ASF1A inducing senescence in primary cells (4). Both ASF1A and ASF1B are phosphorylated in S phase by the Tousled-like kinases TLK1 and TLK2, and are dephosphorylated when TLK1 and TLK2 are inactivated by Chk1 kinase in response to replicative stress (11,12). The function of ASF1 phosphorylation is not yet understood.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of various nuclear processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication, and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits with a single molecule of the ATPase catalytic subunit BRM or BRG1, but not both. The activities of these two subunits drive the disruption of histone-DNA contacts that lead to changes in accessibility of crucial regulatory elements within chromatin (2-5). The BRM/BRG1 containing SWI/SNF complexes are recruited to target promoters by transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, RB, and BRCA1 to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9). BRM and BRG1 are also considered to be tumor suppressors and their expression levels are severely reduced in several cancer cell lines (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: B-TATA binding protein-associated factor 1 (BTAF1) is a human homolog of the yeast protein modifier of transcription 1 (MOT1) (1). BTAF1 negatively regulates transcription through interaction with TATA binding protein (TBP), an important component of the B-TFIID complex (2,3). BTAF1 is a member of the SNF2 family of ATPases that utilizes ATP to remove TBP from B-TFIID, thereby preventing formation of the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) (3-5). BTAF1 actively removes TBP from DNA, which prevents non-specific TBP-DNA interactions and promotes disassembly of inactive forms of the PIC. This activity is thought to be critical for maintaining a pool of free TBP that is necessary for the assembly of the PIC during transcription activation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) is an RNA-guided DNA nuclease and part of the CRISPR antiviral immunity system that provides adaptive immunity against extra chromosomal genetic material (1). The CRISPR antiviral mechanism of action involves three steps: (i), acquisition of foreign DNA by host bacterium; (ii), synthesis and maturation of CRISPR RNA (crRNA), followed by the formation of RNA-Cas nuclease protein complexes; and (iii), target interference through recognition of foreign DNA by the complex and its cleavage by Cas nuclease activity (2). The type II CRISPR/Cas antiviral immunity system provides a powerful tool for precise genome editing and has potential for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications (3). The Cas9 protein and a guide RNA consisting of a fusion between a crRNA and a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) must be introduced or expressed in a cell. A 20-nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of the guide RNA directs Cas9 to a specific DNA target site. As a result, Cas9 can be "programmed" to cut various DNA sites both in vitro and in cells and organisms. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tools have been used in many organisms, including mouse and human cells (4,5). Research studies demonstrate that CRISPR can be used to generate mutant alleles or reporter genes in rodents and primate embryonic stem cells (6-8).Cas9 (S. aureus) is a Cas9 ortholog that is smaller, but as efficient, as the more commonly used Cas9 ortholog, Cas9 (S. Pyogenes) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. This histone methyl-transferase activity requires the Ezh2, Eed, and Suz12 subunits of the complex (5). Histone H3 methylation at Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (6). CBX4 is a component of the PRC1 complex, which together with Ring1 strongly enhances the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the Ring2 catalytic subunit (7,8). CBX4 itself is a SUMO E3 ligase, and its function influences EMT, DNA damage response, tumor angiogenesis, and self-renewal (9-13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and replication of the eukaryotic genome. The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. In addition to the growing number of post-translational histone modifications regulating chromatin structure, cells can also exchange canonical histones with variant histones that can directly or indirectly modulate chromatin structure (1). CENP-A, also known as the chromatin-associated protein CSE4 (capping-enzyme suppressor 4-p), is an essential histone H3 variant that replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric heterochromatin (2). The greatest divergence between CENP-A and canonical histone H3 occurs in the amino-terminal tail of the protein, which binds linker DNA between nucleosomes and facilitates proper folding of centromeric heterochromatin (3). The amino-terminal tail of CENP-A is also required for recruitment of other centromeric proteins (CENP-C, hSMC1, hZW10), proper kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis (4). Additional sequence divergence in the histone fold domain is responsible for correct targeting of CENP-A to the centromere (5). Many of the functions of CENP-A are regulated by phosphorylation (6,7). Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of CENP-A on Ser7 during prophase is required for proper targeting of Aurora B to the inner centromere in prometaphase, proper kinetochore/microtubule attachment and proper alignment of chromosomes during mitosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of proteins, which consists of nine members, has been divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All of the CHD proteins contain two tandem N-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a C-terminal DNA binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes the energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD1 is a euchromatic protein that associates with the promoters of active genes, and is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (3-6). The two chromodomains of CHD1 facilitate its recruitment to active genes by binding to methyl-lysine 4 of histone H3, a mark associated with transcriptional activation (4-6). Yeast CHD1 is a component of the SAGA and SLIK histone acetyltransferase complexes, and is believed to link histone methylation with histone acetylation