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Product listing: PAK2 (C17A10) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q13177 #2615 to Phospho-Vimentin (Ser56) (D5H2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P08670 #7391

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The actin-associated scaffold protein, palladin, is associated with multiple actin-rich structures, and plays a role in cellular migration and invasion (1). Palladin regulates the formation of invasive structures called podosomes and invadopodia (1-3). Alternative splicing results in at least three palladin isoforms, including the widely expressed 140 kDa and 90 kDa isoforms (2). Palladin has been shown to promote invasion in basal-like breast carcinoma models (4). Palladin is also upregulated in injured kidneys, and promotes migration of kidney cells to facilitate repair (5). In differentiating muscle cells, palladin regulates migration and myogenesis (6). Several research studies have focused on palladin expression and function in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Researchers have shown that expression of palladin in stromal fibroblasts of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an indication of the effectiveness of chemotherapy (7). The cancer associated transcription factor Twist1 may require palladin and collagen alpha1 for its metastatic effect in fibroblasts (8).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Actin (D18C11) Rabbit mAb #8456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4545 reacts with keratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 18 from human, rat and monkey. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize the same keratins in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluroescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4545 reacts with keratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 18 from human, rat and monkey. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize the same keratins in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545 reacts with human, rat and monkey pan-keratin. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Biotinylated) will also recognize pan-keratin in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PAR2 (F2RL1) belongs to the PAR (Protease-activated Receptor) family of G protein-coupled receptors. These membrane receptors are activated through N-terminal cleavage of the receptor by a serine protease such as thrombin, trypsin, or matrix metalloproteinases (1,2). This cleavage exposes the ‘tethered-ligand’ fragment of the receptor, which binds to a second extracellular loop of the receptor and leads to receptor activation. PAR2 is specifically activated by trypsin or trypsin-like proteases. Activated PAR2 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, interacts with β-arrestin, and eventually leads to ERK activation (3). PAR2 expression and activation are mainly associated with inflammatory diseases (3), but may also play a role in cancer development (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The AP-2 coat assembly protein complex is an important component of clathrin-coated pits involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis at the plasma membrane (1-3). Each AP-2 heterotetramer is composed of α, β, μ, and σ protein subunits. The 50 kDa μ subunit (AP-2μ, AP2M1) is located at the core of the AP-2 complex and mediates interaction between the cargo protein and the clathrin-coated pit (1-4). The carboxy-terminal AP2M1 region recognizes the tyrosine-based, endocytotic sorting motif YXXφ found in cargo proteins and helps to bring the cargo protein to the clathrin-coated pit. Non-canonical, tyrosine-based endocytotic sorting signals can also promote interaction between cargo proteins and AP2M1 (5,6). AP2M1 plays an essential role in molecular signaling as it couples receptor-mediated endocytosis and pathways involving membrane receptors (7-9), matrix metalloproteinases (10), and ion channel proteins (11). Phosphorylation of specific AP2M1 residues and binding of lipids to this adaptor protein can regulate AP2M1 activity (12,13). Phosphorylation of AP2M1 at Thr156 by adaptor-associated kinase 1 (AAK1) stimulates affinity binding of AP2M1 to cargo protein signals (14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ARHGAP family members activate Rho GTPase proteins (1). Mutations of ARHGAP family genes lead to carcinogenesis through the dysregulation of Rho/Rac/Cdc42-like GTPases (2). Little is known about the biological function of ARHGAP42, a member of the ARHGAP family. ARHGAP42 contains a RhoGAP domain in the middle of its sequence, an SH3 binding domain at the C-terminal end of the protein sequence, as well as a BAR domain and a PH domain in the N-terminal region of the sequence, which indicate that the protein may function as GTPase activator and cytoskeletal adaptor.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDC37 is an important component of the HSP90 chaperone complex (1,2). It was initially identified for its involvement in cell-cycle progression and was later found to have a much broader role as a chaperone for a wide variety of kinases and other proteins (1-3). CDC37 protein has an amino-terminal kinase binding domain followed by a central HSP90 binding domain. It recruits and stabilizes kinases in the HSP90 complex by protecting the newly synthesized kinase peptide chain from degradation and promoting the next step of protein maturation (4,5). CDC37 also suppresses the ATPase activity of HSP90, thereby leading to conformational changes in the complex that preclude target kinase loading (6). CDC37 has been proposed as a therapeutic target because of its important role in multiple kinase pathways involved in proliferation and cancer cell survival, including Raf, Akt, Src, and ErbB2 pathways (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP. GEF-H1 is a Rho GEF that localizes to microtubules and regulates Rho activity in response to microtubule destabilization (1). Loss of interaction between GEF-H1 and microtubules leads to activation of Rho (2). Phosphorylation of GEF-H1 at