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Product listing: CD71 (D7G9X) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P02786 #13113 to EB-1 (1A11/4) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID Q15691 #2164

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transferrin receptor 1 (CD71, TFRC) is a type II transmembrane receptor and carrier protein responsible for the uptake of cellular iron through receptor-mediated endocytosis (1). Neutral pH at the cell surface promotes binding of the iron-binding glycoprotein transferrin (Tf) to the CD71 receptor. The receptor-ligand complex enters the cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis and is internalized into an endosome. Relatively lower endosomal pH leads to a change in the local charge environment surrounding the iron-transferrin binding site and results in the release of iron (2). The receptor-ligand complex is recycled to the cell surface where transferrin dissociates from the CD71 receptor (2). Ubiquitously expressed transferrin receptor is continuously recycled and undergoes clathrin-mediated endocytosis regardless of ligand binding state. The interaction between receptor and ligand has been studied in detail. The helical domain of CD71 directly interacts with the transferrin C-lobe and induces a conformation change in Tf to facilitate the transport process (3). Interaction between the receptor CD71 and transferrin is mediated by the membrane protein hemochromatosis (HFE). HFE binds the α-helical domain of CD71, blocking formation of the CD71-transferrin complex and inhibiting iron uptake (4,5). In addition to binding transferrin, CD71 also interacts with H-ferritin at the cell surface and transports this intracellular iron storage protein to cellular endosomes and lysosomes (6). Additional studies indicate that the transferrin receptor is an evolutionarily conserved receptor for a number or arenaviruses and at least one retrovirus (7,8). Aberrant expression of CD71 is seen in a number of cancers, including thyroid carcinomas, lymphomas, and T-lineage leukemias, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for targeted inhibition of the transferrin receptor (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transferrin receptor 1 (CD71, TFRC) is a type II transmembrane receptor and carrier protein responsible for the uptake of cellular iron through receptor-mediated endocytosis (1). Neutral pH at the cell surface promotes binding of the iron-binding glycoprotein transferrin (Tf) to the CD71 receptor. The receptor-ligand complex enters the cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis and is internalized into an endosome. Relatively lower endosomal pH leads to a change in the local charge environment surrounding the iron-transferrin binding site and results in the release of iron (2). The receptor-ligand complex is recycled to the cell surface where transferrin dissociates from the CD71 receptor (2). Ubiquitously expressed transferrin receptor is continuously recycled and undergoes clathrin-mediated endocytosis regardless of ligand binding state. The interaction between receptor and ligand has been studied in detail. The helical domain of CD71 directly interacts with the transferrin C-lobe and induces a conformation change in Tf to facilitate the transport process (3). Interaction between the receptor CD71 and transferrin is mediated by the membrane protein hemochromatosis (HFE). HFE binds the α-helical domain of CD71, blocking formation of the CD71-transferrin complex and inhibiting iron uptake (4,5). In addition to binding transferrin, CD71 also interacts with H-ferritin at the cell surface and transports this intracellular iron storage protein to cellular endosomes and lysosomes (6). Additional studies indicate that the transferrin receptor is an evolutionarily conserved receptor for a number or arenaviruses and at least one retrovirus (7,8). Aberrant expression of CD71 is seen in a number of cancers, including thyroid carcinomas, lymphomas, and T-lineage leukemias, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for targeted inhibition of the transferrin receptor (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDC37 is an important component of the HSP90 chaperone complex (1,2). It was initially identified for its involvement in cell-cycle progression and was later found to have a much broader role as a chaperone for a wide variety of kinases and other proteins (1-3). CDC37 protein has an amino-terminal kinase binding domain followed by a central HSP90 binding domain. It recruits and stabilizes kinases in the HSP90 complex by protecting the newly synthesized kinase peptide chain from degradation and promoting the next step of protein maturation (4,5). CDC37 also suppresses the ATPase activity of HSP90, thereby leading to conformational changes in the complex that preclude target kinase loading (6). CDC37 has been proposed as a therapeutic target because of its important role in multiple kinase pathways involved in proliferation and cancer cell survival, including Raf, Akt, Src, and ErbB2 pathways (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Rho family of small GTPases, including Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, act as molecular switches that regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP (1). The serine- and proline-rich GAP