during transcriptional activation (6). The CHD2 protein is not well characterized; however, mouse knockout studies suggest important functions in development and tumor suppression. Homozygous CHD2 knockout mice exhibit delayed growth and perinatal lethality (7). Heterozygous knockout mice show increased mortality and gross organ abnormalities, in addition to increased extramedullary hematopoiesis and susceptibility to lymphomas (7,8). CHD2 mutant cells are defective in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and exhibit aberrant DNA damage responses (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of nine proteins is divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All CHD proteins contain two tandem amino-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD proteins are often found in large, multiprotein complexes with their transcriptional activation or repression activity governed by other proteins within the complex. CHD3 (also known as Mi2-α) and CHD4 (also known as Mi2-β) are central components of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains HDAC1, HDAC2, RBAP48, RBAP46, MTA1, MTA2, MTA3, and MBD3 (3-8). Both CHD3 and CHD4 contain two plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc finger domains that bind directly to HDAC1 and HDAC2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of nine proteins is divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All CHD proteins contain two tandem amino-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD proteins are often found in large, multiprotein complexes with their transcriptional activation or repression activity governed by other proteins within the complex. CHD3 (also known as Mi2-α) and CHD4 (also known as Mi2-β) are central components of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains HDAC1, HDAC2, RBAP48, RBAP46, MTA1, MTA2, MTA3, and MBD3 (3-8). Both CHD3 and CHD4 contain two plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc finger domains that bind directly to HDAC1 and HDAC2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CHD8 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by utilizing the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin architecture (1,2). The nine CHD family members are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). In addition, CHD8 contains three CR (conserved region) domains, a SANT (switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB)-like domain, two BRK (brahma and kismet) domains, and a DNA-binding domain (2). The chromatin remodeling activity of CHD8 has been shown to be important for the regulation of a wide variety of genes, such as the HOX genes (5) and genes that are driven by β-catenin (6), p53 (7), estrogen receptor (8), or androgen receptor (9). CHD8 can also interact with the insulator binding protein CTCF and is required for CTCF insulator activity at multiple gene loci (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The CXXC finger protein 1 (CXXC1, CGBP, CFP1) is a key subunit of the human SET1 histone methyltransferase complex (1,2) that methylates histone H3 at Lys4 to create a mark of transcriptionally active promoters (3,4). CXXC1 is enriched at CpG islands where it selectively binds non-methylated CpG motifs to provide a link between global H3K4 methylation and CpG islands (5). Research studies have revealed a role for CXXC1 in the maintenance of cytosine methylation through direct interaction with DNMT1 (6-9). The epigenetic functions of CXXC1 are critical for normal embryonic development. Targeted deletion of the murine Cxxc1 gene results in early embryonic lethality while Cxxc1-null embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit increased apoptosis and fail to undergo differentiation in vitro following withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor LIF (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Deleted in breast cancer gene 1 protein (DBC1) was originally identified by its localization to a region of chromosome 8p21 that is homozygously deleted in breast cancer (1). DBC1 is a large, nuclear protein with multiple functions in cell survival. It binds directly to the estrogen receptor α (ERα) hormone-binding domain in a ligand-independent manner and may be a key determinant of ligand-independent ERα expression and survival in human breast cancer cells (2). DBC1 can promote p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the deacetylase activity of SirT1, resulting in increased p53 acetylation levels and activity (3). DBC1 may be an important regulator of heterochromatin formation as it binds SUV39H1 and inhibits its histone methyltransferase activity (4). Caspase-dependent processing activates the pro-apoptotic activity of DBC1 during Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α)-mediated cell death signaling (5). This processing of DBC1 in response to TNF-α is an early event in the onset of apoptosis and results in relocalization of DBC1 to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of the processed, cytoplasmic form of DBC1 results in mitochondrial clustering and matrix condensation and sensitizes cells to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis.

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)-associated protein 1 (DMAP1) is a nuclear protein that functions in transcriptional repression and DNA repair. DMAP1 was first identified as an activator of DNMT1 methyltransferase activity (1). Both DMAP1 and DNMT1 are targeted to replication foci during S phase and function to transfer proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication (1). In late S phase, DMAP1-DNMT1 co-operate with a p33ING1-Sin3-HDAC2 complex to maintain pericentric heterochromatin by deacetylating histones, methylating histone H3 at Lys9, and methylating DNA (1,2). The DMAP1 protein is also part of the TIP60-p400 complex, a histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and chromatin-remodeling complex that functions in DNA repair (3,4). Upon DNA damage, the TIP60-p400 complex acetylates histone H4 at Lys16 to induce chromatin relaxation and activation of the ATM kinase. DMAP1 is required for DNA-damage induced TIP60-p400-mediated histone acetylation, and deletion of DMAP1 impairs AMT function (5). DMAP1-DNMT1 may also methylate DNA at sites of DNA damage during homologous recombination, which results in gene silencing (6).