Ser886 (Ser885 in mouse), a site located in the 14-3-3 binding motif, has been implicated in recruitment of 14-3-3 and GEF-H1 to microtubules (3), and in the regulation of RhoA activity in response to mitotic kinases during cytokinesis (4).GEF-H1 has also been shown to localize to tight junctions and modulate polarized cell permeability (5,6). GEF-H1 is inactivated by binding to cingulin at epithelial tight junctions, inactivating RhoA and leading to G1/S arrest (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are highly conserved, ubiquitous scaffold proteins involved in localized signaling to help regulate focal contact assembly and cytoskeletal dynamics. GIT proteins contain multiple interaction domains that allow interaction with small GTPases (including ARF, Rac, and cdc42), kinases (such as PAK and MEK), the Rho family GEF Pix, and the focal adhesion protein paxillin (reviewed in 1). GIT1 and GIT2 share many of the same properties, but with at least ten distinct, tissue-specific splice variants. GIT2 has been shown to play an important role inhibiting focal adhesion turnover and membrane protrusion (2,3). Focal adhesion localization and paxillin binding of GIT2 is regulated through phosphorylation at one or more tyrosine sites (Tyr286, Tyr392, Tyr592) by FAK and/or Src (4,5,reviewed in 6). Once at the focal adhesion, GIT2 is thought to play a key role in cell polarity and migration, making it a protein of interest in the investigation of oncogenic signaling pathways (3,5,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms depending on its distribution. In smooth muscle, MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). This phosphorylation is correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). ROCK also phosphorylates Ser19 of smooth muscle MLC2, which regulates the assembly of stress fibers (3). Phosphorylation of smooth muscle MLC2 at Ser1/Ser2 and Ser9 by PKC and cdc2 has been reported to inhibit myosin ATPase activity (4,5). Phosphorylation by cdc2 controls the timing of cytokinesis (5). Transgenic mice lacking phosphorylation sites on the cardiac muscle isoform show morphological and functional abnormalities (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: REPS1 is a RalBP1-associated EH-homology domain containing protein. The sequence of REPS1 has an EH domain, followed by two proline-rich segments, and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain for binding to RalBP1 (1). The EH domain of REPS1 interacts with the NPF motif of Rab11-FIP2, mediates their colocalization to endosome vesicles, and influences EGFR endocytosis (2). The two proline-rich regions of REPS1 are important for binding to the SH3 domain of GRK/GRB2 and further regulate EGFR downstream signaling. The proline-rich regions of REPS1 have also been shown to interact with the SH3 domain of intersectin1 (ITSN1) and contribute to ITSN1/SGIP1/REPS1 complex formation on clathrin-coated pits (3). Three alternatively spliced isoforms of REPS1 have been identified.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Stathmin is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule destabilizing phosphoprotein that is upregulated in a number of cancers. The amino terminus of the protein contains multiple phosphorylation sites and is involved in the promotion of tubulin filament depolymerization. Phosphorylation at these sites inactivates the protein and stabilizes microtubules. Ser16 phosphorylation by CaM kinases II and IV (1,2) increases during G2/M-phase and is involved in mitotic spindle regulation (3,4). Ser38 is a target for cdc2 kinase (5) and TNF-induced cell death gives rise to reactive oxygen intermediates leading to hyperphosphorylation of stathmin (6). EGF receptor activation of Rac and cdc42 also increases phosphorylation of stathmin on Ser16 and Ser38 (7). Other closely related family members are neuronally expressed and include SCG10, SCLIP, RB3 and its splice variants RB3' and RB3''. Stathmin and SCG10 have been shown to play roles in neuronal-like development in PC-12 cells (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesions connect the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex structure of secreted macromolecules that surrounds mammalian organs and tissues. Integrins clustered on the extracellular side of focal adhesions signal from the ECM to intracellular protein complexes, which in turn signal to the actin cytoskeleton to regulate the tension needed for cell motility. Internal signals also converge on focal adhesions to regulate integrin affinity and avidity. Signaling through focal adhesions regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression, and impacts cellular processes such as development, wound healing, immune response, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis (reviewed in 1-3). Talin is a large, multidomain focal adhesion protein that interacts with the intracellular domains of integrins and other focal adhesion proteins. Talin is involved in the formation of focal adhesions and in linking focal adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton (4). The interaction between talin and integrins increases the affinity between integrin and both insoluble and soluble ECM proteins (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) was originally characterized as a substrate of both cGMP- and cAMP-dependent kinases (PKG and PKA, or cGPK and cAPK, respectively) (1). It is now believed that VASP belongs to the Ena/VASP family of adaptor proteins linking the cytoskeletal system to the signal transduction pathways and that it functions in cytoskeletal organization, fibroblast migration, platelet activation and axon guidance (2,3). Three phosphorylation sites, Ser157, Ser239, and Thr278, have been identified. Ser239 is the major PKG phosphorylation site while Ser157 is the major PKA phosphorylation site (4). Evidence suggests that VASP phosphorylation reduces its association with actin and has a negative effect on actin polymerization (5). Phosphorylation at Ser239 of VASP is a useful marker for monitoring PKG activation and signaling (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).