protein, Cdc42 GAP (CdGAP), has been shown to be a negative regulator of both Cdc42 and Rac1, but not RhoA (2,3). This protein contains three domains: an amino-terminal GAP domain, a central domain, and a carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain containing five Src homology 3 (SH3)-binding sites. It is suggested that threonine and serine phosphorylation within the proline-rich domain likely alters protein-protein interactions and determines the localization of CdGAP (4). Phosphorylation of CdGAP on threonine 776 by both ERK-1 and GSK-3 has been shown to negatively regulate protein activity, possibly by inducing a conformational change within the protein disrupting its ability to bind SH3 domains (4,5). Upregulation of CdGAP has been shown to increase cell proliferation and it has been suggested that this protein may play a role in TGF-β-induced cell growth, motility, and invasion in some breast cancer cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ch-TOG (colonic hepatic tumor overexpressed gene)/CKAP5 (cytoskeleton-associated protein 5) is a microtubule stabilizing protein involved in the organization of mitotic spindle poles through interaction with the transforming acid coiled-coil protein, TACC3 (1). Ch-TOG and TACC3 also interact with the membrane trafficking protein clathrin, and this interaction is thought to be required for clathrin’s mitotic function in crosslinking microtubules in the mitotic spindle (2). Researchers have found that expression levels of both TACC3 and ch-TOG are correlated with human diseases such as glioblastoma and hepatic carcinoma (3). A genome-wide siRNA screen identified ch-TOG and other G2/M phase regulators as potential contributors to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHMP2B is a component of the ESCRT III (endosomal sorting required for transport complex III) complex (1, 2). The ESCRT system is composed of the ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III complexes, which function sequentially to direct the transport of ubiquitinated transmembrane proteins into the intralumenal vesicles (ILVs), which will eventually mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). CHMP2B is a homolog of yeast Vps2, which functions in the ESCRT-II complex to change the initial spiral-structure of snf7 into membrane-sculpting helices for the final pinch off process (3). CHMP2B probably functions similarly in mammalian cells. Research studies show that manipulation of the ESCRT-III complex leads to accumulation of CHMP2B at the plasma membrane and overexpressed CHMP2B polymerizes into a tight helical structure that deforms the shape of associated plasma membrane (4).Research studies have shown that mutation of CHMP2B is associated with frontotemporal dementia, (5, 6). Studies have further shown that the dysfunction of mutant CHMP2B expression may disrupts the normal endo-autophagosome and endo-lysosome pathways and lead to neurodegenerative diseases (6-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin is a conserved actin-severing protein required for processes that rely on actin dynamics, including cytokinesis and cell motility (reviewed in 1). Regulation of actin dynamics requires the controlled cycling between the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of cofilin (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at the conserved amino-terminal Ser3 of cofilin (3,4). Slingshot (SSH) phosphatase, for which there have been three mammalian isoforms identified, dephosphorylates cofilin in vivo (5). Chronophin (CIN, PDXP) is a haloacid dehalogenase phosphatase that also dephosphorylates cofilin. Alteration of CIN activity through overexpression of either the wildtype or phosphatase-inactive mutant CIN interferes with actin dynamics, cell morphology and cytokinesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CIN85 was independently identified as Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa (1), Ruk (regulator of ubiquitous kinase) (2), SETA (SH3 domain-containing gene expressed in tumorigenic astrocytes) (3), and SH3KBP1 (SH3 domain kinase binding protein 1) (4). The genes encoding these proteins were isolated from either human (CIN85), rat (Ruk and SETA), or mouse (SH3KBP1) sources and share between 92% and 97% sequence identity, suggesting that they represent homologues of one gene. Differential promoter usage and alternative splicing is thought to occur in a tissue specific and developmentally regulated manner to generate a complex expression pattern of various transcripts and encoded protein isoforms (5). The main isoform in humans, CIN85, contains three N-terminal SH3 domains, a proline-rich region harboring several P-X-X-P motifs that provide recognition sites for SH3 domain-containing proteins, a PEST sequence implicated in CIN85 degradation, and a C-terminal coiled-coil region for oligomerization (1,2,5,6). The other molecular variants of CIN85 are shorter, N-terminally truncated proteins lacking one, two, or all three of the SH3 domains (1,5,6-8). Proteomic screens suggest that CIN85 is phosphorylated at multiple sites and the role of phosphorylation of some of these sites in regulation of intra- and intermolecular interactions of CIN85 cannot be excluded. CIN85 belongs to the CD2AP/CMS family of adaptor proteins and has been shown to interact with signaling molecules such as c-Cbl, Cbl-b, BLNK, p85/PI3K, GRB2, p130 Cas, and endophilins to coordinate the activity of multiple signaling cascades. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that CIN85 is required for the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including vesicle-mediated transport (9-12), signal transduction (13,14), and cytoskeleton remodelling (15).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology® antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cofilin (D3F9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5175.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cool/Pix proteins comprise a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) localized to focal adhesions. The family consists of two isoforms, cool2/αPix and cool1/βPix, the latter having two splice variants that vary in their carboxy termini (1). Cool2/αPix, like other GEFs, has a DH (Dbl homology) domain, which allows binding of small GTPases and GDP/GTP exchange, and a PH (Pleckstrin homology) domain (2).X-chromosomal genes mutated in nonspecific mental retardation (MRX) comprise a family of genes, including the gene encoding Cool2/αPix, thought to be involved in mental retardation (3,4).Cool2/αPix interacts with β-parvin/affixin, a protein involved in integrin signaling (5), and may act downstream of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) to regulate actin reorganization and cell spreading (6).When Cool2αPix exists as a dimer, it functions as a Rac-specific GEF, whereas the monomeric protein acts as a GEF for both Rac and Cdc42. Regulation of Cool2/αPix dimerization, and therefore its specificity, occurs at least in part through p21 activated kinase (PAK) in response to extracellular signaling (7). Further, binding of Cdc42 enhances the Rac GEF activity of the Cool2/αPix dimer. Activated Rac in turn inhibits Cool2/αPix Rac GEF activity (8).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Coronin 1A (D6K5B) XP® Rabbit mAb #92904.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The coronin family of actin-binding proteins regulates a variety of cellular functions, including migration, phagocytosis, and cytokinesis. Coronin 1A is highly expressed in lymphocytes, and is required for appropriate immune regulation in mice and humans. Researchers are investigating coronin 1A as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers (1,2). Coronin 1A affects bone resorption through its regulation of lysosome fusion and secretion of cathepsin K in osteoclasts (3). In the nervous system, coronin 1A has been shown to regulate GPCR signaling and neurite outgrowth (4,5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Coronin 1A (D6K5B) XP® Rabbit mAb #92904.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The coronin family of actin-binding proteins regulates a variety of cellular functions, including migration, phagocytosis, and cytokinesis. Coronin 1A is highly expressed in lymphocytes, and is required for appropriate immune regulation in mice and humans. Researchers are investigating coronin 1A as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers (1,2). Coronin 1A affects bone resorption through its regulation of lysosome fusion and secretion of cathepsin K in osteoclasts (3). In the nervous system, coronin 1A has been shown to regulate GPCR signaling and neurite outgrowth (4,5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Coronin 1A (D6K5B) XP® Rabbit mAb #92904.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The coronin family of actin-binding proteins regulates a variety of cellular functions, including migration, phagocytosis, and cytokinesis. Coronin 1A is highly expressed in lymphocytes, and is required for appropriate immune regulation in mice and humans. Researchers are investigating coronin 1A as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers (1,2). Coronin 1A affects bone resorption through its regulation of lysosome fusion and secretion of cathepsin K in osteoclasts (3). In the nervous system, coronin 1A has been shown to regulate GPCR signaling and neurite outgrowth (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The coronin family of actin-binding proteins regulates a variety of cellular functions, including migration, phagocytosis, and cytokinesis. Coronin 1A is highly expressed in lymphocytes, and is required for appropriate immune regulation in mice and humans. Researchers are investigating coronin 1A as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers (1,2). Coronin 1A affects bone resorption through its regulation of lysosome fusion and secretion of cathepsin K in osteoclasts (3). In the nervous system, coronin 1A has been shown to regulate GPCR signaling and neurite outgrowth (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The coronin family of actin-binding proteins regulates a variety of cellular functions, including migration, phagocytosis, and cytokinesis. Coronin 1A is highly expressed in lymphocytes, and is required for appropriate immune regulation in mice and humans. Researchers are investigating coronin 1A as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers (1,2). Coronin 1A affects bone resorption through its regulation of lysosome fusion and secretion of cathepsin K in osteoclasts (3). In the nervous system, coronin 1A has been shown to regulate GPCR signaling and neurite outgrowth (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Disabled homologue 2 (Dab2) is a mitogen responsive phosphoprotein that exerts multiple functions through association with numerous proteins. Dab2 modulates signaling pathways through interactions with proteins such as Smads and TGF-β receptors (1,2), axin (3), GRB (4) and Src (5). Dab2 also serves as a cargo-specific adaptor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis via interaction with clathrin (6), AP2 (7), NPXY-containing cargo (8-10), and myosin VI (11,12). In addition, Dab2 regulates cell adhesion by directly binding integrins (13,14). The diverse functions of Dab2 enable it to coordinate cell adhesion, cell motility, membrane trafficking, and signaling. Research studies have shown Dab2 is down-regulated in a number of cancers, thereby suggesting a role as a tumor suppressor (15-17). Phosphorylation of Dab2 decreases its endocytotic function (18).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished and expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein or GFAP (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin) and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined relative to other markers to distinguish between the two forms of neoplasm (3). Desmin is a myogenic marker expressed in early development that forms a network of filaments that extends across the myofibril and surrounds Z discs. The desmin cytoskeleton provides a connection among myofibrils, organelles and the cytoskeleton (4). Desmin knockout mice develop cardiomyopathy, skeletal and smooth muscle defects (5). In humans, desmin related myopathies might be caused by mutations in the corresponding desmin gene or in proteins with which desmin interacts, including αB-crystallin and synemin. Disorganized desmin filaments and the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised predominantly of desmin characterize desmin-related myopathies (reviewed in 6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Formins are a family of large multidomain actin nucleation/polymerization proteins characterized by their catalytic FH2 domains. The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia/diap) subfamily, including mDia1/diap1, mDia2/diap3 and mDia3/diap2, are effectors of Rho family small GTPases. In response to Rho, mDia/diap proteins are involved in the regulation of multiple cell functions including cytoskeletal dynamics, migration, adhesion, polarity and cell shape (reviewed in 1,2).mDia1/diap1 is activated by GTP-bound Rho, leading to Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-dependent stress fiber formation (3,4). Rho activation of mDia1 has also been shown to regulate serum response factor (SRF)-dependent transcription (5), and has been implicated in human cancer phenotypes such as ras-mediated transformation, metastasis and invasion (reviewed in 6).mDia3/diap2, activated by the Rho family small GTPase cdc42, regulates the attachment of microtubules to the kinetochore during mitosis in mammalian cells (7).Rho-dependent activation of mDia2/diap3 is important in assembly of the contractile ring during cytokinesis (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOCK180 and its partner, ELMO1, interact directly with one another to form an atypical two-part guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac (1). Rac activation occurs in association with p130 Cas and Crk, which form a complex with DOCK180 that is targeted to focal adhesions (2,3). DOCK180 is also recruited to the plasma membrane by binding to phosphoinositides (4). ELMO1 may function as an inhibitor of proteasome-dependent degradation of DOCK180 at the plasma membrane to regulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton (5). Localized Rac activation allows actin nucleation via WAVE family proteins, signaling to integrins, formation of lamellipodia and filopodia, and regulation of processes such as phagocytosis and cell migration (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytoplasmic dynein is a multi-subunit motor complex that regulates microtubule organization as well as the transport and positioning of organelles. Dynactin is a multi-subunit dynein-activating complex, which regulates the interaction of the dynein motor with various cellular cargoes, and enhances dynein’s processivity. p150Glued/DCTN1/Dynactin 1 is the largest subunit of the dynactin complex (1-3). In mitosis, cytoplasmic dynein regulates spindle organization, chromosome movement and centrosome separation (4). The dynactin subunit p150Glued is phosphorylated at serine 19 by the mitotic kinase aurora A during anaphase, and this phosphorylation is required for the appropriate regulation of spindle assembly (5). In neurons, axonal transport is important for cellular function and survival. Dysfunction and mutations in dynein and dynactin subunits, including p150Glued, have been linked to human neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease (6-7), Perry Syndrome (8) and ALS (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EB1 (end-binding protein 1) is a microtubule associated protein (1). EB1 localizes to the growing ends of microtubules, the centrosome and the mitotic spindle (2-4). EB1 is also found to associate with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein (5). Recent studies also suggest that EB1 plays a role in microtubule-based transport (6).